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OPINION
August 16, 2009 | Newt Gingrich, Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich is founder of the Center for Health Transformation.
When Sarah Palin said that the emerging healthcare reform legislation would lead to "death panels" and government rationing of care, her language was explosive, but her premise about rationing was not. The most critical test of any reform proposal is whether it will empower individuals or impose on them. It is a fact that the leading bills in Congress would increase the power of government and decrease individual freedom. You cannot spend an additional $1 trillion of taxpayer money and reduce the role of government.
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NATIONAL
January 25, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - As brutally cold temperatures continue to blast much of the nation, a propane shortage is driving up heating bills, prompting accusations of price gouging and leading to energy emergencies in more than a dozen states, from Alabama to Michigan. The lack of propane has forced the closing of schools in Tennessee, led to calls for people to turn down their thermostats and given poultry farmers the shivers. "They're worried they might not be able to keep those chickens warm," said Jeff Helms of the Alabama Farmers Federation.
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OPINION
October 11, 2009 | DOYLE McMANUS
Late last month, as the Senate Finance Committee labored to produce its version of a healthcare bill, the Republican whip, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona, renewed an old warning. If the federal government intervenes to hold healthcare costs down, Kyl said, the result would be something nobody wants: rationing. "The federal bureaucrats would, in effect, reduce the payment to providers, forcing them to reduce the care," Kyl warned. "It's not the government directly that is actually rationing care; now, we wouldn't want to do that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Maura Dolan
SACRAMENTO - California Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye, flanked by legislative leaders and judges, warned Tuesday that Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed budget for the coming fiscal year would probably trigger more courthouse closures and layoffs in the state's beleaguered judicial branch. "We are rationing justice, and it has become more than a fiscal problem," Cantil-Sakauye said, standing in front of more than 30 judges, court administrators, union officials, business representatives and key state lawmakers at a news conference in Sacramento.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991
At the request of Supervisor Mike Antonovich, the county will consider amendments addressing what he believes are inequities in the water rationing plan approved in May. Under the plan, residents of unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County are supposed to cut water use to 80% of the district average during each comparable month in 1990. For heavy water users, such as large families and farms, the average might be unrealistically low, Antonovich said.
NEWS
April 24, 1988
Water rationing will be imposed on 1.1 million households in the east San Francisco Bay Area as a result of drought conditions, officials have announced. East Bay Municipal Water District officials said residents in much of Contra Costa and Alameda counties, beginning next month, will have to cut back water usage by 25% or have their rates increased. The largest impact will likely be felt in hotter, inland regions where people may see their yards dry up, a district spokesman said.
NEWS
January 25, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Officials today announced that the Soviet capital will ration meat, grain, vodka and wine in a stark acknowledgement that they expect the local economy of nearly worthless money and empty stores to worsen this winter. President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's decree taking 50- and 100-ruble notes out of circulation disrupted banks and commerce for a third day, and rumors swept the government of impending increases in state-controlled prices.
OPINION
January 4, 2003
Re "Rx for Universal Care," editorial, Dec. 29: Although every caring person agrees that the debate on universal care needs to be moved into the mainstream arena, considerable confusion remains. Should we build on the current system of employer-sponsored plans and public programs or should we replace them with a single-payer system? Although continuing to use private plans would perpetuate the tremendous administrative excesses that waste resources that should be directed to patient care, fewer public tax dollars would be required to expand coverage to everyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Supervisor Mike Antonovich asked Tuesday that the county Board of Supervisors end the mandatory water rationing program in county waterworks districts. The program, which required a 20% reduction, actually resulted in user cutbacks of more than 30%, according to Antonovich. Because of heavy winter rains and additional State Water Project deliveries, Antonovich said he would ask that mandatory rationing be replaced by a program calling for a voluntary reduction of 10%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 1990
City Council President John Ferraro on Tuesday said "there is a strong possibility" that Los Angeles will resort to water rationing this summer in the face of a projected 12% shortfall in water supplies. But Ferraro, following a council committee hearing on the Department of Water and Power's projections, said he does not believe that strict enforcement methods are necessary or cost-effective in saving water.
NEWS
December 27, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Southern Californians have been having a lot of fun on Facebook this past week posting weather reports that show the local temperatures well up into the 70s and even the 80s. The wording with it usually goes something like this: You poor idiots living in colder climates, don't you wish you were smart like I am and lived here instead? We might have reason to be less thrilled about all this balminess a few months from now. With no rain on the horizon, it's pretty safe to call 2013 the driest year on record in Los Angeles.
