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FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times restaurant critic
This is Beverly Hills?, I wondered, oh so many years ago when a friend took me to lunch in a sweet little house with a fireplace on South Beverly Drive. Chez Mimi later moved to Santa Monica, and Urth Caffé now dispenses soy lattes and iced green tea from that rose-covered cottage. Back then (and now), South Beverly Drive didn't seem fancy at all, more like a small-town Main Street where you'd find shops selling nightgowns and one-piece swimming suits, baseball cards and birthday gifts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Saying that better schools are critical for California's prosperity, GOP gubernatorial candidate Neel Kashkari proposes changing the way education is funded, making traditional schools more like charters and increasing online learning. "We must reject the status quo," the former U.S. Treasury official says in a 33-page policy paper set for release Tuesday. He calls for money to be sent directly to the state's 10,000 public schools rather than to their districts. He would throw out much of the state's education code, which governs the operation of schools, and effectively allow most schools to operate under the same rules as charters.
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NEWS
September 12, 1998
1995: Initial Sexual Encounters Monica Lewinsky began her White House employment as an intern in the Chief of Staff's office in July 1995. At White House functions in the following months, she made eye contact with the President. During the November 1995 government shutdown, the President invited her to his private study, where they kissed. Later that evening, they had a more intimate sexual encounter. They had another sexual encounter two days later, and a third one on New Year's Eve. A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2014 | By Kurt Streeter
Seeking a way to prevent violence like last year's deadly Boston Marathon bombing, an Islamic advocacy group Monday announced a plan aimed at helping U.S. mosques identify and reeducate radicals. The Muslim Public Affairs Council - which long has pushed for a moderate, American-based Islam - hopes its "Safe Spaces Initiative" will get mosques to stop a pattern of dealing with extremists by simply shunning them and kicking them out. The plan was unveiled a day before Tuesday's one-year anniversary of the marathon bombing, allegedly orchestrated by ethnically Chechen Muslim brothers who lived in the Boston area.
SCIENCE
July 9, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Medical castration to treat localized prostate tumors does not prolong survival and its side effects far outweigh any potential benefit for most patients, researchers reported today. The technique, which involves using drugs to block the body's production of the male hormone androgen, is a powerful tool when used in conjunction with surgery or radiation for treating aggressive prostate tumors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1988 | TED ROHRLICH and DAVID TREADWELL, Times Staff Writers
Long just a sleepy town in rural south-central Florida that swelled each winter with the influx of vacationers, Okeechobee in recent years has become a center for the lucrative drug-smuggling trade. Planes loaded with contraband land in isolated fields in the county or on the lake, which is almost 50 miles wide and covers a half-million acres. Still, it was a shock to learn about Larry Greenberger. Larry was the scion of an old and respected local family, and few, if any, residents suspected that he was a big-time cocaine dealer.
NEWS
December 3, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Cummings, the perennially youthful bachelor photographer of the 1950s television series "The Bob Cummings Show," died Sunday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills. Cummings, 80, died of kidney failure and complications of pneumonia, hospital spokeswoman Louella Benson said. The actor, who also was in advanced stages of Parkinson's Disease, was admitted to the hospital Nov. 18.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2003 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
After struggling for months with wobbly finances and internal dissension, the director of UCLA Medical Center announced Tuesday that he will leave his job to take a top post at the University of Kentucky's medical center. Dr. Michael Karpf, 58, has been with UCLA since 1995 and oversaw the school's three hospitals and 18 primary-care clinics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1993 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If it please the court, let us stipulate to a few things upfront: First, Zsa Zsa Gabor does n ot look so fat that it would take three or four strong men to lift her onto a horse. And Elke Sommer does not resemble a bald-headed, Hollywood has-been who hangs out in seedy bars and has to sell hand-knitted pullover sweaters to eke out a living.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Drew Birtness, the last straw came when he realized he was arresting the grandchildren of suspects he had picked up years ago. The Los Angeles County sheriff's deputy had been working the streets of East Los Angeles for 21 years, long enough to be hardened by the shootings and deaths and gangs--but also long enough to try something new. "I was tired of picking up kids' bodies off the street," he said.
SPORTS
April 7, 2014 | Bill Dwyre
Somewhere, lost in the sleaze that all so often defines what college basketball has become, are the overlooked culprits. Mom and Dad. We in the media rant on and on about AAU coaches and summer leagues and slimeball agents (is that redundant?). We harp on coaches who cheat to get the blue-chip player and college administrators who look the other way. We make fun of the NCAA because it is so big and pompous and obtuse and full of itself and makes so much money off the pimpled backs of teenagers.
