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Rat Poison

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1985
This is an appeal to owners of rat poison. If at all possible, please try to find another way to deal with rats, gophers, and other rodents. Rat poison contains strychnine, which has been sweetened to get the gophers to eat it. This same sweet taste attracts children and pets as well, with tragic results. Even when used properly, cats and dogs will eat the poisoned rodents. Our German shepherd was killed by this substance. Siegfried loved people very much and was full of the joy of life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
Brittany Murphy's death may not have been from natural causes, her estranged father says, citing a new toxicology report that suggests death via poisoning.  The "8 Mile" and "Clueless" actress, who passed away in December 2009 at age 32, was declared to have died from acquired pneumonia and severe anemia. Her husband, Simon Monjack, died five months later at age 40 from the same natural causes. Angelo Bertolotti, Murphy's biological father, reportedly sued to get access to hair samples that had gone unused during the investigation following the actress' death, then sought testing from an independent lab.  PHOTO GALLERY: Brittany Murphy on tour with the USO The Carlson Co. lab report, obtained by the Wrap , indicated the presence of high levels of 10 heavy metals in Murphy's hair and, barring accidental exposure to all the metals simultaneously, suggested the source could be "a third-party perpetrator with likely criminal intent.
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NEWS
March 21, 1986 | Associated Press
SmithKline Beckman Corp. today withdrew Contac, Dietac and Teldrin from the market because trace amounts of a rat poison had been found in five tampered capsules. The decision followed by one day the release of findings that there had been threats made against the over-the-counter drugs, that some of them had been tampered with and that flour and cornstarch had been found in them in two cities. No injuries were reported.
OPINION
April 9, 2013
Re "Ban super rat poisons," Editorial, April 5 Reckitt Benckiser, the maker of d-CON pesticides, is challenging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's attempt to stop the sale of second-generation rodenticides because we believe it is the right thing to do for consumers. Rodent infestations are a threat to public health, and if the EPA's actions were to take effect, the alternatives for consumers would include products that contain a powerful neurotoxin with no known antidote (unlike d-CON products)
SCIENCE
December 12, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
D-CON kills rats and mice, the label reads. And, according to state and federal officials, it can kill hawks, owls, eagles, foxes, bobcats, mountain lions and other non-targeted wildlife too. So can competing brands. Pesticide manufacturers have been selling a new generation of more potent anticoagulants because mice and rats have built up some resistance to the old standby warfarin. These super-toxic rat poisons have a longer half-life before they break down, meaning they are more effective at working their way up the food chain -- not only killing rodents but their natural predators.
NATIONAL
January 13, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Two red pandas were found dead inside their exhibit at the National Zoo, and three employees who went inside the enclosure fell ill. Zoo officials are investigating whether rat poison used at the zoological park may have played a role. The adult male red pandas, about the size of large house cats, are unrelated to the giant pandas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
After more than a month of delay, the National Park Service dropped thousands of poisoned pellets over East Anacapa Island on Wednesday morning in a long-planned effort to kill its population of black rats. An animal advocacy group had tried to block the $700,000 eradication program in Channel Islands National Park, contending that the poison would harm other wildlife on the three islets of the island off the Ventura County coast. But a U.S.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | Times Wire Services
Sea creatures and birds are at risk after 18 tons of rat poison spilled into the sea at one of the world's most famous feeding grounds for whales, dolphins and seals, conservation officials said Thursday. But they said there had been no immediate large-scale damage from the bright-green poison pellets, which fell into the sea from a truck that jackknifed on a coastal highway Wednesday near Kaikoura on New Zealand's South Island.
WORLD
September 16, 2002 | From Reuters
Rat poison may be to blame for a mass food poisoning that killed 41 people and sent hundreds to hospitals near China's eastern city of Nanjing over the weekend, state media reported today. "Initial investigations indicate there was rat poison in the food that was served to victims," the China Daily quoted Zhou Qiang, a Jiangsu provincial government spokesman, as saying.