OPINION
December 13, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
The killing last December of 20 children and six adults at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., was expected to finally change this country's apathy toward gun control. It seemed impossible, after so many 6- and 7-year-olds cowering in their classrooms were methodically shot and killed by a young man armed with a military-style semiautomatic weapon, that the nation's leaders would not begin to limit access to tools of mass murder. But it didn't happen. A year later, on the first anniversary of the Newtown massacre, reasonable gun control legislation has been blocked in Congress and it's still far too easy to acquire a weapon that can kill a dozen people in seconds.
NEWS
July 29, 2013 | By Jon Healey
Republicans have said hyperbolic things about the 2010 healthcare law's Independent Payment Advisory Board so many times -- e.g., former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin's declaration that it's a " death panel " -- that I've gotten inured to it. Nevertheless, it was a little startling to see some of the same facts-be-damned assertions coming from a liberal Democrat on the op-ed page of the Wall Street Journal. Former Democratic Party Chairman Howard Dean took to the Journal on Monday to attack the IPAB with the same blatant mischaracterizations that have been the hallmarks of the GOP attacks.
OPINION
July 13, 2013
Re "Walking the climate tightrope," Opinion, July 9 Jody Freeman, a former White House lawyer, provides insights into the political and economic obstacles facing the regulation of greenhouse gases in the U.S., and why only the most tepid reforms are politically feasible. From my perspective as an instructor of climate science courses, alarm bells should be ringing. The climate of our planet is in mortal danger. The technology for mass conversion to renewable energy exists, and systemic change now would avoid the worst extremes of global warming.
OPINION
June 29, 2013
Re "Moral issues can't simply be ruled invalid," Opinion, June 27 Maggie Gallagher believes that Supreme Court Justice Anthony M. Kennedy's desire to write this generation's Brown vs. Board of Education with his majority opinion invalidating the Defense of Marriage Act is misplaced. If in fact this was Kennedy's desire, this is exactly the right case. Gallagher writes that Kennedy's decision subverts the will of the people. I wonder what the will of the people regarding integration was in 1954, when the court made its decision in Brown and struck down racial segregation in public schools.
OPINION
January 15, 2013 | By Michael Shermer
President Obama has vowed to do everything in his power to prevent another Sandy Hook. "Because what choice do we have?" he asked. "We can't accept events like this as routine. " Unfortunately, such events are far more random than they are routine. They are what the statistician Nassim Taleb calls "Black Swan events": improbable, rare and unpredictable. We will never be able to prevent them. But that does not mean we can do nothing in response. We should start by understanding the distinction between murder and mass murder.
NEWS
February 28, 1991 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
After hearing three hours of testimony from Bay Area businesses and water officials, the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission on Tuesday imposed the most severe water rationing in the city's history. The new measure includes bans on washing cars--except in a commercial carwash--and filling hot tubs or swimming pools in San Francisco. Watering golf courses will be outlawed, except for putting greens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1991
A group of Venice residents filed a federal legal challenge Tuesday to the city's water-rationing ordinance, saying that they don't know how much water they can use or how much they have to cut back. The 16 Ketch Homeowners Assn., a group of condominium owners from 16 Ketch St., asked U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson to immediately bar enforcement of the ordinance. Wilson's clerk said no hearing on the request has been scheduled.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2012 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK--Leslie Martin was never so happy to be odd. If only she'd known how to pump her own gas on the first day of rationing in New York and suburban Long Island. Still, Martin made do early Friday after waiting for hours in line as the state tries to manage the gasoline shortage resulting from station closures and fuel delivery problems in the wake of Hurricane Sandy. Because Friday, Nov. 9, is an odd number, only people like Martin, driving cars with license plates ending in odd numbers or characters, were allowed at the pumps.
NATIONAL
November 9, 2012 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Tina Susman, Los Angeles Times
SEA BRIGHT, N.J. - The residents of Sea Bright returned home Friday, some for the first time since Superstorm Sandy, and attempted to salvage what they could from apartments and houses still inundated with sand and salty water. Eleven days after the storm struck, seaside residents across New Jersey and New York continued their recovery-mode struggle, bedeviled with frustrating power outages, temporary housing and severe gasoline shortages that prompted New York rationing Friday. In Sea Bright, about 50 miles south of New York City, the main thoroughfare through town, Ocean Avenue, had been cleared of about 5 feet of sand, and earth movers were still slogging away Friday clearing debris.
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