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Rating System

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BUSINESS
August 22, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
As part of his plan to boost economic mobility for the middle class, President Obama unveiled a proposal Thursday that would implement a college rating system based partly on affordability and job prospects after graduation. The new rating system is intended to give parents and prospective students more information about the colleges they are considering.  The ratings, which will be developed through public hearings around the country, would rank schools based on factors such as affordability, student debt loan ratios and scholarships awarded.  PHOTOS: Workers beware -- top cities with falling wages The Obama administration will also pursue legislation to tie the rating system to federal financial aid. Students attending "high-performing" colleges would receive more federal aid, for instance.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith
Mayor Eric Garcetti wants buildings across Los Angeles to be graded for their seismic safety as part of an ambitious plan to help residents understand the earthquake risks of their office buildings and apartments. Garcetti announced what would be the nation's first seismic safety grading system for buildings during his State of the City address Thursday, when he also for the first time said he supports some type of mandatory retrofitting of older buildings that have a risk of collapse in a major earthquake.
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BUSINESS
November 19, 2010 | By Sharon Bernstein, Los Angeles Times
The Better Business Bureau, which has been under fire for boosting the ratings of businesses that became dues-paying members, said Thursday that it would alter its rating process. "For nearly 100 years, the BBB has stood for public trust, and we are taking these steps to maintain that trust," said Steve Cox, chief executive of the Council of Better Business Bureaus in Washington. "Given the feedback, we feel it is our duty to take immediate steps to address the concerns raised and enhance our ability to help consumers easily and quickly find trustworthy businesses," Cox said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Rong Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith
Mayor Eric Garcetti wants buildings across Los Angeles to be graded for their seismic safety in an ambitious plan to help residents understand the earthquake risks of their office buildings and apartments. Garcetti announced what would be the nation's first seismic safety grading system for buildings during his State of the City address Thursday, when he also for the first time said he supports some type of mandatory retrofitting of older buildings that have a risk of collapse in a major earthquake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith
Mayor Eric Garcetti wants buildings across Los Angeles to be graded for their seismic safety as part of an ambitious plan to help residents understand the earthquake risks of their office buildings and apartments. Garcetti announced what would be the nation's first seismic safety grading system for buildings during his State of the City address Thursday, when he also for the first time said he supports some type of mandatory retrofitting of older buildings that have a risk of collapse in a major earthquake.
FOOD
September 1, 1994
Your article on salad mixes (Bag That Salad, Aug. 25) confirmed what I had suspected all along: These mixes are high in price and low in quality. And speaking of quality, your quality ratings aren't very informative. There's no scale and no indication of what the numbers mean. Is 1 high or low? Is the range 1 to 5? 1 to 10? 1 to 100? It makes a difference. On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 the best and 1 the worst, I give your quality rating system a 1. --MARY TERRILL Torrance Editor's Note: We goofed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996
Re "Toss and Tumble," by Ronald Collins, Commentary, March 3: I hate to argue against idealism, but Collins needs to step into reality. Television programs are created to keep consumers' attention until the next aired commercial. It is that simple. As the Home Shopping Network has proven, programming at all might be optional. "Free" television is presently struggling with all of its cable competition and desperately needs to create new methods of maintaining its audience to pay the rent at the studio.
