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Ratko Mladic

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WORLD
May 27, 2011
Under an indictment last amended in November 2009, the U.N. war crimes tribunal has filed these charges against former Bosnian Serb military chief Gen. Ratko Mladic: • One count each of genocide in the town of Srebrenica and elsewhere in Bosnia-Herzegovina; complicity in genocide; persecutions on political, racial and religious grounds; extermination; deportation; unlawfully inflicting terror upon civilians; cruel treatment; attacks on civilians;...
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OPINION
July 11, 2012 | Sarah Kenyon Lischer, Sarah Kenyon Lischer, an associate professor in the Department of Politics and International Affairs at Wake Forest University, is the author of "Dangerous Sanctuaries: Refugee Camps, Civil War, and the Dilemmas of Humanitarian Aid."
'We give this town to the Serb nation.... The time has come to take revenge on the Turks. " Seventeen years later, the words still hang in the air like poison gas over Srebrenica. With that speech, Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic pronounced the death sentence on more than 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys. On July 11, 1995, the slaughter began. Bosnian Serb soldiers loyal to Mladic hunted down, tortured and killed the male inhabitants of Srebrenica in Bosnia and Herzegovina, which the United Nations had blithely declared a "safe area" for Muslim civilians.
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WORLD
May 26, 2011 | Times wire reports
The transfer of Gen. Ratko Mladic to the Hague will take place after the completion of judicial proceedings required by Serbian law, the U.N.-backed war crimes court said on Thursday. Under an indictment last amended in November 2009, the U.N. war crimes tribunal has filed these charges against former Bosnian Serb military chief Gen. Ratko Mladic: -- One count of genocide (in Srebrenica and elsewhere in Bosnia) -- One count of complicity in genocide -- One count of persecutions on political, racial and religious grounds, extermination, murder, deportation, crimes against humanity -- One count of murder, unlawfully inflicting terror upon civilians, cruel treatment, attacks on civilians, taking of hostages, violation of the laws or customs of war Excerpts from the U.N. war crimes tribunal indictment charging Gen. Ratko Mladic with genocide and crimes against humanity and violation of the laws or customs of war: -- "Acting individually or in concert with other participants in a joint criminal enterprise (JCE)
WORLD
May 17, 2012 | By Janet Stobart and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
LONDON — Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic confronted the accusations against him at the opening of his war crimes trial in The Hague on Wednesday with contemptuous gestures to the court and the victims who had come to see him face justice for atrocities during the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Slowed by age and the hardships of 15 years on the run from the indictment by the United Nations tribunal, Mladic still mustered a hint of his trademark swagger as...
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Henry Chu and Zoran Cirjakovic, Los Angeles Times
The arrest of Ratko Mladic, the Bosnian Serb general accused of overseeing Europe's worst massacre since World War II, is a milestone in Serbia's effort to end long years as a pariah, even as it renews disturbing questions about how he evaded capture for more than 15 years. Mladic commanded military forces that seized the town of Srebrenica, in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and butchered an estimated 8,000 Muslim men and boys, an atrocity now held up as a symbol of the brutality of the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Now 69 and said to be in poor health, Mladic is to be extradited to The Hague to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity.
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
A judge ruled Friday that captured war crimes suspect Ratko Mladic is fit for extradition to The Hague to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. Mladic now has three days to appeal the decision. Mladic's son, Darko, told reporters that his father was "very, very frail," with the right half of his body numbed. He called for independent medical experts to examine his 69-year-old father. Photos: Ratko Mladic The arrest of Mladic, the Bosnian Serb general accused of overseeing Europe's worst massacre since World War II, is a milestone in Serbia's effort to end long years as a pariah, even as it renews disturbing questions about how he evaded capture for more than 15 years.
WORLD
June 1, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The man accused of overseeing the worst massacre of civilians in Europe since World War II was flown to The Hague on Tuesday for trial after judges rejected his argument that he was too frail to be extradited. Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb general, was bundled onto a plane in Belgrade, the Serbian capital, late Tuesday afternoon to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity for his part in the savage ethnic cleansing campaigns of the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic's lawyer had tried to prevent his transfer on the grounds that the onetime military commander, 69, had suffered at least two strokes and was too mentally clouded to stand trial.
WORLD
May 26, 2011 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
Witnesses die. Memories fade. Victims move on with their lives, leaving no forwarding addresses. The passage of nearly two decades since the most heinous crimes attributed to Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic could impede his prosecution at the U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, legal analysts say. But those familiar with Mladic's alleged role in the worst atrocities to afflict Europe since the Nazis insist his conviction is assured despite...
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
If Ratko Mladic is extradited on charges of mass murder, as even he now seems to believe is inevitable, his own words may come back to haunt him. Thousands of them. Prosecutors at the war crimes tribunal in The Hague are combing through a trove of diaries and audio recordings kept by the Bosnian Serb general throughout the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic was an obsessive record-keeper, jotting down notes from even the briefest conversations. The habit was evidence, some say, of an outsize personality convinced of its own importance.
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Tracy Wilkinson, Los Angeles Times
Shortly before the slaughter, Gen. Ratko Mladic patted the boys on their heads and offered them candy. He told the adults being herded in the city of Srebrenica that everything would be all right. Within days, Mladic's troops, said to be acting on his orders, had killed about 8,000 of Srebrenica's men and boys, lining them up, opening fire and dumping their bodies in mass graves; many of the women were raped. It was this chilling cynicism that marked Mladic, in the words of a former NATO officer, a world-class war criminal.
