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Rare Species

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 30, 2000
A new puzzlement: That there are new findings that antecede the dinosaurs is no surprise ("Revived Microbe Predates T-Rex, Scientists Say," Oct. 19). Some sort of cellular life existed long before. Seen in a new light, a far more rare species of life exists today. I refer to the person who does not drive a car or have a computer. Such examples exist, though one is hard-pressed to accept that fact. Modern civilization may have every amenity, except the sense to acknowledge exceptions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The booming illegal international wildlife trade forced conservationists to do the unthinkable Tuesday: Brand the golden domes of two of the rarest tortoises on Earth to reduce their black market value by making it easier for authorities to trace them if stolen. "It's heartbreaking that it's come to this, but it's the right thing to do," Paul Gibbons, managing director of the nonprofit Turtle Conservancy's Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, said as he gently placed a 30-pound adult female ploughshare tortoise on a small table.
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NEWS
August 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rare species could be protected in a 22-mile stretch of Central California land that is being considered for becoming the state's fifth conservancy. The San Joaquin Valley Parkway project would include wildlife preserves for the area's pocket mice, longhorn beetles, bald eagles and great blue herons. Under a recently submitted plan, the $70-million project would be managed by a state-backed conservancy.
WORLD
November 23, 2009 | By Robyn Dixon
She was the spy who was undone by a furry little creature with huge, hypnotic eyes. It was the early 1980s, and a young Madagascan scientist named Hanta Rasamimanana had been dispatched by her pro-Soviet government to spy on a group of Americans working in the private Berenty Reserve in the southern part of the country. Instead of finding out what the Americans were really up to, she fell in love with the creatures they were studying: lemurs. Rasamimanana remembers how, on her first mission as a researcher-cum-spy, she paid more attention to American primatologist Alison Jolly and her comments about the primates than to her bosses' orders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1986 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Can the snake cholla hold its own against the march of progress? Can the San Diego barrel cactus coexist with condominiums? The City of Chula Vista hopes to prove that they can in one of the most extraordinary ecological niches in the county. Rice Canyon is a jewel on the eastern arm of the city--60 acres of pristine canyon off East H Street near Interstate 805.
NEWS
April 29, 1990 | TAD BARTIMUS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ranger Dan Moriarty's day was off to a typical start. There was an injured albatross in his bathtub and a dead sea turtle at his front door, both probably the victims of roving wild dogs or cats. Moriarty is manager of the Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge in the northernmost inhabited part of the Hawaiian Islands, a 45-minute flight from Honolulu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1988 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
A rare species of yellow sunflower, only 6 inches tall, briefly stood in the way this month of plans to build a Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in eastern Ventura County. The fragile sunflower, Pentachaeta lyonii , is known to exist only in 10 sites in the Santa Monica Mountains area, including the scenic hilltop between Simi Valley and Thousand Oaks where the library would be built, said Tim Thomas, chairman of the local chapter of the California Native Plants Society.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1996 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Dang Nhi returned from Vietnam this month, she had a collection of souvenirs, including four packages of cha bong, nestled inside her canvas suitcase. To the 23-year-old Anaheim woman, the dried shredded pork, marinated in sauce made from fresh fish netted off of Vietnam's coast, was a prized gift for relatives in America.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 1992 | JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A North Hills environmental activist has been convicted of threatening the head of a rival group during a dispute over which of Mother Nature's creatures needs more protection--the red fox or its prey, the rare Belding's savannah sparrow. Peggy Randall, 56, was ordered by Los Angeles Municipal Judge Anita Dymant to pay $405 in fines and court costs stemming from her conviction Friday on one count of making annoying or threatening phone calls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2000 | ANNETTE KONDO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The massive Ahmanson Ranch housing project can be built on the habitat of rare species without harming a threatened frog or a flower once believed extinct, according to developer Washington Mutual Inc. The firm recently made the assertion in a draft conservation plan filed with Ventura County in a bid to avoid delays in the 3,050-home project. The development, on the east Ventura County line, has become the focus of controversy.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2008 | Richard C. Paddock, Paddock is a Times staff writer.
EBay Inc. will halt the sale of ivory on its websites, a company spokeswoman said Tuesday, after an investigation by an animal welfare group found the online auction giant was listing thousands of animal products taken from endangered species. The International Fund for Animal Welfare concluded that two-thirds of the questionable items available online globally were being offered on EBay and its affiliates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2007 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
It's a treacherous, serpentine stretch of Topanga Canyon Boulevard dubbed the Narrows, and it's the bane of cyclists and runners alike. Bounded by a sandstone bluff on one side and a sheer drop into the Topanga Canyon Creek on the other, the Narrows is infamous for washouts, landslides and fallen rocks that frequently paralyze long lines of commuters traveling between the Valley and the Westside.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The city attorney filed vandalism charges Thursday against Robert Jan Vandehoek for allegedly cutting down plants that are part of endangered species' habitats in the Ballona Wetlands. Vandehoek was charged with multiple counts for allegedly destroying myoporum shrubs, killing a ficus tree and violating laws prohibiting the cutting of plant life without city approval. The vegetation that was destroyed was known to be home to several rare and endangered bird species, officials said.
NEWS
July 9, 2006 | Jim Krane, Associated Press Writer
It's one of the world's rarest birds, but there it sat on a mangrove branch, motionless, eyes peeled for a fiddler crab. The handsome white-collared kingfisher, its iridescent green back flickering in the dappled 110-degree sunshine, suddenly disappeared. A loud splash came from the swampy thicket. A millisecond later, the bird flashed past, on its way to a hideaway to crunch a live crab in its sharp black beak.
SCIENCE
February 7, 2006 | Robert Lee Hotz, Times Staff Writer
In one of the world's most isolated jungles, the Foja Mountains of western New Guinea, naturalists have discovered a vast unexplored preserve of exotic species new to science. During a 15-day expedition in December, the researchers found hundreds of rare birds, more than 20 new species of frogs, five kinds of previously unknown palms, four new breeds of butterflies, and giant rhododendrons with white blossoms the size of bread plates -- believed to be the largest on record.
NEWS
August 16, 2005 | By Bill Becher, Special to The Times
ANGLERS can expect to get skunked at some Sierra lakes this summer as crews kill trout to protect a rare frog. Officials are eliminating the prized game fish from 22 lakes, mainly in and around Sequoia National Park and the Eastern Sierra. The fish eat mountain yellow-legged frogs and their tadpoles, pushing the amphibian closer to the endangered species list. The frogs have declined by at least 80% since the 1950s. For anglers, the fish-removal program puts their conservation credentials to the test.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Louis Sahagun
The booming illegal international wildlife trade forced conservationists to do the unthinkable Tuesday: Brand the golden domes of two of the rarest tortoises on Earth to reduce their black market value by making it easier for authorities to trace them if stolen. "It's heartbreaking that it's come to this, but it's the right thing to do," Paul Gibbons, managing director of the nonprofit Turtle Conservancy's Behler Chelonian Center in Ventura County, said as he gently placed a 30-pound adult female ploughshare tortoise on a small table.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2005 | Sam Quinones, Times Staff Writer
The chain of events that brought Norm MacDonald, his helicopter, his rifle and his dogs from New Zealand to Santa Cruz Island began with the pig. Well, DDT and the pig. MacDonald is the owner of Prohunt, a New Zealand company hired to kill the several thousand feral pigs that endanger native plants and at least one native animal in the Channel Islands off Ventura.
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