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NEWS
April 30, 1993 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Don Heckman contributes regularly to The Times.
Freddie Ravel is a local product well on his way to bigger and better things. Classically trained at Cal State Northridge, the versatile keyboardist-composer has been heard in the last few years with everyone from Tony Bennett and Sergio Mendes to L. Subramaniam and the Rippingtons. Tonight, Ravel--who just returned from a two-week gig in Tahiti--will lead his own group at La Ve Lee in Studio City. "We're going to have a lot of fun," Ravel said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014
Henri Lazarof Composer, teacher and art collector Henri Lazarof, 81, a prolific composer and teacher who may have been best known for the modern art collection he and his wife amassed, died Sunday at his home in Los Angeles. The cause was Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Janice Lazarof. The Lazarofs significantly bolstered the modern art collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2005 when they gave 130 works - including pieces by Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Henry Moore, Alberto Giacometti and others - to the institution.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 2014
Henri Lazarof Composer, teacher and art collector Henri Lazarof, 81, a prolific composer and teacher who may have been best known for the modern art collection he and his wife amassed, died Sunday at his home in Los Angeles. The cause was Alzheimer's disease, said his wife, Janice Lazarof. The Lazarofs significantly bolstered the modern art collection of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art in 2005 when they gave 130 works - including pieces by Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Henry Moore, Alberto Giacometti and others - to the institution.
OPINION
October 29, 2013 | Patt Morrison
When the sky became the limit for most political spending after the Supreme Court's Citizens United decision, the skywatchers like Ann Ravel had to readjust their telescopes. As head of California's Fair Political Practices Commission, she policed the money spent on candidates and initiatives, like a last-minute $11 million that showed up late in the game in 2012 from a shadowy Arizona nonprofit. Last week, the FPPC levied $16 million in penalties on "dark money" players - including that Arizona group - that circumvented state reporting rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | MARC SHULGOLD
A pessimist might have gazed in dismay around Royce Hall, UCLA, Sunday night to see the auditorium half-empty for a "special" benefit concert by (and for) the American Youth Symphony. Audiences that normally flock to hear Mehli Mehta and his young players for free evidently abandoned the orchestra when a call for support was issued. Distressing. An optimist, on the other hand, would have seen Royce as half-full on Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1987 | DANIEL CARIAGA
After an impressive debut appearance here a year ago this month, the young Canadian pianist Louis Lortie returned to Ambassador Auditorium, Pasadena, on Thursday night and impressed all over again. This time, the 28-year old virtuoso offered a Dionysian/Apollonian mix of a program, the first half devoted to Chopin, the second to Ravel. Lortie brought to both parts a sense of musical order, stylistic conviction and a high level of achieved and unflappable technique.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Hours before showtime at UCLA's Royce Hall, Teri Meredyth leaned into a new Steinway & Sons concert grand piano. Behind her, stagehands hammered together a stage extension. In front, workers shoved into place wooden panels for a backdrop. Stage left, an electrician shouted to a colleague aiming spotlights. Meredyth, the hall's longtime piano technician, pounded the keys of the 9-foot-long grand, listening for off-kilter harmonics. She tweaked tuning pins and pricked felt hammers with a needle to soften them and thus warm the tone that would be produced when they hit the strings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1997 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At almost the exact time the Royal Ballet was dancing Ravel's "Daphnis and Chloe," as choreographed by Frederick Ashton, Friday in Costa Mesa, Esa-Pekka Salonen was conducting the complete ballet as a concert work in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. The differences were illuminating.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 1991 | RICHARD S. GINELL
Katia and Marielle Labeque continue to get a lot of mileage out of their unique fire-and-ice stage act, with Katia always the possessed, electrified demon and Marielle always placidly going about her work. And musically, they continue to whip up excitement, sometimes recklessly so. In their Friday night appearance at Royce Hall, the duo-piano team came armed with a program called "Ravel and Spain," which established a Latin kinship of sorts with UCLA's current Mexican Chamber Music series.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 1994 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Though he played here just three years ago as soloist in a concerto, pianist Pascal Roge's last local solo recital took place in 1976 in Royce Hall at UCLA. At that time, one speculated on just what kind of pianist the then-24-year-old French musician would eventually become. The future has arrived, and Roge's second Southland recital, Wednesday night at Ambassador Auditorium, answered our questions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2013 | By Chris Megerian and Evan Halper
SACRAMENTO - Ann Ravel will start her new job in Washington on Monday with the kind of celebrity status rare for a career government lawyer. As California's top political watchdog, she launched a landmark investigation into secretive nonprofit groups that spent millions on state campaigns last year, and she announced $16 million in penalties against those groups this week. Ravel's supporters, who view anonymous political donations as a growing scourge on the American election system, want her to be as aggressive in her new post as a member of the Federal Election Commission, where she was sworn in on Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