NEWS
May 11, 2001
"The Perils of Pedicure: Health Officials Warn of Unclean Foot Baths" (May 4) was scary . . . and disgusting! Like food establishments, nail salons should be examined, tested and rated periodically, with ratings clearly posted. Realistically, how many consumers will "insist" on foot spa disinfecting procedures between customers and know whether those procedures are being performed properly or not? BARBARA SMITH Los Angeles
NEWS
February 15, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation's four television networks are in talks to establish a rating system, similar to the one used in motion pictures, in an effort to head off the threat of government regulation of programs with violent or sexual content, sources said Wednesday. Top executives from ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox have been meeting in New York and Los Angeles in an attempt to forge an agreement in advance of a White House summit later this month on television violence, the sources said.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The film industry movie-rating system, which was severely criticized on Thursday in a 15-page opinion issued by the New York judge presiding over a ratings suit, faces two more challenges next week. Miramax Films said on Friday that it will appeal the decision upholding the X rating given to "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
When Jack Valenti , the president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, asked historian and public television host Richard Heffner to oversee the group's controversial movie ratings system, Heffner turned it down, saying his mother "did not raise me to count nipples. " But Heffner eventually reconsidered and became, by some accounts, "the least-known most powerful person in Hollywood. " Heffner, who for two decades helped parents decide which movies were suitable for children, died Tuesday at his New York City home of a cerebral hemorrhage, said his son, Daniel Heffner.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
China's box office through the first three quarters was up 35% from last year, with contemporary-themed Chinese films drawing particularly large audiences. Yu Dong, chief executive of Nasdaq-listed Chinese movie studio and distributor Bona Film Group, was in Los Angeles this month for the Asia Society's U.S.-China Film Summit and meetings with Hollywood partners, including Fox International Productions. We caught up with him to talk about the state of the market and his studio's plans for 2014.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
College students, faculty and administrators met Wednesday at Cal State Dominguez Hills to express their concerns about President Obama's proposals to make college more affordable. The forum is one of four public sessions held around the country - and the only one in California - for the Obama administration to gather input on the president's recently announced agenda to develop a college rating system.  Dozens attended the forum and spoke to the panel - headlined by U.S. Undersecretary of Education Martha Kanter - expressing their concerns about the reliability and unintended consequences of such a system.  The rating score card, to be launched for the 2015 school year, would be based on such measures as the percentage of low-income students receiving federal Pell grants, average tuition and student debt, graduation and transfer rates.  Other proposals would award more financial aid to students at higher-rated colleges and create incentives for new cost-saving approaches, such as three-year bachelor's degrees and online programs.
OPINION
August 27, 2013
Re “How to pick a college,” Opinion, Aug. 23, and “College ratings could backfire” Editorial, Aug. 23 College presidents Barry Glassner and Morton Schapiro make a rational argument that students should choose schools that can help foster their pursuits and interests. While some students know before entering college what field they intend to go into, for a majority of American kids today, college is the time to figure that out. If young people choose a school based only on what they think they know or like when they are 18, we'll wind up with many unhappy 20-year-olds.
OPINION
August 23, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The United States didn't develop its great universities by reducing higher education to equations of graduation rates and job placement. Yet on Thursday, the Obama administration revealed a plan that would push colleges in that very direction and could harm some of the students the president most wants to help. The president's proposal to make higher education "a better bargain" includes some strong elements, especially a public rating system for colleges that will help students make thoughtful choices about which schools are best for them.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
As part of his plan to boost economic mobility for the middle class, President Obama unveiled a proposal Thursday that would implement a college rating system based partly on affordability and job prospects after graduation. The new rating system is intended to give parents and prospective students more information about the colleges they are considering.  The ratings, which will be developed through public hearings around the country, would rank schools based on factors such as affordability, student debt loan ratios and scholarships awarded.  PHOTOS: Workers beware -- top cities with falling wages The Obama administration will also pursue legislation to tie the rating system to federal financial aid. Students attending "high-performing" colleges would receive more federal aid, for instance.
BUSINESS
October 20, 2002
No one argues that quality measurement on health care provided by individual doctors is desirable ["Blue Cross to Rate Doctors," Oct. 10]. However, we must have some assurance that the yardstick is appropriate. My trusting self tells me that Blue Cross of California is finally paying more attention to quality than merely the bottom line. My cynical self and experience with Blue Cross, however, tell me that this will likely be just another scheme to justify a lower reimbursement rate to most physicians while claiming that the current rate is already serving as the bonus promised for the chosen few. It will be one of the happiest days in my life to be proved wrong in my skepticism.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While acknowledging that the current movie ratings system has "served the public interest and the (film industry) for years," the Writers Guild of America on Friday added its voice to the chorus of critics calling for changes. "Our feeling is that there is something wrong (with the ratings system)," said WGA West President George Kirgo, adding his personal view that the ratings have not "kept up with the times."
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Was the college you attended -- and, hopefully, graduated from -- a good deal? And what about the college your son/daughter attended, or is attending? No, it's not a trick question. On Thursday, President Obama proposed , as The Times reported, “a new rating system that would reward universities that provide better value for students' tuition dollars”: By 2018, the Department of Education would seek to use that rating system to reward colleges providing the best value, allocating larger grants to universities that see better outcomes.
NEWS
August 22, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli and Kathleen Hennessey
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- President Obama began a two-day bus tour here by laying out new proposals to address what he called a “crisis” of college affordability, including a new rating system that would reward universities that provide better value for students' tuition dollars. Obama said the new initiatives were part of his agenda to improve the standing of America's middle class, which he said was his “highest priority” despite the many challenges facing his administration. The president chose move-in day at the University of Buffalo to outline his new college aid proposals, thanking more than 7,000 students at a sports arena for taking time away from “setting up your futons” to hear his message.
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