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Rashomon

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Ned Benson has had a pretty typical life toiling on the Hollywood assembly line. Relocating to Los Angeles after graduating from Columbia in 2001, the former English major and aspiring filmmaker placed a few scripts on the industry's coveted Black List and landed work-for-hire writing jobs with some respected producers.   But as he banged out scripts for others' conventional projects, he wondered whether there weren't a different kind of movie to be made.   Or, rather, he wondered whether there weren't a different kind of movies to be made.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
Ned Benson has had a pretty typical life toiling on the Hollywood assembly line. Relocating to Los Angeles after graduating from Columbia in 2001, the former English major and aspiring filmmaker placed a few scripts on the industry's coveted Black List and landed work-for-hire writing jobs with some respected producers.   But as he banged out scripts for others' conventional projects, he wondered whether there weren't a different kind of movie to be made.   Or, rather, he wondered whether there weren't a different kind of movies to be made.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It's a film so profound that it changed the way we talk about truth and perception. Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa's 1950 masterpiece, "Rashomon," involves the rape of a woman and the apparent murder of her husband from the different accounts of four witnesses, including the rapist. The movie's inventive narrative comments on the subjective nature of memory, hence the term "Rashomon effect." Now, almost 60 years after "Rashomon" won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival as well as an honorary Oscar, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is premiering a restoration of the film Thursday at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2010 | By Richard Rayner
Occupied City A Novel David Peace Alfred A. Knopf: 288 pp., $25.95 David Peace raids fact for fiction, churning history and elements of his own life into hypnotic postmodern noir of almost unrivaled fury. His first four novels, which make up the "Red Riding Quartet" (adapted for television in Britain last year and reissued in paperback by Vintage), were a passionate rethinking of a central horror/myth from Peace's north of England upbringing: the decade-long search for serial killer Peter Sutcliffe, the Yorkshire Ripper.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2009 | Susan King
It's a tough call for classic film lovers on Friday -- Kurosawa or Welles? The beautifully restored print of Akira Kurosawa's landmark 1950 drama "Rashomon" visits the Nuart Theatre for a one-week engagement beginning Friday. Toshiro Mifune, Masayuki Mori and Machiko Kyo star in this groundbreaking examination of human nature that revolves around four people's differing accounts of a man's murder and the rape of his wife. www.landmarktheatres.com Effects pioneer Meanwhile, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is featuring a newly struck print of Orson Welles' 1941 masterwork "Citizen Kane" on Friday at the Linwood Dunn Theater.
OPINION
June 29, 2007
Re "Reel life was his real love," Column One, June 27 It has been 27 years since I last sat in Jim Hosney's classroom, listened to the whirl of a 35-millimeter projector in his apartment or heard that laugh, but time has diminished neither my fondness nor gratitude. While my vocations are law and politics rather than film, the lessons learned from this master permeate much of my work. One of the greatest testaments to Hosney is that my legal briefs, press releases and speeches often contain references to such decidedly nontraditional sources as "Alice in Wonderland" and "Rashomon."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1987 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Fringe shows shouldn't duplicate what can be seen any weekend in small theater. "The Ring of Steel" certainly supplied something different Monday night at the Mark Taper Forum--and on the "Babbitt" set, at that. It was an evening of sword fights. It didn't get monotonous. In fact there was too much variety, as with a piano recital where absolutely everybody in the studio gets a chance to perform. The show needed a stronger point of view, a narrator and a smaller, better-matched cast.
NEWS
June 1, 1997 | Michael Wilmington
Akira Kurosawa's great, furious adaptation of two stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa. The plot is a classic demonstration of the relativity of "truth": four diverging views of a murder and rape, three by the killer and his victims, one by a "detached" observer. The realization is superb--matchless cinematography by Kazuo Miyagawa, brilliant performances by Toshiro Mifune (left), Machiko Kyo (right), Mayasuki Mori and Takashi Shimura.
OPINION
March 12, 2009
Arecent study published in the Harvard Law Review suggests that video evidence, however clear to one viewer -- or to eight Supreme Court justices -- may not be persuasive to another. The basis of the study was a 2007 case reviewed by the Supreme Court that involved a Georgia man who was paralyzed after a police officer rammed his car during a high-speed pursuit. A video of the chase, recorded by a camera in the squad car, dominated the justices' examination.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1999
Howard Rosenberg compliments the second episode of "Everything's Relative" for venturing "beyond formulaic lines with 'Rashomon'-like flashbacks" (" 'Everything's Relative' Stumbles as It Treads Comedy's Low Road," April 6). I'm curious if it ventures beyond formulaic lines in the manner of the "Happy Days" episode with "Rashomon"-like flashbacks, the "Diff'rent Strokes" episode with "Rashomon"-like flashbacks, the "Mama's Family" episode with "Rashomon"-like flashbacks, or the "Hangin' With Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2009 | Susan King
It's a tough call for classic film lovers on Friday -- Kurosawa or Welles? The beautifully restored print of Akira Kurosawa's landmark 1950 drama "Rashomon" visits the Nuart Theatre for a one-week engagement beginning Friday. Toshiro Mifune, Masayuki Mori and Machiko Kyo star in this groundbreaking examination of human nature that revolves around four people's differing accounts of a man's murder and the rape of his wife. www.landmarktheatres.com Effects pioneer Meanwhile, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is featuring a newly struck print of Orson Welles' 1941 masterwork "Citizen Kane" on Friday at the Linwood Dunn Theater.
