Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRaul Malo
IN THE NEWS

Raul Malo

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2009 | Randy Lewis
In the midst of what essentially was a dance party Thursday night at the House of Blues in West Hollywood, singer Raul Malo set down the twangy guitar he'd been strumming joyfully for an hour, dismissed the members of his five-piece band -- except for pianist Chris Tuttle -- and stood practically motionless at the mike.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
This Saturday at the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, the Mavericks will make their first bona-fide concert appearance in nearly seven years. The show by the revered and genre-defying band is being billed as a reunion and constitutes one of the marquee special facets of this year's festival in the desert. It's also a standout moment for the band, whose members are coming back together after a turbulent career run that began with a rewarding string of albums and singles in the '90s but ended in frustration when their label dropped them and the group disbanded.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007 | Ann Powers, Times Staff Writer
BRET MICHAELS makes a tiny vocal gesture in Poison's new version of the Cars classic "Just What I Needed" that says a lot about pop-metal, the style he helped invent. The song is about the strange pleasure of having a lover walk all over you; Cars mastermind Ric Ocasek sang it with an eyebrow perplexedly arched. But with guitarist C.C. DeVille's proletarian hot-dogging replacing the chilliness of Cars keyboardist Greg Hawkes, Poison makes the song dirty, not distanced.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2009 | Randy Lewis
In the midst of what essentially was a dance party Thursday night at the House of Blues in West Hollywood, singer Raul Malo set down the twangy guitar he'd been strumming joyfully for an hour, dismissed the members of his five-piece band -- except for pianist Chris Tuttle -- and stood practically motionless at the mike.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
This Saturday at the Stagecoach Country Music Festival in Indio, the Mavericks will make their first bona-fide concert appearance in nearly seven years. The show by the revered and genre-defying band is being billed as a reunion and constitutes one of the marquee special facets of this year's festival in the desert. It's also a standout moment for the band, whose members are coming back together after a turbulent career run that began with a rewarding string of albums and singles in the '90s but ended in frustration when their label dropped them and the group disbanded.
NEWS
May 3, 2007
RAUL MALO: When Raul Malo sings, the clouds open, the green grass sparkles and dreams do come true. OK, not really. But the former Mavericks frontman does have one of the most memorable voices of the last dozen years. His forthcoming album, "After Hours," features such countrypolitan classics as "Welcome to My World," but for this set he'll surely throw in some of the Latin-flavored stuff that's deep in his Cuban American genes. (Palomino Stage, 4:50 p.m. Saturday)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2001 | Marc Weingarten
As the singer and main songwriter for the Mavericks during the band's '90s run, Raul Malo pushed commercial country into eclectic territory by folding all manner of American vernacular music into the mix. By the end of the decade, however, it became painfully obvious that the band was uneasily trying to wedge itself into radio's love-song ghetto, and it produced diminishing returns artistically. As Malo's L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | CASEY DOLAN
"CMT's 100 Greatest Love Songs" Raul Malo www.youtube.com/watch? v=IaN-9gXxqg4 Raul Malo, the former frontman for the Mavericks, delves into a medley of classic country ballads and delivers the heroic goods. Such is Malo's Naugahyde-and-bourbon authenticity that the listener could be pardoned for imagining a TV commercial touting a CD for the hits of 1963.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Don't scoff at anyone who tells you he spent three hours in hillbilly heaven this week. The House of Blues may not be scruffy enough to qualify as a true honky-tonk, but the marathon performances of the Mavericks and Junior Brown on Thursday night offered about as satisfying a display of classic '40s-'60s country music as you'll find short of an actual Hank Williams/Ernest Tubb reunion up above.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2006 | RANDY LEWIS
On his second solo album (in stores today), the former lead singer of the Mavericks seems utterly dedicated to resurrecting the kind of romantic pop music that Frank Sinatra long personified. But instead of focusing on the Great American Songbook and the pre-rock camp of composers, Malo zeroes in on songs and writers he grew up admiring, from Willie Nelson and Randy Newman to the Bee Gees and Harry Nilsson.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2007 | Ann Powers, Times Staff Writer
BRET MICHAELS makes a tiny vocal gesture in Poison's new version of the Cars classic "Just What I Needed" that says a lot about pop-metal, the style he helped invent. The song is about the strange pleasure of having a lover walk all over you; Cars mastermind Ric Ocasek sang it with an eyebrow perplexedly arched. But with guitarist C.C. DeVille's proletarian hot-dogging replacing the chilliness of Cars keyboardist Greg Hawkes, Poison makes the song dirty, not distanced.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2007 | CASEY DOLAN
"CMT's 100 Greatest Love Songs" Raul Malo www.youtube.com/watch? v=IaN-9gXxqg4 Raul Malo, the former frontman for the Mavericks, delves into a medley of classic country ballads and delivers the heroic goods. Such is Malo's Naugahyde-and-bourbon authenticity that the listener could be pardoned for imagining a TV commercial touting a CD for the hits of 1963.
