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Ratu Josefa Iloilo

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NEWS
July 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Fiji's new president, a frail and elderly tribal chief, was sworn in today and urged reconciliation in the ethnically divided island nation that had been paralyzed by a two-month hostage crisis. Ratu Josefa Iloilo took the oath of office in a stately residence overlooking the harbor of the capital, Suva, before an audience that included nationalist coup leader George Speight.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2011
Len Lesser Veteran character actor Len Lesser, 88, a veteran character actor best known for his recurring role in the 1990s as Uncle Leo on the hit NBC-TV comedy "Seinfeld," died Wednesday in Burbank, publicist Laura Stegman said. He had pneumonia and cancer. Starting in the early 1950s, Lesser built a reputation for mostly playing the heavy in dozens of movies and hundreds of TV appearances, while nurturing his love of the theater. But the bald, hook-nosed actor took his career to a higher plane once he established himself as Jerry Seinfeld's annoying Uncle Leo with his trademark greeting "Hello!"
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2011
Len Lesser Veteran character actor Len Lesser, 88, a veteran character actor best known for his recurring role in the 1990s as Uncle Leo on the hit NBC-TV comedy "Seinfeld," died Wednesday in Burbank, publicist Laura Stegman said. He had pneumonia and cancer. Starting in the early 1950s, Lesser built a reputation for mostly playing the heavy in dozens of movies and hundreds of TV appearances, while nurturing his love of the theater. But the bald, hook-nosed actor took his career to a higher plane once he established himself as Jerry Seinfeld's annoying Uncle Leo with his trademark greeting "Hello!"
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Fiji's new president, a frail and elderly tribal chief, was sworn in today and urged reconciliation in the ethnically divided island nation that had been paralyzed by a two-month hostage crisis. Ratu Josefa Iloilo took the oath of office in a stately residence overlooking the harbor of the capital, Suva, before an audience that included nationalist coup leader George Speight.
WORLD
April 10, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The president assumed control and fired the judges who a day earlier had declared the South Pacific island's military government illegal. President Ratu Josefa Iloilo announced in a nationally broadcast radio address that he had abolished the constitution, assumed all governing power and revoked all judicial appointments. "I hereby confirm I have abrogated the 1997 constitution and appointed myself as head of state in the new order," he said.
NEWS
July 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
Captors tearfully hugged captives in an emotional end Thursday to a two-month parliamentary hostage crisis that inflamed ethnic tensions in Fiji and ravaged the South Pacific nation's crucial tourist industry. Hours after the release of the last 18 hostages seized by rebels May 19, the Great Council of Chiefs--Fiji's traditional power--elected Ratu Josefa Iloilo as the country's president. Iloilo was rebel leader George Speight's handpicked nominee.
WORLD
April 11, 2009 | Associated Press
Fiji's armed forces chief returned to power as this troubled country's prime minister early today, a day after the president suspended the constitution and fired the judges who had declared the military leader's government illegal. President Ratu Josefa Iloilo also declared a 30-day state of emergency, limiting freedom of speech, expanding police powers and curbing news reporting.
NEWS
June 11, 2000 | From Associated Press
A mob armed with sugar-cane-cutting knives torched a seaside restaurant late Saturday--the latest violence near Fiji's Parliament, where armed rebels are holding 31 hostages. Firefighters rushed past military checkpoints to get to the blaze, which gutted the Lighthouse Cafe on the edge of Suva harbor. There were no injuries, and the violent crowd, made up of supporters of rebel leader George Speight, did not confront the army, which was manning roadblocks nearby, military spokesman Lt. Col.
NEWS
June 22, 2000 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first night wasn't so bad. The young men came, shouted a few insults, threw some rocks, broke a couple of windows. And then, just as quickly as they had emerged from the darkness, they slipped away. It was the second night that Shiri and Veena Devi Ram will never forget. The troublemakers began congregating in front of their house in the late afternoon. There were about 30 of them, young indigenous Fijians from a nearby village, drinking beer and bent on trouble. "Get out!"
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