OPINION
March 12, 2009
Arecent study published in the Harvard Law Review suggests that video evidence, however clear to one viewer -- or to eight Supreme Court justices -- may not be persuasive to another. The basis of the study was a 2007 case reviewed by the Supreme Court that involved a Georgia man who was paralyzed after a police officer rammed his car during a high-speed pursuit. A video of the chase, recorded by a camera in the squad car, dominated the justices' examination.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2008 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
It's a film so profound that it changed the way we talk about truth and perception. Japanese filmmaker Akira Kurosawa's 1950 masterpiece, "Rashomon," involves the rape of a woman and the apparent murder of her husband from the different accounts of four witnesses, including the rapist. The movie's inventive narrative comments on the subjective nature of memory, hence the term "Rashomon effect." Now, almost 60 years after "Rashomon" won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival as well as an honorary Oscar, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is premiering a restoration of the film Thursday at the Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills.
OPINION
June 29, 2007
Re "Reel life was his real love," Column One, June 27 It has been 27 years since I last sat in Jim Hosney's classroom, listened to the whirl of a 35-millimeter projector in his apartment or heard that laugh, but time has diminished neither my fondness nor gratitude. While my vocations are law and politics rather than film, the lessons learned from this master permeate much of my work. One of the greatest testaments to Hosney is that my legal briefs, press releases and speeches often contain references to such decidedly nontraditional sources as "Alice in Wonderland" and "Rashomon."
OPINION
June 17, 2005 | Steven Hill, Steven Hill is a senior fellow with the New America Foundation and author of "Fixing Elections: The Failure of America's Winner Take All Politics" (Routledge Press, 2003).
With Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger calling a special election for November -- the fourth statewide ballot in four years -- one gets the feeling that we've seen this movie before. But which movie is it? Is it "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," the Frank Capra classic in which an outsider battles special interests on behalf of the people? Certainly Schwarzenegger would like us to believe that narrative with himself in the Jimmy Stewart role. Or is the movie "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Lawless Heart" is a charming, disarming and in some ways humbling film. It is so adroit in its structure, so insightful in how it explores its vivid characters that it forces us to acknowledge not only how complicated all lives are but also how easy it is to be self-centered and miss those complications in everyone else.
OPINION
June 17, 2005 | Steven Hill, Steven Hill is a senior fellow with the New America Foundation and author of "Fixing Elections: The Failure of America's Winner Take All Politics" (Routledge Press, 2003).
With Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger calling a special election for November -- the fourth statewide ballot in four years -- one gets the feeling that we've seen this movie before. But which movie is it? Is it "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," the Frank Capra classic in which an outsider battles special interests on behalf of the people? Certainly Schwarzenegger would like us to believe that narrative with himself in the Jimmy Stewart role. Or is the movie "Dr. Jekyll and Mr.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1985
Heinosuke Gosho's "Woman of the Mist" (screening Thursday at UCLA's Melnitz Theater, 7:30 p.m.), made in 1936, remains a timeless masterpiece and is perhaps the best film in the ongoing "Before 'Rashomon' " series. Gosho grew up in Tokyo's old downtown business district, which is the quaint, crowded setting of this film, and the affection and compassion with which he regards its hard-working, breezy denizens suffuse it from start to finish.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2002 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nostalgia and crime--prominent themes in the season's new series--recur in a pair of dramas arriving Sunday on NBC. Tender but laborious, "American Dreams" opens in 1963 with the happy feet of Philadelphia's "American Bandstand" leading eventually to a somber funeral cortege for JFK after Dallas. Later that evening comes "Boomtown," a stylish, high-sheen, entertaining crime-fighting hour told from the different perspectives of its Los Angeles characters.
NEWS
April 4, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Akira Kurosawa's powerful 1950 drama "Rashomon" was given an honorary Oscar for outstanding foreign language film, won the Golden Lion at the Venice Film Festival and was voted by the Village Voice Film Critics' Poll as one of the 10 best films of the 20th century. Even the title has become synonymous for a story that is told from different points of view.
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