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Ratings System

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OPINION
October 19, 2006
The Classification and Rating Administration referred to in the Oct. 14 editorial, "This editorial not yet rated," is made up of parents who are trained by the chairman to assign ratings to movies that they think an average American parent would give to guide other parents in deciding what movies their children see. The Motion Picture Assn. of America ratings board rates each film according to the parameters found on our website. All movie ratings and ratings' descriptions are posted on www.filmratings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia, Doug Smith
Mayor Eric Garcetti wants buildings across Los Angeles to be graded for their seismic safety as part of an ambitious plan to help residents understand the earthquake risks of their office buildings and apartments. Garcetti announced what would be the nation's first seismic safety grading system for buildings during his State of the City address Thursday, when he also for the first time said he supports some type of mandatory retrofitting of older buildings that have a risk of collapse in a major earthquake.
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NEWS
February 15, 1996 | SALLIE HOFMEISTER and JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The nation's four television networks are in talks to establish a rating system, similar to the one used in motion pictures, in an effort to head off the threat of government regulation of programs with violent or sexual content, sources said Wednesday. Top executives from ABC, NBC, CBS and Fox have been meeting in New York and Los Angeles in an attempt to forge an agreement in advance of a White House summit later this month on television violence, the sources said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Elaine Woo
When Jack Valenti , the president of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, asked historian and public television host Richard Heffner to oversee the group's controversial movie ratings system, Heffner turned it down, saying his mother "did not raise me to count nipples. " But Heffner eventually reconsidered and became, by some accounts, "the least-known most powerful person in Hollywood. " Heffner, who for two decades helped parents decide which movies were suitable for children, died Tuesday at his New York City home of a cerebral hemorrhage, said his son, Daniel Heffner.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 21, 1997 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Guns, knives and violent acts on television" are dangerous to kids, a citizen of Peoria, Ill., proclaimed at Monday's town hall meeting there to hash over the industry's infant program rating system with entertainment leaders and a congressional subcommittee. Most Peorians who were present appeared to share her sentiments. So, obviously, viewers are fed up with television violence. Yes, so fed up that an average of 22.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1990
If Jack Valenti's pride and joy, the ratings system, is truly as fragile as he says it is, then he's only reinforcing the fact that we need a stronger alternative. I don't want anything so fragile it can't withstand a little change regulating what I can and can't see. D. BRITTEN Glendale
OPINION
March 27, 2012 | By David Dobkin
Do movies need a ratings system? Yes. Is the Motion Picture Assn. of America doing it well? Not even close. Should things change? Of course they should. And that change should happen now, over the movie"Bully"and the issues of decency and common sense it raises. This film, directed by Lee Hirsch, follows the real-life stories of five bullied kids over the course of a school year. It's a story kids everywhere should see. But it will be released this weekend with no rating, a risky move since fewer theaters are likely to show it. That decision was forced by the MPAA, which despite ample protests insisted on giving "Bully" an R rating, putting it off limits for kids younger than 17 unless accompanied by an adult.
BUSINESS
November 4, 2006 | Meg James, Times Staff Writer
Television ratings giant Nielsen Media Research on Friday delayed the launch of a controversial system to measure viewership for commercials after encountering stiff resistance from TV programmers who believed the ratings system wasn't ready for prime time. "We have $50 billion in advertising revenue riding on this," said Alan Wurtzel, NBC Universal's president of research. "There's no value in rushing to do something before it's ready.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1990 | JACK MATHEWS, TIMES FILM EDITOR
When pornographers took the Motion Picture Assn. of America's adults-only X rating, multiplied it by three ("XXX!!!) and made it the beacon for fans of love stories without love, they gave MPAA President Jack Valenti's voluntary movie ratings system a flat tire. On Wednesday, after a decade of controversy, prodding and a couple of lawsuits, Valenti got out and changed the tire. The X rating is now called NC-17. Same category, same meaning--no children under 17 admitted--but without the taint.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1995 | DANIEL HOWARD CERONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A team of men and women learning how to assess and rate interactive entertainment products last year had a problem with belching and flatulence: They didn't know how to classify it. Actually, one video game in particular was causing the problem, featuring MTV's infamous Beavis and Butt-head.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Julie Makinen
China's box office through the first three quarters was up 35% from last year, with contemporary-themed Chinese films drawing particularly large audiences. Yu Dong, chief executive of Nasdaq-listed Chinese movie studio and distributor Bona Film Group, was in Los Angeles this month for the Asia Society's U.S.-China Film Summit and meetings with Hollywood partners, including Fox International Productions. We caught up with him to talk about the state of the market and his studio's plans for 2014.