WORLD
July 5, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
War crimes suspect Ratko Mladic was thrown out of court Monday at The Hague after he shouted in protest and refused to hear the allegations against him. The court entered a not-guilty plea on his behalf to charges that he oversaw unspeakable acts of genocide during the 1992-95 Balkans conflict. "I'm not going to listen anymore. You're talking in vain," a contemptuous Mladic told the International Criminal Court as the presiding judge began reading out the counts against him. As the former Bosnian Serb general pulled off his headphones and continued to hurl abuse, the judge asked security officers to remove him from the courtroom.
WORLD
June 5, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
He's everything his country wants to be: confident, successful, comfortable in his own skin and able, at last, to put a violent past behind him. It's not often that a tennis star embodies the hopes of an entire nation. But in Novak Djokovic — the world's No. 2 men's player, whose perfect win streak this year was finally snapped here Friday at the French Open — Serbia has found what it thinks is the perfect pitchman for a rebranding campaign, someone who'll bring back the shine to its tarnished reputation.
OPINION
June 2, 2011 | By Timothy Garton Ash
At last they've got him. That Ratko Mladic is now sitting in the detention cell of an international tribunal in The Hague is a cause for unqualified celebration. The man directly responsible for the massacre of some 8,000 unarmed men and boys at Srebrenica will be held to account for that and other atrocities. This is another step forward in one of the great developments of our time: the global movement toward accountability. Just over 60 years ago, Czeslaw Milosz wrote a poem addressed to the torturers and mass murderers.
WORLD
June 1, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The man accused of overseeing the worst massacre of civilians in Europe since World War II was flown to The Hague on Tuesday for trial after judges rejected his argument that he was too frail to be extradited. Ratko Mladic, the former Bosnian Serb general, was bundled onto a plane in Belgrade, the Serbian capital, late Tuesday afternoon to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity for his part in the savage ethnic cleansing campaigns of the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic's lawyer had tried to prevent his transfer on the grounds that the onetime military commander, 69, had suffered at least two strokes and was too mentally clouded to stand trial.
WORLD
May 30, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of supporters of war crimes suspect Ratko Mladic rallied Sunday to protest the arrest of the man whom they revere as a national hero but whom much of the West considers a mass murderer. Ultranationalists, government foes and rowdy soccer fans gathered in front of the parliament building in downtown Belgrade to wave Serbian flags and denounce Mladic's capture and expected extradition this week to The Hague to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. As darkness fell, a few clashes broke out as demonstrators threw rocks at riot police, who were deployed in large numbers throughout the city center and around Western embassies.
WORLD
May 29, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
If Ratko Mladic is extradited on charges of mass murder, as even he now seems to believe is inevitable, his own words may come back to haunt him. Thousands of them. Prosecutors at the war crimes tribunal in The Hague are combing through a trove of diaries and audio recordings kept by the Bosnian Serb general throughout the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Mladic was an obsessive record-keeper, jotting down notes from even the briefest conversations. The habit was evidence, some say, of an outsize personality convinced of its own importance.
WORLD
May 17, 2012 | By Janet Stobart and Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
LONDON — Bosnian Serb Gen. Ratko Mladic confronted the accusations against him at the opening of his war crimes trial in The Hague on Wednesday with contemptuous gestures to the court and the victims who had come to see him face justice for atrocities during the 1992-95 Bosnian war. Slowed by age and the hardships of 15 years on the run from the indictment by the United Nations tribunal, Mladic still mustered a hint of his trademark swagger as...
WORLD
May 30, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Thousands of supporters of war crimes suspect Ratko Mladic rallied Sunday to protest the arrest of the man whom they revere as a national hero but whom much of the West considers a mass murderer. Ultranationalists, government foes and rowdy soccer fans gathered in front of the parliament building in downtown Belgrade to wave Serbian flags and denounce Mladic's capture and expected extradition this week to The Hague to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. As darkness fell, a few clashes broke out as demonstrators threw rocks at riot police, who were deployed in large numbers throughout the city center and around Western embassies.
WORLD
May 28, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
Jovana Vujcic is too young to remember the war that ravaged the Balkans in the early 1990s but old enough now to experience its baleful legacy. "We're labeled as a genocide nation," the 23-year-old Serbian economics student said. "When you travel around Europe and you meet people, they only know those years of our history. " The burden of that past felt a little lighter Friday, a day after Serbian authorities finally captured Ratko Mladic , Europe's most-wanted war crimes suspect.
WORLD
May 27, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
A judge ruled Friday that captured war crimes suspect Ratko Mladic is fit for extradition to The Hague to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. Mladic now has three days to appeal the decision. Mladic's son, Darko, told reporters that his father was "very, very frail," with the right half of his body numbed. He called for independent medical experts to examine his 69-year-old father. Photos: Ratko Mladic The arrest of Mladic, the Bosnian Serb general accused of overseeing Europe's worst massacre since World War II, is a milestone in Serbia's effort to end long years as a pariah, even as it renews disturbing questions about how he evaded capture for more than 15 years.
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