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Rashid Karami

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NEWS
April 22, 1985
Syria has invited Lebanese Muslim and Druze leaders for talks in Damascus on Tuesday to try to heal a split caused by a bloody battle between rival Muslim factions in West Beirut last week, Lebanon's caretaker premier, Rashid Karami, said. Shia and Sunni Muslim religious and political leaders, plus those of the Druze, a Muslim offshoot, have all been invited to the talks, Karami said. "Fighting between brothers is unacceptable," he said. "We call for a correction of the sad situation."
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NEWS
August 22, 1987 | United Press International
A Lebanese army mechanic has been set free by a Swedish court after word was received from Lebanese authorities that he no longer is accused of killing Premier Rashid Karami, officials said. Elie Louis Salibi, 25, had been suspected of planting the bomb that ripped through Karami's army helicopter as it was leaving the Adma military base in the northern city of Tripoli for Beirut on June 1.
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NEWS
June 1, 1987
A helicopter carrying Lebanese Prime Minister Rashid Karami made a forced landing in Beirut early today after an explosion on board, officials said. There was no immediate word on the fate of the Sunni Muslim prime minister, but military sources said that Interior Minister Abdulla Rassi suffered "critical wounds." The stricken Puma helicopter made a forced landing at the Halat military air base in the Christian heartland north of Beirut.
NEWS
June 6, 1987 | United Press International
The Speaker of the Lebanese Parliament resigned unexpectedly Friday in a move that could plunge the war-torn country into its worst political crisis yet. Hussein Husseini, a pro-Syrian Shia Muslim leader who masterminded last month's abrogation of the Cairo agreement that allowed an armed Palestinian presence in Lebanon, is the first Speaker ever to resign.
NEWS
August 22, 1987 | United Press International
A Lebanese army mechanic has been set free by a Swedish court after word was received from Lebanese authorities that he no longer is accused of killing Premier Rashid Karami, officials said. Elie Louis Salibi, 25, had been suspected of planting the bomb that ripped through Karami's army helicopter as it was leaving the Adma military base in the northern city of Tripoli for Beirut on June 1.
NEWS
June 6, 1987 | United Press International
The Speaker of the Lebanese Parliament resigned unexpectedly Friday in a move that could plunge the war-torn country into its worst political crisis yet. Hussein Husseini, a pro-Syrian Shia Muslim leader who masterminded last month's abrogation of the Cairo agreement that allowed an armed Palestinian presence in Lebanon, is the first Speaker ever to resign.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The increasing burden of Lebanon's political and economic misery led Monday to the resignation of Rashid Karami, the country's once perennially optimistic premier. Karami, a 66-year-old Sunni Muslim from the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli, told reporters in Beirut that he is resigning his post "in the interest of the nation."
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Lebanese Muslims and Christians closed their shops and schools Tuesday in a nationwide strike to express their outrage at the assassination of Premier Rashid Karami. The minister of education, Salim Hoss, who is a Sunni Muslim as Karami was, agreed Tuesday to serve as premier for an interim period. President Amin Gemayel appointed Hoss to the post only hours after Karami was killed by a bomb that exploded on board his helicopter Monday.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Lebanese Premier Rashid Karami was assassinated Monday by a bomb planted aboard an army helicopter ferrying government officials from the northern city of Tripoli to West Beirut. Four other people, including Interior Minister Abdullah Rassi and the pilot, were seriously injured by the blast. But the helicopter, which was carrying 14 people, landed safely at a military airstrip near Jubayl, about 30 miles north of Beirut.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Christians joined Muslims in a nationwide strike today to protest the assassination of Premier Rashid Karami, who died when a bomb exploded inside his military helicopter.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Lebanese Muslims and Christians closed their shops and schools Tuesday in a nationwide strike to express their outrage at the assassination of Premier Rashid Karami. The minister of education, Salim Hoss, who is a Sunni Muslim as Karami was, agreed Tuesday to serve as premier for an interim period. President Amin Gemayel appointed Hoss to the post only hours after Karami was killed by a bomb that exploded on board his helicopter Monday.
NEWS
June 2, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Lebanese Premier Rashid Karami was assassinated Monday by a bomb planted aboard an army helicopter ferrying government officials from the northern city of Tripoli to West Beirut. Four other people, including Interior Minister Abdullah Rassi and the pilot, were seriously injured by the blast. But the helicopter, which was carrying 14 people, landed safely at a military airstrip near Jubayl, about 30 miles north of Beirut.
NEWS
June 1, 1987
A helicopter carrying Lebanese Prime Minister Rashid Karami made a forced landing in Beirut early today after an explosion on board, officials said. There was no immediate word on the fate of the Sunni Muslim prime minister, but military sources said that Interior Minister Abdulla Rassi suffered "critical wounds." The stricken Puma helicopter made a forced landing at the Halat military air base in the Christian heartland north of Beirut.
NEWS
May 6, 1987
Lebanese President Amin Gemayel withheld a decision on accepting Premier Rashid Karami's resignation. Speaking at a judicial ceremony, he said only that he will deal with Cabinet developments "as best suits the national interests and constitutional norms." Karami has refused to submit his resignation in writing, as required by the constitution. Meanwhile, the Christian Lebanese Forces militia urged Gemayel, a Christian, to form a new Cabinet and warned him against any attempts at compromise.
NEWS
May 5, 1987 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
The increasing burden of Lebanon's political and economic misery led Monday to the resignation of Rashid Karami, the country's once perennially optimistic premier. Karami, a 66-year-old Sunni Muslim from the northern Lebanese city of Tripoli, told reporters in Beirut that he is resigning his post "in the interest of the nation."
NEWS
August 26, 1986 | From Reuters
The new U.S. ambassador to Lebanon, John Hubert Kelly, met Monday with Lebanese Premier Rashid Karami. "We both expressed our hope that relations would remain very good and solid," Kelly told reporters after seeing Karami for the first time since he arrived here Friday.
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