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Raul Manglapus

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NEWS
July 27, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raul S. Manglapus, a Philippine nationalist who organized Filipinos in the United States against Ferdinand Marcos and later became his country's foreign minister under President Corazon Aquino, died Sunday at his home near Manila. He was 80 and had suffered from cancer. Manglapus was on a speaking engagement in California in 1972 when Marcos declared martial law in the island nation. During his 13-year exile, he founded the Movement for a Free Philippines and was, with Benigno S. Aquino Jr.
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NEWS
July 27, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raul S. Manglapus, a Philippine nationalist who organized Filipinos in the United States against Ferdinand Marcos and later became his country's foreign minister under President Corazon Aquino, died Sunday at his home near Manila. He was 80 and had suffered from cancer. Manglapus was on a speaking engagement in California in 1972 when Marcos declared martial law in the island nation. During his 13-year exile, he founded the Movement for a Free Philippines and was, with Benigno S. Aquino Jr.
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NEWS
December 22, 1988
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and his Philippine counterpart, Raul Manglapus, discussed offers to reduce Soviet troop strength in Asia and ways to improve bilateral relations during the Soviet official's 24-hour visit to Manila. Shevardnadze, who is to meet President Corazon Aquino today, described the talks as "very interesting" and "very substantive." He arrived Wednesday from Tokyo and is scheduled to leave later today for Communist North Korea.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bizarre story worthy of a spy thriller, the Philippine foreign secretary Thursday denied allegations that he hired an American mercenary, a minor figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, to assassinate rebel leaders trying to overthrow President Corazon Aquino. Raul Manglapus, at times visibly shaken, told a crowded news conference that a tape recording in which he allegedly discussed the murder plot was an elaborate hoax.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An American who once worked as a mercenary for the Contras in Nicaragua said he was hired in 1990 by Raul Manglapus, the foreign secretary of the Philippines, to kill a rebel leader who opposes President Corazon Aquino. The assassination never took place, but Jack Terrell said in an interview on ABC-TV that he decided to make the story public because he believes that it eventually would surface. Terrell said he was hired for $30,000 to organize a squad to kill Lt. Col.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a bizarre story worthy of a spy thriller, the Philippine foreign secretary Thursday denied allegations that he hired an American mercenary, a minor figure in the Iran-Contra scandal, to assassinate rebel leaders trying to overthrow President Corazon Aquino. Raul Manglapus, at times visibly shaken, told a crowded news conference that a tape recording in which he allegedly discussed the murder plot was an elaborate hoax.
OPINION
May 7, 1989 | Stanley Karnow, Stanley Karnow's new book, "In Our Image: America's Empire in the Philippines" (Random House), is companion to a three-part PBS television series beginning Monday)
Col. James (Nick) Rowe, a U. S. adviser to the Philippine army, was assassinated by communist terrorists near Manila last month. His death dramatized a historic fact: America is still present in the former colony it ruled for 46 years. But it also raised a question: Should the United States continue to bear a responsibility for that faraway Asian land? "No doubt about it. We were on the side of the angels." So insisted Joseph Burkholder Smith as he recently recalled his days during the late 1950s, when his job as a clandestine Central Intelligence Agency operative in the Philippines was to finance and guide local politicians.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1987 | United Press International
Raul Manglapus was sworn in Friday as foreign secretary, taking his oath of office from President Corazon Aquino in the presidential palace guest house. Manglapus, 69, resigned Oct. 9 from the 24-member Senate to replace Vice President Salvador Laurel who resigned his position as foreign secretary because of differences with Aquino over handling of the Communist insurgency.
NEWS
February 2, 1991
A simmering dispute between Washington and MANILA erupted again when U.S. Ambassador Nicholas Platt assailed a speech by Philippine Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus. The Manila official had called America the "constable of the world" and questioned whether "that responsibility is . . . just." In MALAYSIA, more than 2,500 demonstrators rallied to support Saddam Hussein. Another 2,500 have volunteered to fight with Iraq or carry out medical or other relief work, the opposition party said.
NEWS
December 18, 1990 | Reuters
Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus said Monday that the Philippines plans to include a clause in a future treaty on U.S. military bases barring nuclear weapons but acknowledged that Manila has no way of enforcing the ban. "At the moment the Americans know that our armed forces do not have the capability of detecting nuclear weapons," he said.
NEWS
October 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An American who once worked as a mercenary for the Contras in Nicaragua said he was hired in 1990 by Raul Manglapus, the foreign secretary of the Philippines, to kill a rebel leader who opposes President Corazon Aquino. The assassination never took place, but Jack Terrell said in an interview on ABC-TV that he decided to make the story public because he believes that it eventually would surface. Terrell said he was hired for $30,000 to organize a squad to kill Lt. Col.
OPINION
May 7, 1989 | Stanley Karnow, Stanley Karnow's new book, "In Our Image: America's Empire in the Philippines" (Random House), is companion to a three-part PBS television series beginning Monday)
Col. James (Nick) Rowe, a U. S. adviser to the Philippine army, was assassinated by communist terrorists near Manila last month. His death dramatized a historic fact: America is still present in the former colony it ruled for 46 years. But it also raised a question: Should the United States continue to bear a responsibility for that faraway Asian land? "No doubt about it. We were on the side of the angels." So insisted Joseph Burkholder Smith as he recently recalled his days during the late 1950s, when his job as a clandestine Central Intelligence Agency operative in the Philippines was to finance and guide local politicians.
NEWS
December 22, 1988
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze and his Philippine counterpart, Raul Manglapus, discussed offers to reduce Soviet troop strength in Asia and ways to improve bilateral relations during the Soviet official's 24-hour visit to Manila. Shevardnadze, who is to meet President Corazon Aquino today, described the talks as "very interesting" and "very substantive." He arrived Wednesday from Tokyo and is scheduled to leave later today for Communist North Korea.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | Reuters
Two men caught in a traffic jam exchanged shots with Philippine troops guarding South Korean opposition leader Kim Dae Jung today and one man was killed and two soldiers were wounded, the army said. Police said Kim and his hosts, including Philippines Foreign Secretary Raul Manglapus, Defense Secretary Fidel Ramos and other officials, were unharmed. The shooting occurred outside the Korean Garden Restaurant in Manila's Makati financial district where the officials were dining.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Philippine Foreign Minister Raul Manglapus said in Washington that the "gaps are not that unbridgeable" between American and Philippine positions on continued U.S. use of major military bases in his country. The U.S. lease on Clark Air Base, Subic Naval Base and four smaller facilities expires in September. Manila wants $5.4 billion in compensation over the next seven years. Washington has offered $520 million.
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