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Raul Anguiano

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2006 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Raul Anguiano, eclectic Mexican painter, sculptor and muralist who worked with well-known post-revolutionary artists Jose Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera, has died. He was 90. Anguiano died Friday at Hospital Central Militar in Mexico City of heart problems. He had become ill in Los Angeles, where he had a second home in Huntington Beach, and asked his wife, Brigita, to take him home to Mexico.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 16, 2006 | Myrna Oliver, Times Staff Writer
Raul Anguiano, eclectic Mexican painter, sculptor and muralist who worked with well-known post-revolutionary artists Jose Clemente Orozco, David Alfaro Siqueiros and Diego Rivera, has died. He was 90. Anguiano died Friday at Hospital Central Militar in Mexico City of heart problems. He had become ill in Los Angeles, where he had a second home in Huntington Beach, and asked his wife, Brigita, to take him home to Mexico.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Gallery director Scott Canty was slow to admit it, but the retrospective of works by Mexican artist Raul Anguiano at ArtSpace Gallery in Woodland Hills may mark a significant step for the young gallery. After all, since it came under the direction of the city's Cultural Affairs Department last September, ArtSpace has focused on thematic group shows of Los Angeles-area artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002 | MANUEL GAMIZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a few strokes of charcoal, some swipes of red and green paint and memories from his past, Raul Anguiano tells an intertwining history of Mexican art, Mayan culture and his own life. "This is a universal language," says the soft-spoken 86-year-old artist from Guadalajara. "Art is the way that I have always expressed myself to the world." Since August, Anguiano could be found giving history lessons in the East Los Angeles College auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
Mexican muralist Raul Anguiano is being reintroduced to Southern California on his 70th birthday in an exhibition at East Los Angeles College. Though his work has been featured in solo shows here and his "Creation of Man" mural occupies a prominent place in Mexico City's National Museum of Anthropology, his name is far less familiar than those of his contemporaries--Rivera, Orozco and Siqueiros.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2002 | MANUEL GAMIZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a few strokes of charcoal, some swipes of red and green paint and memories from his past, Raul Anguiano tells an intertwining history of Mexican art, Mayan culture and his own life. "This is a universal language," says the soft-spoken 86-year-old artist from Guadalajara. "Art is the way that I have always expressed myself to the world." Since August, Anguiano could be found giving history lessons in the East Los Angeles College auditorium.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2003 | Ann Conway, Times Staff Writer
Serenaded by mariachis, supporters of Theatre of Hearts/Youth First streamed into the Consulate General of Mexico to preview the artwork of at-risk children from Los Angeles and Oaxaca. Sipping icy Coronas and sampling taco and ceviche appetizers, more than 300 guests cruised the photographs, mono-prints, ceramics, oils and acrylics -- some for sale, others part of the nonprofit organization's permanent collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2001
ANAHEIM 8 p.m. Pop Music Here's an intriguing concept: Take the songs of progressive rock group Pink Floyd and cast them with a blues tint. That's the idea behind Blue Floyd, which plays in Anaheim on Sunday on a bill with another '70s relic, Quicksilver Messenger Service. Once you think about it, Blue Floyd isn't such a huge stretch. Floydians Syd Barrett and Roger Waters often had a blues thread in their music. Remember the bluesy break in their 1973 hit "Money"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scenes of the Mayans dance on Mexican artist Raul Anguiano's 16-foot mural. To the left is a feathered serpent beside the face of a holy priest and the God of Death. To the right is an image of the Lacandon Indians, a remnant Maya population living in the forests of Chiapas, Mexico. Painted in the brilliant colors of the Yucatan Peninsula and Chiapas, the mural, titled "The Mayas: Magic, Science and the History of the Maya," is the newest arrival at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN
Inspiring young minds to appreciate art is a challenge Mexican artist Raul Anguiano is willing to take. Anguiano is spending part of his summer teaching third-graders in the Santa Ana Unified School District how to draw and paint. His volunteer work in the classroom is part of the inaugural program supported by the Barrutia Family Fund, an endowment of nearly $100,000 established in July 1999 to integrate the cultural arts into inner-city school curricula.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 1990 | STEVE APPLEFORD
Gallery director Scott Canty was slow to admit it, but the retrospective of works by Mexican artist Raul Anguiano at ArtSpace Gallery in Woodland Hills may mark a significant step for the young gallery. After all, since it came under the direction of the city's Cultural Affairs Department last September, ArtSpace has focused on thematic group shows of Los Angeles-area artists.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Staff Writer
Mexican muralist Raul Anguiano is being reintroduced to Southern California on his 70th birthday in an exhibition at East Los Angeles College. Though his work has been featured in solo shows here and his "Creation of Man" mural occupies a prominent place in Mexico City's National Museum of Anthropology, his name is far less familiar than those of his contemporaries--Rivera, Orozco and Siqueiros.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 1987 | MIKE GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
For four decades, Javier Escobar has labored for the foreign service of Mexico's government. And never has he seen a "border relationship" as peculiar as the one shared by San Diego and Tijuana. Border areas such as those shared by El Paso and Juarez, Laredo and Nuevo Laredo, Brownsville and Matamoros, have much more in common, Escobar said--especially awareness of each other's culture. Cross-cultural exchanges in such environments tend to flourish rather than wilt, he said.
NEWS
July 21, 1999 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Barrutia, internationally known linguist, a founding professor at UC Irvine and an expert on bilingual education, has died at the age of 72. Barrutia, also a noted amateur artist and arts patron, died July 6 in Corona del Mar. After teaching Peace Corps members Portuguese to work in Brazil and conducting National Defense Education Act workshops in Ecuador, Barrutia became a founding faculty member at UC Irvine in 1965.
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