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Ravenswood Apartments

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MAGAZINE
October 26, 2003 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
The jazzy red neon sign on the roof of the Ravenswood apartments in Hancock Park has been a semaphore of swellegance since 1928. In August, the city moved closer to making the building an official landmark when the Cultural Heritage Commission recommended the Ravenswood as a Historic Cultural Monument. The seven-story Art Deco hothouse at 570 N. Rossmore has kept its aura from Hollywood's golden era, when Paramount Studios was rumored to have leased apartments there.
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MAGAZINE
October 26, 2003 | MICHAEL T. JARVIS
The jazzy red neon sign on the roof of the Ravenswood apartments in Hancock Park has been a semaphore of swellegance since 1928. In August, the city moved closer to making the building an official landmark when the Cultural Heritage Commission recommended the Ravenswood as a Historic Cultural Monument. The seven-story Art Deco hothouse at 570 N. Rossmore has kept its aura from Hollywood's golden era, when Paramount Studios was rumored to have leased apartments there.
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NEWS
September 19, 1991 | JACK SMITH
As I said the other day, I am hard to buy a birthday present for. So I should not have been surprised when our older son and his wife bought my wife and me a joint birthday present of a guided tour of places in which Hollywood stars have died. (Our birthdays are less than a month apart.) The Grave Line Tour was to leave at noon from Orchid and Hollywood Boulevard, just east of the Chinese Theater. Our vehicle awaited. It was a gray 1968 Cadillac hearse fitted with eight seats.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2006 | Martin Rubin, Special to The Times
THE trouble with writing a biography of someone like Mae West is that her image is not only larger than life, it's also big enough to dwarf the portrait you are trying to create. For most of her life, unto the very brink of the grave, she was engaged in imprinting that image of the sexiest of sexy women. Every action, every word, every gesture, off screen and on, seemed to be devoted to making indelible that persona.
MAGAZINE
August 8, 2004 | MARK EDWARD HARRIS
It was only a matter of time before we outgrew the map to the stars' homes. Just as the discerning cinephile has moved beyond the MGM classics, say, to B-grade horror flicks, so it goes with celebrity residences: At some point, Pickfair is just too obvious. With the book "Movie Star Homes: The Famous to the Forgotten" (Santa Monica Press), co-authors Judy Artunian and Mike Oldham have taken the "Ramon Novarro slept here" inquiry to the next level.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
James Lapine and Claudia Shear are sitting in a corner of a swank Beverly Hills hotel bar, putatively to be interviewed about how they put together "Dirty Blonde," one of the most glowingly reviewed and widely produced American plays of recent years. The show is finally getting its L.A. area premiere at the Pasadena Playhouse, starting tonight. Shear wrote it, and she's here to perform the dual roles she has played off and on over the last four years.
REAL ESTATE
April 30, 2006 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
1880s Isaac Newton Van Nuys, entrepreneur and member of the homesteading Lankershim group, has built the San Fernando Valley's first wood-frame house, its curb appeal immediately driving up prices in an area of adobe structures. Van Nuys' house, which is eye-catching for not being adobe, is on a sizable lot: a 60,000-acre swath of farmland purchased for $115,000 by a consortium including wheat-farming visionary Isaac Lankershim.
BOOKS
July 13, 1997 | WAYNE KOESTENBAUM, Wayne Koestenbaum is the author of "Jackie Under My Skin," "Rapsodies of a Repeat Offender: Poems" and "The Queen's Throat: Opera, Homosexuality & the Mystery of Desire."
Mae West's earliest memory, we learn from Emily Wortis Leider's eloquent, scrupulous, intelligent account of the star's life and times, was of "her mother massaging her with baby oil." We also learn that in her vaudeville days, West "adopted her lifelong habit of giving herself a daily enema in response to theater bathrooms that were 'so filthy I couldn't face them.' " Oil, enema: such details set a fan's pulse racing.
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