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BUSINESS
August 7, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move aimed at boosting itself into the top tier of computer game makers, Activision Inc. will announce today that it will buy game developer Raven Software for nearly $12 million in stock. Activision, a developer and publisher of games ranging from Zork Grand Inquisitor to Earthworm Jim, is seeking to expand its lineup of games for CD-ROMs and the Sony, Sega and Nintendo platforms.
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BUSINESS
August 24, 2000 | GARY GENTILE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Making a computer game may once have been the exclusive domain of techno-geeks working alone. But today's games, especially those based on television shows or films, can require as much star power and behind-the-scenes expertise as any Hollywood epic. The upcoming "Star Trek: Voyager--Elite Force," for instance, required a casting director, voice-over director and most of the cast of the Paramount TV series, from Captain Janeway to Officer Tuvok.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1995 | David Colker, David Colker is a Times staff writer
If you were one of the many people transformed into an anti-social insomniac by Doom, the addictive shoot-'em-up computer game that swept the country last year, there is bad news. Heretic. It's the new game co-authored by the same team as Doom, and if anything, this one is even more addictive. Unlike Doom, which takes place in outer space in the future, Heretic is set in a Medieval milieu of rustic castles, quaint villages, vast fields, waterfalls and frozen lakes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1995 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The walls of Annex A at the Las Vegas Convention Center were reverberating with the electronic sounds of software publishers from around the world intensely competing for attention from the nearly 100,000 attendees of the biannual Consumer Electronics Show. Not even as benign an icon as Mickey Mouse was exempt from the booming hype. The virtues of an upcoming video game, Mickey Mania, declared in huge letters and the ominous tones of an announcer: "NO GOOFY! NO MINNIE! NO MERCY!"
BUSINESS
April 28, 2001 | ALEX PHAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lost in the carnage of the technology-stock slaughter has been one of the best-performing sectors of the stock market: video games. Shares of the top 10 independent U.S. game publishers have surged 69% during the last year, with two Southland companies--Activision Inc. and THQ Inc.--leading the charge. The Nasdaq composite index, by comparison, executed a 46% belly-flop in the same period. Behind the impressive numbers, however, is a story of an industry in the throes of frantic consolidation.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2010 | By Alex Pham and Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
Mark Lamia, as the head of Treyarch Studio, is used to late nights overseeing the creation of what's likely to be the biggest video game of the holidays, Call of Duty: Black Ops. But on a Monday in late October, Lamia stuck around even later than normal ? until 1:30 a.m. ? waiting to talk to a game journalist. "I had just finished playing Black Ops at Treyarch, and when I walked out of the room, there he was standing there to ask me what I thought," said Geoff Keighley, who hosts "GameTrailers TV" on MTV Networks' Spike.
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