NEWS
May 3, 2007
RAUL MALO: When Raul Malo sings, the clouds open, the green grass sparkles and dreams do come true. OK, not really. But the former Mavericks frontman does have one of the most memorable voices of the last dozen years. His forthcoming album, "After Hours," features such countrypolitan classics as "Welcome to My World," but for this set he'll surely throw in some of the Latin-flavored stuff that's deep in his Cuban American genes. (Palomino Stage, 4:50 p.m. Saturday)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2006 | RANDY LEWIS
On his second solo album (in stores today), the former lead singer of the Mavericks seems utterly dedicated to resurrecting the kind of romantic pop music that Frank Sinatra long personified. But instead of focusing on the Great American Songbook and the pre-rock camp of composers, Malo zeroes in on songs and writers he grew up admiring, from Willie Nelson and Randy Newman to the Bee Gees and Harry Nilsson.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 14, 2001 | Marc Weingarten
As the singer and main songwriter for the Mavericks during the band's '90s run, Raul Malo pushed commercial country into eclectic territory by folding all manner of American vernacular music into the mix. By the end of the decade, however, it became painfully obvious that the band was uneasily trying to wedge itself into radio's love-song ghetto, and it produced diminishing returns artistically. As Malo's L.A.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, Randy Lewis is a Times staff writer
About two years ago, Raul Malo was in the midst of a career crisis, so the lead singer and songwriter for the boundary-bending rock-country-pop band the Mavericks made a visit to a guru, and it shook him to the core. "When I left there I thought, 'You know what? We know nothing. We don't know a thing ,"' the 35-year-old musician says in the gravest of tones. "He's seen it all, he does it all." Yes, Malo found religion, but not in a Tibetan monastery nor under a revival tent down South.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2001 | RANDY LEWIS, Randy Lewis is a Times staff writer
About two years ago, Raul Malo was in the midst of a career crisis, so the lead singer and songwriter for the boundary-bending rock-country-pop band the Mavericks made a visit to a guru, and it shook him to the core. "When I left there I thought, 'You know what? We know nothing. We don't know a thing ,"' the 35-year-old musician says in the gravest of tones. "He's seen it all, he does it all." Yes, Malo found religion, but not in a Tibetan monastery nor under a revival tent down South.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1994 | RANDY LEWIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's 4:30 p.m. and the Mavericks are in the middle of a sound check at In Cahoots country nightclub. Sound check is the time when a band's main order of business is to be sure the stage monitors are on, that the bass drum doesn't overpower the guitars in the house sound system, and that all the microphones are plugged in.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1995 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Don't scoff at anyone who tells you he spent three hours in hillbilly heaven this week. The House of Blues may not be scruffy enough to qualify as a true honky-tonk, but the marathon performances of the Mavericks and Junior Brown on Thursday night offered about as satisfying a display of classic '40s-'60s country music as you'll find short of an actual Hank Williams/Ernest Tubb reunion up above.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|