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WORLD
May 18, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Senior Obama administration officials urged the Senate on Tuesday to swiftly ratify a new arms reduction treaty with Russia, arguing that it would improve ties with Moscow and build pressure on adversaries such as Iran and North Korea. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates said that although the New START treaty did not solve all the nuclear issues between Moscow and Washington, it would pay dividends by convincing non-nuclear nations that the U.S. is committed to trimming its stockpile to reduce the world's nuclear dangers.
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OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "CIA denies Senate spying claim," March 12 Anyone who fails to appreciate the supreme irony of Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) righteous indignation over the CIA's alleged spying on and undermining of the Senate Intelligence Committee (of which Feinstein is chair) has not been paying attention. For years, she has been one of the intelligence community's most steadfast champions, deflecting criticism of the surveillance state, attacking whistle-blowers and justifying nearly every abuse.
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WORLD
April 8, 2010 | By Christi Parsons
With an agreement to scale back the weaponry of the world's two greatest nuclear powers, President Obama and Russian President Dimitry Medvedev signed a long-sought treaty that still will require the ratification of both governments. One year after unveiling his vision here for a world without nuclear weapons, Obama returned this morning to sign a treaty with the Russian president that both sides call a major step forward on worldwide arms control. In a ceremony at the medieval Prague Castle, Obama and Medvedev signed a "New START" treaty that administration officials say will bring U.S. and Russian nuclear arsenals to their lowest levels since the early 1960s.
OPINION
September 25, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Having a physical disability profoundly disconnects a person from the world in which the able-bodied live and move, and makes a challenge out of numerous mundane tasks. The Americans with Disabilities Act, which was passed more than two decades ago, prohibits many forms of discrimination against the disabled and mandates that they be provided with equal access to buildings, workplaces, programs, services and public accommodations. The federal law was the model for the United Nations treaty known as the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which requires participating countries to provide equal access for the disabled.
WORLD
June 13, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Irish citizens voted on whether to accept or reject the European Union's new constitution, which seeks to reshape EU institutions and powers to cope with the bloc's near-doubling in size over the last four years, from 15 to 27 nations with 495 million people. The Lisbon Treaty contains many of the same plans as the EU's previous master plan, which French and Dutch voters rejected in 2005. This time, only Ireland's 3.05 million voters pose a serious threat to ratification, because the other 26 members are requiring approval only by their national governments.
NEWS
November 6, 1987 | United Press International
Spain joined the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty on Thursday, becoming the 136th nation to formally adhere to the pact. The Spanish government took the action by depositing the instruments of ratification with the governments of the United States, the Soviet Union and the United Kingdom.
NEWS
May 6, 1985 | BILL CURRY, Times Staff Writer
By an accident of history, the past may be catching up with Congress. A little-noted and long-forgotten constitutional amendment--among the first 12 sent for ratification to the new United States of America in 1789--has recently become noticed again, and increasing numbers of states are ratifying or considering ratification of the amendment to restrain Congress where it would hurt the most. It forbids U.S. senators and representatives to raise their own pay until an election is held.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1988
President Reagan's State of the Union address will be televised live at 6 tonight on ABC, CBS, NBC and on cable's CNN and C-SPAN. Radio coverage airs at 6 p.m. on KCRW-FM (89.9), KFWB (980), KGIL (1260 AM), KNX (1070), KPCC-FM (89.3), KPFK-FM (90.7). In addition, C-SPAN will also have tape-delayed coverage at 8:30 p.m.
NEWS
September 16, 1987
Ventura County reached a tentative agreement with its largest employee union, ending five months of negotiations and averting a strike threatened for today. Details of the accord were not released. Officials of the Public Employees Assn. of Ventura County will explain the terms to their 2,900 members today before making a public announcement. County negotiator Ed McLean said only that the contract met guidelines imposed by the Ventura County Board of Supervisors.
OPINION
March 14, 2014
Re "CIA denies Senate spying claim," March 12 Anyone who fails to appreciate the supreme irony of Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) righteous indignation over the CIA's alleged spying on and undermining of the Senate Intelligence Committee (of which Feinstein is chair) has not been paying attention. For years, she has been one of the intelligence community's most steadfast champions, deflecting criticism of the surveillance state, attacking whistle-blowers and justifying nearly every abuse.
