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NEWS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Raul Ramirez on Tuesday announced his resignation from the bench, citing low morale among federal judges and the decaying quality of the judiciary caused by overwork and low pay. Choking back tears at one point, Ramirez, 45, said that he will become a partner in the business law firm of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, which has offices in California and New York.
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NEWS
November 1, 1989 | From Associated Press
U.S. District Judge Raul Ramirez on Tuesday announced his resignation from the bench, citing low morale among federal judges and the decaying quality of the judiciary caused by overwork and low pay. Choking back tears at one point, Ramirez, 45, said that he will become a partner in the business law firm of Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe, which has offices in California and New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1986 | From Associated Press
The Supreme Court on Monday agreed to decide whether the government may label as "political propaganda" three Canadian films on acid rain and nuclear war. The justices said they will hear a Reagan Administration appeal of a ruling that the classification violates free-speech rights protected by the Constitution. The court is not expected to announce a decision until sometime in 1987. "No issue of censorship is involved in this case," Justice Department lawyers argued in the government's appeal.
NEWS
April 28, 1987 | Associated Press
The Supreme Court ruled today that the Reagan Administration may label as "political propaganda" three Canadian films on acid rain and nuclear war. By a 5-3 vote, the justices said the label is used "in a neutral and evenhanded manner" and is not intended as censorship. Justice John Paul Stevens, in his opinion for the court, said the federal law authorizing use of the classification for foreign-produced works "has no pejorative connotation."
NEWS
June 10, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, Times Staff Writer
In a plea bargain with federal prosecutors, an Egyptian-born rocket scientist pleaded guilty Friday to attempting to smuggle out highly sophisticated missile components to the military of his native country. As Abdelkader Helmy switched his plea to guilty to a single charge in a multicount indictment, U.S. District Judge Raul A. Ramirez noted that Helmy may be required to testify against unspecified officials of the Egyptian government. During questioning of Helmy, the jurist told him, without elaboration, "You could be called on to testify against agents and high-ranking authorities of the Egyptian government."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1986 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Times Staff Writer
Justice Department Tag of Canadian Works as 'Political Propaganda' Is Upheld in Opinion Written by Reagan Nominee to Supreme Court A Washington federal appeals court said Friday that the Justice Department may label as "political propaganda" three Canadian films dealing with the subjects of nuclear war and acid rain. In a 26-page opinion written by Judge Antonin Scalia, whom President Reagan nominated to the U.S.
NEWS
April 29, 1987 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, Times Staff Writer
The government may officially label foreign films as "political propaganda," the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday, concluding that a 1942 law designed to track subversive information coming into the country does not limit the right to free speech. On a 5-3 vote, the high court said that Reagan Administration officials acted legally when they used the law to designate as "propaganda" three Canadian government films on acid rain and nuclear war.
SPORTS
August 11, 1989 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
After considering more than 65 candidates for commissioner earlier this summer, National Football League club owners are now interviewing still others. They are declining to name names, but many of the original candidates are still on the list. This week's developments, through Thursday: --Some of the leading figures in corporate America have been, or will be, contacted at the request of Heidrick and Struggles, the New York search firm employed by the NFL at a cost of $200,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1990 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors asked Tuesday that Richard T. Silberman's $500,000 bond be revoked, saying that there was "no reason" to believe that the prominent San Diego businessman, who disappeared last week for two days, would show up for his upcoming money-laundering trial. In legal papers that shed light on Silberman's trail during the two days after he vanished from San Diego and before he was found unconscious in a Las Vegas hotel room, prosecutors also demanded that Silberman see a psychiatrist.
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