NEWS
June 27, 1996 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 12-year-old girl has been sentenced to five years in a supervised juvenile care facility after pleading guilty to pouring rat poison in her teacher's Gatorade, and prosecutors agreed to drop the more serious charge of attempted murder. The girl showed no remorse for her crime, said San Bernardino County Deputy Dist. Atty. Karen Parker-Parent, and the teacher was so upset by the attempt on her life that she was unable to finish reading a prepared statement at the girl's sentencing.
OPINION
April 5, 2013
Poison-control centers receive about 15,000 calls a year from parents of children younger than 6 who have been exposed to poison that was intended to kill rats or mice, according to a January report by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. A disproportionate number of those children are black and Latino, and living in poverty. The EPA's concern about exposure extends to cats, dogs and wildlife as well. The so-called second-generation rodenticides that have been developed in recent years leave high concentrations of toxins in the bodies of rodents, which renders their carcasses poisonous to pets, birds of prey and other animals that eat them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2013 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
ANACAPA ISLAND - Just as factories brag about their accident-free days, Channel Islands National Park is showing off this rugged island's rat-free decade. To get rid of Rattus rattus , officials had a helicopter shower one-square-mile of Anacapa with poisonous green pellets in 2001 and 2002. On Wednesday, they ferried a boatload of reporters and scientists to the square-mile chain of three islets and declared victory. "The last thing we needed was a project that got only 99.9% of all the island's rats," said Kate Faulkner, a National Park Service biologist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 23, 2012 | Joe Mozingo
State scientists, grappling with an explosion of marijuana growing on the North Coast, recently studied aerial imagery of a small tributary of the Eel River, spawning grounds for endangered coho salmon and other threatened fish. In the remote, 37-square-mile patch of forest, they counted 281 outdoor pot farms and 286 greenhouses, containing an estimated 20,000 plants -- mostly fed by water diverted from creeks or a fork of the Eel. The scientists determined the farms were siphoning roughly 18 million gallons from the watershed every year, largely at the time when the salmon most need it. "That is just one small watershed," said Scott Bauer, the state scientist in charge of the coho recovery on the North Coast for the Department of Fish and Game.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
D-CON kills rats and mice, the label reads. And, according to state and federal officials, it can kill hawks, owls, eagles, foxes, bobcats, mountain lions and other non-targeted wildlife too. So can competing brands. Pesticide manufacturers have been selling a new generation of more potent anticoagulants because mice and rats have built up some resistance to the old standby warfarin. These super-toxic rat poisons have a longer half-life before they break down, meaning they are more effective at working their way up the food chain -- not only killing rodents but their natural predators.
OPINION
May 14, 2007
Re "They scamper, we stalk," Column One, May 9 This informative article about the rodent problem in Los Angeles unfortunately left out the intense suffering these mammals experience as a result of poisoning and, even worse, glue traps. These smart, resourceful animals scream and will chew off limbs and skin in an attempt to escape the traps. They ultimately die of starvation or dehydration -- sometimes it takes days -- if they are not fortunate enough to be found and dispatched sooner.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2007 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
The bad news for animal lovers Friday was that an industrial chemical was found in recalled pet food, but the worst news was that authorities still didn't know why hundreds of dogs and cats in North America fell ill or died. The Food and Drug Administration said its tests of pet food made by Menu Foods Income Fund of Ontario, Canada, turned up melamine, a chemical used to make plastic, glue, fertilizer and paint.
BUSINESS
March 24, 2007 | Martin Zimmerman and Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writers
Rat poison was identified Friday as the substance suspected of contaminating pet food that has killed or sickened dogs and cats across the nation, although it is still unclear how the deadly chemical got into the food. Federal officials, meanwhile, reported an expanded recall of dog and cat food produced by Menu Foods of Ontario, Canada.
WORLD
March 9, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
A Chinese company has been refused permission to use the name of a disgraced official as a brand name to sell rat poison, state media reported. New China News Agency reported that Shenyang Feilong Pharmaceutical Co. applied last month to use the name of Zheng Xiaoyu, who was fired as head of the national food and drug watchdog on suspicion of taking bribes.
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