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Ratatouille Movie

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NEWS
June 28, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Brad Bird was brought in to take over "Ratatouille," a new movie about -- sacre bleu! -- a rodent in a five-star Parisian restaurant, he immediately took issue with the rats. They were all wrong. To begin with, they were walking around on two legs. And they had short tails. "They were trying to deratify the rats," Bird said of the animators who were working on the Pixar/Disney film before he came on board.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The rodent tale "Ratatouille" leads contenders for the Annie Awards honoring animation, picking up 13 nominations, among them best picture and voice-acting honors for Patton Oswalt, Ian Holm and Janeane Garofalo.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2007 | From the Washington Post
We get the box-office concept of the penguin, we do. It's the rat movies we don't get. Penguins can be sweet little buddies struggling to survive in a harsh world ("March of the Penguins"); they can giggle and then dance like Savion Glover ("Happy Feet"). And boy, can they surf ("Surf's Up"). Last weekend brought "Ratatouille," about a rat living in the walls of a Paris bistro who wants to be a chef. Julia Child: rolling in her grave. Perhaps there are other cinematically underserved animals?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2007 | Gregory Viscusi, Bloomberg News
PARIS -- Remy is an ordinary rat in Paris. Except that he can talk and has dreams of becoming a chef. It's not so surprising: Remy is the star of "Ratatouille," a new animated film. Remy is shown a pest-control shop by his father, who tells him that humans can't be trusted and do nasty things to rodents. To eerie background music and in the light of a street lamp on a wet night, the father points to the scores of dead rats hanging by strings in the window.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2007 | From the Associated Press
The rodent tale "Ratatouille" leads contenders for the Annie Awards honoring animation, picking up 13 nominations, among them best picture and voice-acting honors for Patton Oswalt, Ian Holm and Janeane Garofalo.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Show up and be yourself -- and get paid to do it. That's the job description Patton Oswalt accepted when he was cast as the lead voice in the new Pixar/Disney film, "Ratatouille." The film revolves around a rat named Remy (Oswalt) who dreams of becoming a master chef at a five-star restaurant in Paris. The voice of Remy had been difficult to cast, but then one day writer-director Brad Bird heard a routine of Oswalt's on the radio. "I was talking about the Black Angus Steak House....
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2007 | Gregory Viscusi, Bloomberg News
PARIS -- Remy is an ordinary rat in Paris. Except that he can talk and has dreams of becoming a chef. It's not so surprising: Remy is the star of "Ratatouille," a new animated film. Remy is shown a pest-control shop by his father, who tells him that humans can't be trusted and do nasty things to rodents. To eerie background music and in the light of a street lamp on a wet night, the father points to the scores of dead rats hanging by strings in the window.
FOOD
August 1, 2007 | Laurie Winer, Special to The Times
SOMETHING fresh happens onscreen in "No Reservations," the newest in that newly burgeoning genre, American foodie cinema, and it's not the sea bass poached in a court bouillon with sautéed batonnet of carrots and zucchini (though that fish with vegetables cut into baton shapes looks pretty fresh). Beyond the batonnet, viewers may discern a sea change in the way moviemakers are portraying a now glamorous profession (or hobby). After an awkward and self-conscious start ("Spanglish" anybody?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2007 | From the Washington Post
We get the box-office concept of the penguin, we do. It's the rat movies we don't get. Penguins can be sweet little buddies struggling to survive in a harsh world ("March of the Penguins"); they can giggle and then dance like Savion Glover ("Happy Feet"). And boy, can they surf ("Surf's Up"). Last weekend brought "Ratatouille," about a rat living in the walls of a Paris bistro who wants to be a chef. Julia Child: rolling in her grave. Perhaps there are other cinematically underserved animals?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
Show up and be yourself -- and get paid to do it. That's the job description Patton Oswalt accepted when he was cast as the lead voice in the new Pixar/Disney film, "Ratatouille." The film revolves around a rat named Remy (Oswalt) who dreams of becoming a master chef at a five-star restaurant in Paris. The voice of Remy had been difficult to cast, but then one day writer-director Brad Bird heard a routine of Oswalt's on the radio. "I was talking about the Black Angus Steak House....
NEWS
June 28, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
WHEN Brad Bird was brought in to take over "Ratatouille," a new movie about -- sacre bleu! -- a rodent in a five-star Parisian restaurant, he immediately took issue with the rats. They were all wrong. To begin with, they were walking around on two legs. And they had short tails. "They were trying to deratify the rats," Bird said of the animators who were working on the Pixar/Disney film before he came on board.
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