Ann Ravel, California's top campaign finance watchdog, is heading to the Federal Election Commission after being confirmed by the U.S. Senate on Monday. Ravel, a Democrat, was approved alongside Republican Lee Goodman. The Federal Election Commission has been plagued by political gridlock, and the two nominees mark the first new commissioners on the panel since Obama first took office more than four years ago. Ravel is expected to serve at least one more month as chairwoman of California's Fair Political Practices Commission, according to Evan Westrup, a spokesman for Gov. Jerry Brown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2012 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Hours before showtime at UCLA's Royce Hall, Teri Meredyth leaned into a new Steinway & Sons concert grand piano. Behind her, stagehands hammered together a stage extension. In front, workers shoved into place wooden panels for a backdrop. Stage left, an electrician shouted to a colleague aiming spotlights. Meredyth, the hall's longtime piano technician, pounded the keys of the 9-foot-long grand, listening for off-kilter harmonics. She tweaked tuning pins and pricked felt hammers with a needle to soften them and thus warm the tone that would be produced when they hit the strings.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell
Following up last week's pairing of Beethoven and De Falla, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos offered another program at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Saturday night with a similar formula: Haydn with Spanish and quasi-Spanish music.  And he had company in the form of cellist Lynn Harrell, who was in a mischievous mood.  After an innocuous launch into the first movement cadenza of Haydn's Cello Concerto in C, Harrell started inserting funny pauses that...
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
An orchestra of many moving parts, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra does not have a home. Besides its main orchestral series, it has a Westside chamber series, a Baroque series downtown and five fall exclusive foodie fundraisers in classy homes around town. But that orchestral series, given on Saturday nights at the Alex Theatre in Glendale and Sunday nights in Royce Hall at UCLA, is LACO's real bread and butter. This season's opener, which I heard at Royce, was a showcase program, itself made up of many moving parts, within which there were more moving parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Kevin Berger
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - Inside his airy loft last week, Andrew Norman was nervous as he talked about his childhood and God. The 32-year-old composer, a finalist this year for the Pulitzer Prize in music, spoke in anxious halts and starts about his upbringing in "a strict religious environment" in Modesto, where his father is a pastor at an evangelical church. Norman was tense because he rarely spoke about his personal life and wasn't quite sure what to say. And since he had left home as a teenager to study music at USC, he had wrestled with his faith, an inner conflict heard in his music, notably his searing, Pulitzer-nominated work for violin, viola and cello, "The Companion Guide to Rome," a portrait of nine churches and saints.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2012 | By Kevin Berger
BROOKLYN, N.Y. - Inside his airy loft last week, Andrew Norman was nervous as he talked about his childhood and God. The 32-year-old composer, a finalist this year for the Pulitzer Prize in music, spoke in anxious halts and starts about his upbringing in "a strict religious environment" in Modesto, where his father is a pastor at an evangelical church. Norman was tense because he rarely spoke about his personal life and wasn't quite sure what to say. And since he had left home as a teenager to study music at USC, he had wrestled with his faith, an inner conflict heard in his music, notably his searing, Pulitzer-nominated work for violin, viola and cello, "The Companion Guide to Rome," a portrait of nine churches and saints.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1993
The Japan America Symphony Orchestra of Los Angeles, led by its music director, Heiichiro Ohyama, will present four concerts during its new season. The first three will be at the Japan America Theatre in Little Tokyo. The orchestral season begins Oct. 3, with a program of music by Ifukube, Prokofiev and Beethoven at which Masuko Ushioda will be soloist in the Second Violin Concerto by Prokofiev.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Rebecca Schmid, Special to the Los Angeles Times
BERLIN - Magdalena Kozena, one of today's most versatile mezzo-sopranos, has never chosen a predictable path. With her flair for Baroque music, flexible voice and striking looks, she won comparisons to the Italian diva Ceclia Bartoli shortly after she signed with the Deutsche Grammophon label in 1999, yet she quickly proved herself an equally coveted interpreter of Romantic music, championing Czech composers such as Janacek and Martinu along...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Alarmed that political groups are secretly funding bloggers to promote or attack candidates, the state's ethics czar proposed Thursday that Web-based pundits disclose such payments. Voters are increasingly relying on bloggers and websites for information on political issues and have a right to know if an interested party is paying to plant messages, said Ann Ravel, who heads California's political watchdog agency. "In order for people to really know whether they can have faith and trust in the independence of recommendations they are receiving, they have to be aware" of any payments, she said.
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