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Ratatouille Movie

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NEWS
June 28, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Brad Bird was brought in to take over "Ratatouille," a new movie about -- sacre bleu! -- a rodent in a five-star Parisian restaurant, he immediately took issue with the rats. They were all wrong. To begin with, they were walking around on two legs. And they had short tails. "They were trying to deratify the rats," Bird said of the animators who were working on the Pixar/Disney film before he came on board.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2007 | From the Washington Post
We get the box-office concept of the penguin, we do. It's the rat movies we don't get. Penguins can be sweet little buddies struggling to survive in a harsh world ("March of the Penguins"); they can giggle and then dance like Savion Glover ("Happy Feet"). And boy, can they surf ("Surf's Up"). Last weekend brought "Ratatouille," about a rat living in the walls of a Paris bistro who wants to be a chef. Julia Child: rolling in her grave. Perhaps there are other cinematically underserved animals?
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2007 | From the Washington Post
We get the box-office concept of the penguin, we do. It's the rat movies we don't get. Penguins can be sweet little buddies struggling to survive in a harsh world ("March of the Penguins"); they can giggle and then dance like Savion Glover ("Happy Feet"). And boy, can they surf ("Surf's Up"). Last weekend brought "Ratatouille," about a rat living in the walls of a Paris bistro who wants to be a chef. Julia Child: rolling in her grave. Perhaps there are other cinematically underserved animals?
NEWS
June 28, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Brad Bird was brought in to take over "Ratatouille," a new movie about -- sacre bleu! -- a rodent in a five-star Parisian restaurant, he immediately took issue with the rats. They were all wrong. To begin with, they were walking around on two legs. And they had short tails. "They were trying to deratify the rats," Bird said of the animators who were working on the Pixar/Disney film before he came on board.
FOOD
August 1, 2007 | Laurie Winer, Special to The Times
SOMETHING fresh happens onscreen in "No Reservations," the newest in that newly burgeoning genre, American foodie cinema, and it's not the sea bass poached in a court bouillon with sautéed batonnet of carrots and zucchini (though that fish with vegetables cut into baton shapes looks pretty fresh). Beyond the batonnet, viewers may discern a sea change in the way moviemakers are portraying a now glamorous profession (or hobby). After an awkward and self-conscious start ("Spanglish" anybody?
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