WORLD
September 25, 2013 | By Paul Richter
UNITED NATIONS - The United States on Wednesday signed a treaty that seeks to regulate the international trade in conventional arms, but ratification in the Senate remains uncertain because of the strong resistance of gun rights advocates. Secretary of State John F. Kerry signed the Arms Trade Treaty in a ceremony at the United Nations, insisting that it would have no effect on Americans' ability to buy weapons and little effect on overseas sales because of U.S. export controls that are already in place.
OPINION
September 17, 2013 | By Jesse Rifkin
Gregory Watson's college essay received a C - and changed America. The next time someone goes on about how one citizen can't make a difference in this country or how the political system cannot be changed, tell them the story of Watson and the 27th Amendment. On Constitution Day, Sept. 17, the power of the individual citizen in America is not dead. In 1982, a University of Texas political science professor assigned an essay about the governmental process. Watson, then a student, came across a long-forgotten constitutional amendment proposed in 1789 and chose that topic for his paper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 29, 2011 | By Howard Blume, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Unified School District and its teachers union have agreed to a new pact granting local schools more autonomy over hiring, curriculum and work conditions and virtually ending a 2-year-old policy that allowed charter operators and others to take over low-performing and new campuses. The agreement, tentative until union members vote on it, doesn't resolve key contract disputes, including whether teacher evaluations should include students' standardized test scores, a provision L.A. schools Supt.
NEWS
December 22, 2010 | By James Oliphant and Michael Muskal, Washington bureau
The Senate ratified the strategic nuclear arms treaty between the United States and Russia on Wednesday, fulfilling President Obama's major foreign policy goal for the lame-duck session. By 71-26, the Senate approved the treaty, known as New START, which Republicans had blocked. A jubilant Vice President Joe Biden announced the results in his role as the Senate's presiding officer. Top Republicans continued to oppose the treaty, but 13 Republicans crossed over to vote for pact.
OPINION
November 21, 2010 | By Dianne Feinstein
A year ago this week, American officials wrapped up a two-day inspection of a Russian strategic missile base at Teykovo, 130 miles northeast of Moscow, where mobile SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles are deployed. Twelve days later, their Russian counterparts wrapped up a two-day inspection at Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri, home to a strategic bomb wing. These inspections are noteworthy because they are the last to be conducted under the 1991 Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty, or START, which expired in December 2009.
WORLD
November 5, 2010 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
The White House is scrambling to strike a last-minute deal with congressional Republicans to save its new nuclear arms treaty with Russia from a lingering death. Obama administration officials are trying to win the support of the GOP point man, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, to schedule a ratification vote in the upcoming lame-duck session rather than next year, when Republicans will hold six more Senate seats. The treaty, which also awaits ratification in Russia, would lower each country's maximum number of long-range active nuclear warheads and set procedures for them to inspect each other's strategic nuclear bases.
NEWS
May 23, 1988 | Associated Press
Senate Minority Leader Bob Dole warned fellow Republicans today "it would be an embarrassment" to President Reagan if the Senate fails to approve the medium-range missile treaty by the time Reagan meets Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev in Moscow next weekend. The Kansas senator told his colleagues, "the ball is in our court, the Republicans' court" as the Democratic-controlled chamber began a second week of work on the intermediate-range nuclear forces treaty.
OPINION
September 17, 2013 | By Jesse Rifkin
Gregory Watson's college essay received a C - and changed America. The next time someone goes on about how one citizen can't make a difference in this country or how the political system cannot be changed, tell them the story of Watson and the 27th Amendment. On Constitution Day, Sept. 17, the power of the individual citizen in America is not dead. In 1982, a University of Texas political science professor assigned an essay about the governmental process. Watson, then a student, came across a long-forgotten constitutional amendment proposed in 1789 and chose that topic for his paper.
NATIONAL
August 22, 2010 | Andrew Malcolm and Ashley Powers
The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. Last week marked the 90th anniversary of the 19th Amendment to the United States Constitution, the one that gave women the right to vote after a full century of organization, agitation and marching. On Aug. 18, 1920, the Tennessee General Assembly became the 36th state to ratify the amendment, thus making it official.
OPINION
August 9, 2010 | By Rebeccah Heinrichs
While the Obama administration trades horses and twists arms to get a nuclear arms reduction treaty with Russia through the Senate before the November elections, no one seems to have noticed that Washington is making all the concessions and Moscow none. Under mounting pressure from the White House, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) has been pushing to vote the treaty out of his committee. That vote was expected last week but now has been postponed until after the August congressional recess.
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