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WORLD
September 5, 2011 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
This city of 20 million people, the frenetic embodiment of India's energy, ambition and chaos, doesn't do quiet very well, even as it pauses for a few hours after midnight to rejuvenate. Tonight, monsoon rains from the Arabian Sea are forcing its thousands of street dwellers to retreat to dank hallways and dimly lit underpasses. Mahesh Suresh Kamble and his co-worker, Sangpal Sitaram Bachate, wait for the rain to ease before heading to a complex of four-story apartments in the heart of the city, aware that their prey prefers indoor comfort in such weather.
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BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
A major manufacturer of anti-fungal products has filed suit in Los Angeles against a competitor, contending that hundreds of thousands of shoe boxes coming into U.S. ports each day could contain a chemical used in rat repellent. The chemical, known as allyl isothiocyanate, is one of the main active ingredients in packing material made by YCM Co., of Taiwan, according to a civil lawsuit filed Tuesday by competitor Micro-Pak, of Hong Kong. The two companies both make items to thwart the growth of fungus or mold, which can ruin shoes during shipment by sea. Because most shoes sold in the U.S. come from Asia aboard cargo container ships that take multi-day ocean voyages, footwear manufacturers commonly put some kind of anti-moisture packing material in shoe boxes, usually silica gel packets or anti-fungal stickers or sheets.
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MAGAZINE
May 5, 1996
Until a few years ago, I was unable to appreciate rats the way Ann Thomas does ("Finks No Longer," by Ed Leibowitz, March 17). My turnaround came as I left work one evening and walked toward my parking garage, past the UCLA research lab's loading docks. It was almost dusk, and the snow-white coat of a huge rat stood out like a new moon as it scuttled frantically to find a hiding place. Its plight had also been noticed by a group of students who were cheering it on: "Go, rat, go!" they shouted.
OPINION
April 20, 2014
Re "Rat poisons linked to disease, death in wildlife," April 17 What makes humans so convinced we can outsmart Mother Nature? Our "kill first" mentality has made us blind to effective, nonlethal solutions to human-wildlife conflicts. I volunteer at a wildlife rescue; we provide a service that keeps homes rodent-free by sealing cracks where critters enter. Often those who balk at paying $150 for this non- lethal solution don't think twice about paying a pest control service monthly to spread poisons.
SCIENCE
July 28, 2012 | By Amina Khan
Are you ready for this jelly? Using rat heart cells and silicone, engineers at Caltech and Harvard have built a tiny, swimming, artificial jellyfish. The centimeter-wide creation moves by using muscles in its soft body to pump water, just as its living peers do. And since real jellyfish, with their long tentacles, were once named after Medusa, the snake-haired monster of Greek myth, the scientists have dubbed their nonliving critter Medusoid. Rather than try to mimic the jellyfish wholesale, the researchers decided to identify some of the factors  that make the jellyfish a successful swimmer - shape, stroke cycle, properly organized muscle fibers, elastic recoil - and built their jelly according to those principles.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Justin Timberlake said adieu to his single life on Thursday in Las Vegas, as the actor-singer was spotted with a crew of friends celebrating what appeared to be his bachelor party. Kicking off at the Wynn's Sinatra Restaurant, JT and a group of about 25 guys decked out in Rat Pack-esque suits for a meal, according to a Ministry source - more than appropriate as the joint is described as a culinary tribute to Ol' Blue Eyes. Heading to the hotel's Surrender nightclub just before midnight, Timberlake and company climbed out of their formal wear and into bathing suits, splashing in a private infinity pool within a reserved cabana.  Timberlake sipped on 901 tequila, his own brand, while his party opted for vodka and Red Bull.
SCIENCE
June 3, 2013 | By Amina Khan
UFO watchers' eyes were set ablaze recently by reports of what looked like a stony rodent lurking among the rocks on Mars. The so-called Mars rat, spotted in an image taken last year by the NASA rover Curiosity's Mast Camera, captured imaginations even as it inspired several new parody Twitter accounts. But, just so it's clear, this Red Planet rodent - which looks rather more like a guinea pig to this reporter's eye - is no more real than the Man in the Moon. In fact, the rat likely comes from the same source as that lunar visage: the human brain.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 1990
Regarding "Plan to Crush a Rat in Performance Art Show Stirs Debate" (Jan Breslauer, Jan. 11): As an artist and a person with compassion for all feeling creatures, I was both angered and repulsed by the proposal (of performance artist Rick Gibson) to use a sentient animal in such a cruel manner. An artist's "rights" end where another's life (person or animal) begins! ELAINE LIVESEY-FASSEL, Los Angeles
FOOD
September 27, 1990 | AUDREY M. OGLAN, Los Angeles
The Times reports, rather flippantly, that laboratory rats succumbed to respiratory failure after being fed large doses of Louisiana hot sauce. We are not told how long they had to await death with their intestines on fire. It is appalling that such senseless cruelty is still permitted in civilized societies.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
A major manufacturer of anti-fungal products has filed suit in Los Angeles against a competitor, contending that hundreds of thousands of shoe boxes coming into U.S. ports each day could contain a chemical used in rat repellent. The chemical, known as allyl isothiocyanate, is one of the main active ingredients in packing material made by YCM Co., of Taiwan, according to a civil lawsuit filed Tuesday by competitor Micro-Pak, of Hong Kong. The two companies both make items to thwart the growth of fungus or mold, which can ruin shoes during shipment by sea. Because most shoes sold in the U.S. come from Asia aboard cargo container ships that take multi-day ocean voyages, footwear manufacturers commonly put some kind of anti-moisture packing material in shoe boxes, usually silica gel packets or anti-fungal stickers or sheets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Martha Groves
The mountain lion known as P-22 looked majestic just a few months ago, in a trail-camera photo shot against the backdrop of the Hollywood sign. But when a remote camera in Griffith Park captured an image of the puma more recently, it showed a thinner and mangy animal. Scientists sedated him and drew blood samples. They found evidence of exposure to rat poisons. Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes.