BUSINESS
August 22, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
As part of his plan to boost economic mobility for the middle class, President Obama unveiled a proposal Thursday that would implement a college rating system based partly on affordability and job prospects after graduation. The new rating system is intended to give parents and prospective students more information about the colleges they are considering.  The ratings, which will be developed through public hearings around the country, would rank schools based on factors such as affordability, student debt loan ratios and scholarships awarded.  PHOTOS: Workers beware -- top cities with falling wages The Obama administration will also pursue legislation to tie the rating system to federal financial aid. Students attending "high-performing" colleges would receive more federal aid, for instance.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
It's past midnight on Saturday and the Enabler is riding shotgun in a cherry red Honda Fit with a woman named Ruth Grayson. We're trolling the streets of Hollywood, looking for people to pick up. No, the Enabler is not desperate for a date, she is checking out a new car service called Lyft that set up shop in L.A. in January. Lyft is part of a growing number of smartphone-app-based car services, including Uber and SideCar, that aim to fill the safe-ride gap left by traditional cabs, which can be pricey, impersonal and, quite often in Los Angeles, late.
AUTOS
April 4, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration will post a request online Friday morning soliciting comments in the Federal Register on a range of topics, including a proposed "Silver Car Rating System for Older Occupants. " All of the comments are being sought for possible changes in the NHTSA's New Car Assessment Program (NCAP), which provides vehicle information that enables consumers to compare the safety performance and features of new vehicles. "A 'silver car' rating system in NCAP could be developed as a tool for providing crash safety information for older consumers," the request for comments said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2013
Is Scott Weiland still the frontman of Stone Temple Pilots? Depends on whom you ask. Early Wednesday, the other three members of that grunge-era holdover - guitarist Dean DeLeo, bassist Robert DeLeo and drummer Eric Kretz - released a tersely worded statement declaring that they had "officially terminated Scott Weiland. " The firing came after what Rolling Stone recently described as "a rocky period" for the band, which, following a lengthy break, reunited in 2008 and toured heavily in support of a self-titled 2010 album.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Concerned about a backlash against violent television shows and movies in the wake of several high-profile mass shootings, the entertainment industry is rolling out an advertising campaign it hopes will keep lawmakers off its back. The goal of the initiative is to inform parents about the "many tools that can help them manage what their children see on television and at the movies. " Among the groups backing the effort are the Motion Picture Assn. of America, National Assn. of Broadcasters, the National Assn.
NEWS
September 27, 2000 | JAMES BATES and AMY WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In tiptoeing toward tighter policies on marketing violent movies to children, Hollywood risks misreading people such as Sheree Johnson. The 44-year-old Los Angeles middle school teacher admits she doesn't know what an "R" rating really means. She was comfortable enough to take her 10-year-old son to see the romantic drama "Waiting to Exhale." But her 15-year-old daughter saw the explicit horror spoof "Scary Movie," and it was so gross that the teenager wished she'd skipped it.
OPINION
November 15, 2012
One of the most valuable pieces of information about a video game is also the simplest: the rating that tells parents what ages the story and graphics are suitable for and why it might not be right for younger users. But as games have moved from computers and consoles to mobile devices, the rating systems have multiplied. Apps for the iPhone and the iPad, Facebook, Android devices, BlackBerrys, Kindles and Windows phones all go through separate ratings processes, each with its own set of labels.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Balloting began Tuesday in the Goodreads Choice Awards 2012 ; before the day was half over, more than 37,000 votes had been cast. Members of the free social reading site Goodreads can vote for 15 books in 20 categories. Those categories are different than most literary awards, and get highly specific. For example, a fantasy fan can vote for books in three separate categories: Fantasy, Paranormal Fantasy and Young Adult Fantasy. And that doesn't include Horror, or Science Fiction, or Romance, each of which is fantastic in its own way. Another unique aspect of the Goodreads Readers Choice Awards is the inclusion of write-in candidates.
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