Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRaul Alcala
IN THE NEWS

Raul Alcala

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
May 12, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
With a last-second surge, Malcolm Elliott of Great Britain won his 10th race of the year, and overall leader Raul Alcala maintained his 22-second margin during the leisurely sixth stage of the Tour DuPont, a 120.8-mile Massanutten Resort-to-Richmond, Va. road race. Alcala, 29, finished 82nd in the main field, 38 seconds behind the leaders, for the lead over Lance Armstrong with five stages to go.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 12, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
With a last-second surge, Malcolm Elliott of Great Britain won his 10th race of the year, and overall leader Raul Alcala maintained his 22-second margin during the leisurely sixth stage of the Tour DuPont, a 120.8-mile Massanutten Resort-to-Richmond, Va. road race. Alcala, 29, finished 82nd in the main field, 38 seconds behind the leaders, for the lead over Lance Armstrong with five stages to go.
Advertisement
SPORTS
July 3, 1989 | From Times wire services
Raul Alcala became the first Mexican to win a stage of the Tour de France as he captured the third leg today as Portugal's Acacio da Silva retained the leader's yellow jersey. The 25-year-old Alcala, competing in his fourth Tour de France, started his professional career at the world's most famous cycling race in 1986. He was timed in 6 hours, 34 minutes, 7 seconds for the 150-mile leg.
SPORTS
May 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Raul Alcala of Mexico thought he would use the Tour de Trump to get into shape until he realized he could win. Alcala, who lives and trains in Switzerland, concluded 11 days of consistent and strategic racing Sunday by winning the race by 43 seconds. "I came into the race only to train," Alcala said. "But I won the prologue, so I knew there was a chance to win. "It was a hard race. I never saw any flat roads, it was always up and down." Alcala, 26, said he began cycling when he was 10.
SPORTS
August 13, 1987 | United Press International
Mike Engleman of Santa Cruz rode alone for the last 35 miles Wednesday to win the 120-mile Nevada City-to-Squaw Valley road race, the eighth stage of the Coors International bicycle race. Engleman, 29, a former long-distance runner who began competitive cycling 18 months ago, became the first U.S. cyclist to win during the 19-stage, 1,400-mile event. His time was 5 hours 29 minutes 46 seconds. "The first few surges hurt," said Engleman, who in 1980 placed 48th in the Boston Marathon.
SPORTS
August 21, 1987 | From Associated Press
Raul Alcala became the men's leader in the Coors International bicycle race Thursday, taking the honor from 7-Eleven teammate Jeff Pierce in the Golden-to-Estes Park road race. In the women's division, Jeannie Longo of France held her commanding lead by finishing first in the women's seventh stage, the Estes Park circuit race.
SPORTS
July 7, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Christophe Lavainne of France broke away 22 miles from the finish to win Monday's 105-mile sixth stage of the Tour de France bicycle race. Lavainne, whose time was 4 hours 12 minutes 57 seconds, was closely pursued by Raul Alcala of Mexico, who turned in the best performance ever by a Mexican rider in the Tour by finishing second, 99 seconds behind. Switzerland's Erich Maechler, the leader since Saturday, retained the overall No.
SPORTS
August 12, 1986 | Associated Press
Bruno Cornillet of France, who, after 102 miles, got lost seconds before the finish line Monday, was declared the winner of the Sonoma-Sacramento leg of the Coors International bicycle race. The judges ruled that the Cornillet, 23, of the Peugeot Team, won the race even though he crossed the finish line fifth. The first cyclist to finish was Greg LeMond, this year's Tour de France winner, with an unofficial time of 3:58:53.
SPORTS
May 14, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Raul Alcala of Mexico thought he would use the Tour de Trump to get into shape until he realized he could win. Alcala, who lives and trains in Switzerland, concluded 11 days of consistent and strategic racing Sunday by winning the race by 43 seconds. "I came into the race only to train," Alcala said. "But I won the prologue, so I knew there was a chance to win. "It was a hard race. I never saw any flat roads, it was always up and down." Alcala, 26, said he began cycling when he was 10.
SPORTS
August 20, 1987 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
The powerful 7-Eleven cycling team, which set out to make the United States a world-class force in bicycle racing, may inadvertently be undermining the Coors International, America's premier race. It is a simple case of overkill. The Southland Corp.'s convenience store chain corralled so many of this country's top riders that competition in this year's Coors 19-stage race has become a joke. There have been 15 stages since the 1,376-mile event started Aug. 5 in Hawaii.
SPORTS
July 3, 1989 | From Times wire services
Raul Alcala became the first Mexican to win a stage of the Tour de France as he captured the third leg today as Portugal's Acacio da Silva retained the leader's yellow jersey. The 25-year-old Alcala, competing in his fourth Tour de France, started his professional career at the world's most famous cycling race in 1986. He was timed in 6 hours, 34 minutes, 7 seconds for the 150-mile leg.
SPORTS
August 21, 1987 | From Associated Press
Raul Alcala became the men's leader in the Coors International bicycle race Thursday, taking the honor from 7-Eleven teammate Jeff Pierce in the Golden-to-Estes Park road race. In the women's division, Jeannie Longo of France held her commanding lead by finishing first in the women's seventh stage, the Estes Park circuit race.
SPORTS
August 20, 1987 | SHAV GLICK, Times Staff Writer
The powerful 7-Eleven cycling team, which set out to make the United States a world-class force in bicycle racing, may inadvertently be undermining the Coors International, America's premier race. It is a simple case of overkill. The Southland Corp.'s convenience store chain corralled so many of this country's top riders that competition in this year's Coors 19-stage race has become a joke. There have been 15 stages since the 1,376-mile event started Aug. 5 in Hawaii.
SPORTS
August 13, 1987 | United Press International
Mike Engleman of Santa Cruz rode alone for the last 35 miles Wednesday to win the 120-mile Nevada City-to-Squaw Valley road race, the eighth stage of the Coors International bicycle race. Engleman, 29, a former long-distance runner who began competitive cycling 18 months ago, became the first U.S. cyclist to win during the 19-stage, 1,400-mile event. His time was 5 hours 29 minutes 46 seconds. "The first few surges hurt," said Engleman, who in 1980 placed 48th in the Boston Marathon.
SPORTS
July 7, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Christophe Lavainne of France broke away 22 miles from the finish to win Monday's 105-mile sixth stage of the Tour de France bicycle race. Lavainne, whose time was 4 hours 12 minutes 57 seconds, was closely pursued by Raul Alcala of Mexico, who turned in the best performance ever by a Mexican rider in the Tour by finishing second, 99 seconds behind. Switzerland's Erich Maechler, the leader since Saturday, retained the overall No.
SPORTS
August 12, 1986 | Associated Press
Bruno Cornillet of France, who, after 102 miles, got lost seconds before the finish line Monday, was declared the winner of the Sonoma-Sacramento leg of the Coors International bicycle race. The judges ruled that the Cornillet, 23, of the Peugeot Team, won the race even though he crossed the finish line fifth. The first cyclist to finish was Greg LeMond, this year's Tour de France winner, with an unofficial time of 3:58:53.
SPORTS
May 11, 1993 | From Associated Press
Lance Armstrong took advantage of team strategy to win the first mountain stage, and Raul Alcala surged past tiring teammate Jelle Nijdam of the Netherlands into the overall lead in the Tour DuPont.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|