NATIONAL
April 8, 2014 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - The Rev. Al Sharpton, the long-time political agitator and TV personality famous for his willingness to take on law enforcement and the establishment, admitted Tuesday he had worked with the FBI years ago but insisted he was not a "rat. " "I was not and am not a rat," said Sharpton, who held a news conference at the headquarters of his National Action Network to respond to a report Monday on the Smoking Gun.  "I'm a cat," he added. "I chase rats. " The Smoking Gun said Sharpton was known to the FBI as CI-7, or confidential informant 7, and informed on mob figures in New York for several years, starting in the mid-1980s.
SCIENCE
April 7, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
You know an unhealthy diet can make you fat, but new research suggests it can sap your motivation too. In a study published in the journal Physiology & Behavior, researchers at UCLA found that rats fed a diet low in fat but high in simple sugars and refined flour were not only more obese than rats that had a better diet, but also less willing to work for a reward.  MORE: Medicines and machines, inspired by nature "The obese rats...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Betsy Sharkey, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Donkeys who stare, salesmen who pester, filmmakers who prod, killers who smile and kids who run wild are just a few of the weird, wacky and wonderful ideas that drive the indefinable 66 that fill this year's shorts program at the Sundance Film Festival. With technology making it relatively inexpensive and easy to go from idea to execution, the outer edge of creative invention can often be found in short films. From my sampling of this year's lineup, the further out, the better. Take "Rat Pack Rat," from filmmaker Todd Rohal ("The Guatemalan Handshake")
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
The plight of the Lyubov Orlova has grabbed the imagination of the media with its tale of cannibal rats" aboard an abandoned vessel drifting in the north Atlantic -- possibly toward the U.K. On Thursday, reports surfaced that high winds could be pushing the vessel and its rats toward the shore of western Ireland, Scotland or the southern tip of England. If it weren't for the starving rodents believed to be feeding on one another on the craft, the story of this cruise vessel turned ghost ship could have an aura of romance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2013 | By Robert J. Lopez
The owner of a Westside bakery has been charged with two dozen misdemeanor criminal counts for alleged health code violations that included allowing rats and pigeons to infest his business. Peter Plotitsa, 53, is accused of continuing to operate the Cake Collection after he was ordered in January to close the business by county health inspectors who observed evidence of rodent droppings, according to the Los Angeles city attorney's office. In a follow-up inspection at the Sawtelle neighborhood bakery in July, "investigators allegedly observed live rats, live pigeons roosting, rodent and pigeon droppings as well as gnaw marks on the building," officials with the city attorney's office said in a statement.
HOME & GARDEN
January 9, 2010 | By Jeff Spurrier
It's hard not to admire the common house mouse, Mus musculus . Upon setting up a new home, it neatly separates kitchen, bedroom and toilet areas. It has evolved to make its own vitamin C, and it's sensible enough to fear not only black lights (possibly because a mouse's urine has a fluorescent glow) but also rats (Musicide is common). Males are bucks. Females are does. A baby mouse is called a pinky. If you tickle a mouse, it laughs. It's all so cute, but there is a reason why the word "mouse" comes from mus , a Sanskrit word for "thief."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2013 | By Hailey Branson-Potts and Ruben Vives
The $340-million Gov. George Deukmejian Courthouse opened its doors to the public Monday, its glass facade glimmering in the sunlight just down the street from the decrepit 55-year-old Long Beach courthouse it is replacing. The new 531,000-square-foot building, part of the Los Angeles County Superior Court System, has 24 operating courtrooms with room to expand to 30, according to court officials. The new building is more than 65% bigger than the old courthouse. The building has wireless Internet access throughout and space for five retail occupants, including the Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2013 | By Carla Rivera
Los Angeles firefighters found "pack rat conditions" inside the North Hills home of an 81-year-old man who was killed along with his dog when fire consumed the structure. Fire investigators Friday were still searching for the cause of the blaze that tore through the one-story single-family home in the 16300 block of Plummer Street. The fire was reported just after 9 p.m. Thursday, sending up a large plume of smoke and shooting flames out of the front windows. The victim was identified as Donald Worthen, said Los Angeles County coroner's assistant chief Ed Winter.
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