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TRAVEL
October 5, 1986
Delaplane makes the serious error of saying there is no air service to the Cook Islands from North America. Please make sure that he knows that Air New Zealand flies into the Cooks every Tuesday from Tahiti. Therefore, there is easy access from Los Angeles to the Cook Islands via Tahiti every week. Furthermore, Rarotonga has had access from North America, via Tahiti, for over 10 years. TED COOK, chairman Islands in the Sun Newport Beach
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NEWS
January 15, 2012
The Cook Islands, named for Capt. James Cook, invite you to explore with a $938 round trip from LAX to Rarotonga on Air New Zealand. It is subject to availability. You can depart any Sunday between Feb. 5 and May 27 and return any Saturday from April 7 on. There's a one-year maximum stay. The ticket must be purchased by Jan 30. Info: Air New Zealand , (800) 262-1234 Source: Airfarewatchdog.com
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NEWS
January 15, 2012
The Cook Islands, named for Capt. James Cook, invite you to explore with a $938 round trip from LAX to Rarotonga on Air New Zealand. It is subject to availability. You can depart any Sunday between Feb. 5 and May 27 and return any Saturday from April 7 on. There's a one-year maximum stay. The ticket must be purchased by Jan 30. Info: Air New Zealand , (800) 262-1234 Source: Airfarewatchdog.com
TRAVEL
April 24, 2005
I enjoyed revisiting the little-known secret paradise that is the Cook Islands ["Bliss? You're Soaking in It," April 10]. My husband and I were lucky enough to experience Rarotonga and Aitutaki 13 years ago, and despite extensive foreign travel since, our adventures there remain closest to our hearts. We found an unspoiled, undeveloped beauty. Writer Rosemary McClure missed opportunities, however, by not renting or borrowing a moped instead of using a car. Navigating the left-side road is easier, you have more access to various places on the islands, and you find yourself waving at and interacting with locals in reciprocation for their waves and smiles as you pass by. Lisa Waldner Atwater Village
TRAVEL
April 24, 2005
I enjoyed revisiting the little-known secret paradise that is the Cook Islands ["Bliss? You're Soaking in It," April 10]. My husband and I were lucky enough to experience Rarotonga and Aitutaki 13 years ago, and despite extensive foreign travel since, our adventures there remain closest to our hearts. We found an unspoiled, undeveloped beauty. Writer Rosemary McClure missed opportunities, however, by not renting or borrowing a moped instead of using a car. Navigating the left-side road is easier, you have more access to various places on the islands, and you find yourself waving at and interacting with locals in reciprocation for their waves and smiles as you pass by. Lisa Waldner Atwater Village
TRAVEL
May 24, 1998
I read the Arthur Frommer column on French Polynesia ("Price Is Right for Polynesia," On a Budget, April 26) with some nostalgia, and a grain of salt. In 1994, I spent a month touring the Society Islands there. Some observations: I would recommend that anyone considering a visit buy a good guidebook and do some studying. It is a very expensive place to visit. The "charm of a French accent" that Frommer mentions means hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc., who are arrogant, condescending, rude and unfriendly.
TRAVEL
February 26, 1989 | JIM LEVEQUE
You've simply got to like a place where you can't put up a building any taller than a coconut tree, the jail will rent you a couple of prisoners to weed your taro patch, and when you die you can get buried in your own front yard. Many world maps don't even show the Cook Islands, and it's really not surprising that they're often ignored by cartographers.
TRAVEL
July 12, 1998 | ANN McKECHNIE, McKechnie is a librarian and teacher at Santa Monica High School
I was having a blissful vacation in the Cayman Islands five years ago when I happened to meet George Nowak, who wrote a book called "Which Way to the Islands." He told me that his favorite tropical island was Rarotonga in the South Pacific. The word-picture he drew of the lush island and its gracious people made me resolve to see Rarotonga before the arrival of golf courses and Big Macs.
TRAVEL
October 16, 2005 | Rosemary McClure, Times Staff Writer
SHIMMERING lagoons, lush green volcanic mountains, plumeria-scented tropical breezes: The South Pacific island of Rarotonga is so perfect it sometimes leaves visitors speechless. What's not to like about this Shangri-La? Anita Allen will tell you without much prompting. "The children need help in school." Allen, a Cook Islander, directs the Global Volunteers project in Rarotonga. About a dozen times a year, groups of U.S. citizens arrive for two-week stints helping in Rarotonga's schools.
TRAVEL
November 12, 2000 | LUCY IZON
The South Pacific's Cook Islands, made up of 15 islands, is a fascinating stop on your way Down Under. But there are few youth hostel accommodations, and camping isn't allowed on all islands, so booking a room before you arrive is recommended. International flights arrive on the main island of Rarotonga. It's thought that the original Polynesian settlers arrived here in double-hulled canoes in AD 800. By the 11th century they had built a coral road around the island that's still used today.
TRAVEL
July 12, 1998 | ANN McKECHNIE, McKechnie is a librarian and teacher at Santa Monica High School
I was having a blissful vacation in the Cayman Islands five years ago when I happened to meet George Nowak, who wrote a book called "Which Way to the Islands." He told me that his favorite tropical island was Rarotonga in the South Pacific. The word-picture he drew of the lush island and its gracious people made me resolve to see Rarotonga before the arrival of golf courses and Big Macs.
TRAVEL
May 24, 1998
I read the Arthur Frommer column on French Polynesia ("Price Is Right for Polynesia," On a Budget, April 26) with some nostalgia, and a grain of salt. In 1994, I spent a month touring the Society Islands there. Some observations: I would recommend that anyone considering a visit buy a good guidebook and do some studying. It is a very expensive place to visit. The "charm of a French accent" that Frommer mentions means hoteliers, restaurateurs, etc., who are arrogant, condescending, rude and unfriendly.
TRAVEL
February 26, 1989 | JIM LEVEQUE
You've simply got to like a place where you can't put up a building any taller than a coconut tree, the jail will rent you a couple of prisoners to weed your taro patch, and when you die you can get buried in your own front yard. Many world maps don't even show the Cook Islands, and it's really not surprising that they're often ignored by cartographers.
TRAVEL
October 5, 1986
Delaplane makes the serious error of saying there is no air service to the Cook Islands from North America. Please make sure that he knows that Air New Zealand flies into the Cooks every Tuesday from Tahiti. Therefore, there is easy access from Los Angeles to the Cook Islands via Tahiti every week. Furthermore, Rarotonga has had access from North America, via Tahiti, for over 10 years. TED COOK, chairman Islands in the Sun Newport Beach
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