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By Shan Li
California's economy perked up in February, adding 58,800 net new jobs and gaining some momentum after a lackluster showing the month before. The job gains helped push the unemployment rate down to 8% from 8.1% in January, the state's Employment Development Department reported Friday. "California employment is coming back very nicely after a bump in the month of January," said Sung Won Sohn, an economics professor at Cal State Channel Islands. "We are seeing more and more cylinders in the economic engine firing.
SPORTS
February 22, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
The Galaxy's present met its future Saturday at the StubHub Center. And it was likely the future of Major League Soccer that was on display as well. On one side were Robbie Keane, Omar Gonzalez and Landon Donovan, guys you've probably heard of. Let's call them Galaxy I. On the other side - we'll call them Galaxy II - were Travis Bowen, Raul Mendiola and Cody Laurendi, guys you probably haven't heard of. But the organization is hoping those will soon be household names as well, which is why it founded a USL Pro team, basically a minor league affiliate, for whom they can play and train.
SPORTS
January 30, 2014 | By Dylan Hernandez
The Dodgers won't be able to start Michael Young at second base on opening day if they decide Alexander Guerrero isn't ready to play in the major leagues by then. Young, 37, will retire from baseball, according to a person familiar with the situation who spoke under the condition of anonymity. The seven-time All-Star said over the weekend that he was deciding between playing for the Dodgers and retiring to spend more time with his three sons. “I want to be around my sons,” Young said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Howard Blume
The Los Angeles Unified School District will pay substantially less for thousands of iPads under the latest deal with Apple. The cost of the tablets that will be used on new state tests will be about $200 less per device, although the computers won't include curriculum. The revised price will be $504, compared to $699 for the iPads with curriculum. With taxes and other fees, the full cost of the more fully equipped devices rises to $768. The iPads are part of a $1-billion effort to provide a computer to every student, teacher and administrator in the nation's second-largest school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | Sandy Banks
I can't understand the beating death of Kim Pham, the 23-year-old woman kicked and pummeled to death outside a popular nightclub in Santa Ana. I can't understand the silence of her friends, who were with her that night and must have seen the altercation but refuse to talk to police. I can only understand the pain and confusion of Pham's father, who is trying to come to grips with the sudden loss of a much-loved daughter who seemed destined for success: She'd graduated from college, recently moved out of the family home and had just begun a new job. A few hours before she was beaten unconscious, she was reportedly texting her buddies about how she should wear her hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1993 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
When they converged in San Francisco about 45 years ago, Wolfgang Paalen, Gordon Onslow Ford and Lee Mullican wanted nothing less than to be image makers of cosmic freedom. The purpose of art, they thought, was self-transcending awareness.
WORLD
October 17, 2002 | David Holley and William Lobdell, Times Staff Writers
VATICAN CITY -- Putting his personal stamp on a Roman Catholic tradition virtually untouched in 500 years, Pope John Paul II added a new set of meditations to the church's beloved rosary Wednesday -- a move that will alter the way many of the world's estimated 1 billion Catholics reflect on the life of Jesus Christ. In terms of official Catholic doctrine, the pope's additions to the rosary prayers hold little significance because they change no official church teaching.
BUSINESS
January 19, 2014 | By Stefan Stern
All companies sit somewhere in a supply chain. Most have competitors and collaborators. And yet we look at businesses very often in isolation - as if their results depend solely on their own separate efforts. The principal achievement of the book "Network Advantage: How to Unlock Value From Your Alliances and Partnerships" is to draw attention to the importance of these broader networks to the success or failure of businesses. With detailed and thoroughly researched case studies, the authors - Henrich Greve and Andrew Shipilov of INSEAD global graduate business school and Timothy Rowley of the Rotman School of Management in Toronto - show how to take a more systematic approach to the portfolio of networks and alliances in which businesses find themselves.
SPORTS
January 18, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Juergen Klinsmann is nothing if not flexible. So when most of the players in the U.S. national team pool ignored his suggestion to play in Europe to prep for this summer's World Cup, Klinsmann turned the slight into a compliment for Major League Soccer. At least that's how it sounded. "It's exciting," Klinsmann said last week in an interview with the Associated Press in Brazil, where the national team is holding part of its winter training camp. "The players who are in Europe, many of them big players, are now back in MLS. "MLS is getting better every year.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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