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Ravi Batra

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NEWS
August 27, 1987 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
"The Great Depression of 1990." In bold, black letters the scary words leap off the white cover of this new best seller. The book's chilling prediction of economic catastrophe is suddenly a fashionable topic among economists and a fast-growing number of lay readers alike. Author Ravi Batra, a professor at Southern Methodist University, basks in overnight celebrity. A wave of publicity in newspapers and magazines keeps the royalties rolling in.
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NEWS
August 27, 1987 | JONATHAN PETERSON, Times Staff Writer
"The Great Depression of 1990." In bold, black letters the scary words leap off the white cover of this new best seller. The book's chilling prediction of economic catastrophe is suddenly a fashionable topic among economists and a fast-growing number of lay readers alike. Author Ravi Batra, a professor at Southern Methodist University, basks in overnight celebrity. A wave of publicity in newspapers and magazines keeps the royalties rolling in.
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BOOKS
August 16, 1987 | Paul Erdman, Erdman is an economist and novelist. His most recent novel is "The Panic of '89" (Doubleday).
In 1985, Venus Books of Dallas, Tex., brought out this book written by a professor of economics at Southern Methodist University, Dr. Ravi Batra. I heard about it in a roundabout way. Barton Biggs reviewed it in the investment newsletter of Morgan Stanley, the New York investment bank. The dean of the School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University sent a copy of the review to me, with the note that Batra's book was becoming some sort of an underground read among the East Coast elite.
BOOKS
August 16, 1987 | Paul Erdman, Erdman is an economist and novelist. His most recent novel is "The Panic of '89" (Doubleday).
In 1985, Venus Books of Dallas, Tex., brought out this book written by a professor of economics at Southern Methodist University, Dr. Ravi Batra. I heard about it in a roundabout way. Barton Biggs reviewed it in the investment newsletter of Morgan Stanley, the New York investment bank. The dean of the School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University sent a copy of the review to me, with the note that Batra's book was becoming some sort of an underground read among the East Coast elite.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1988
In "Who Are The Most Overpaid People in America?," Ravi Batra, an economist and author, stated, "If there is a depression in the near future," as he predicts in his book, "the blame will have to fall on the greed and conceit of the rich people in America." According to my dictionary, "conceit" is "an excessively high opinion of oneself" and "greed" is "an excessive desire for wealth." Does Batra actually believe that the economy would benefit if Lee A. Iacocca, Donald Trump and Dave Winfield had low opinions of themselves and an excessive desire for poverty?
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | From Reuters
The author of a best-selling book forecasting a global depression in 1990 said that Monday's huge sell-off on Wall Street is no reason to panic. "I think (investors) should stay in the market. Don't panic. The time to panic is two years from now," Southern Methodist University professor Ravi Batra said from Pittsburgh.
BOOKS
June 5, 1988
POSTCARDS FROM THE EDGE by Carrie Fisher (Pocket Books: $4.50). Biting wit of a young, drugged-out, sex-saturated, neurotic--somewhat disenchanted-- Hollywood starlet. FATAL COMMAND by Joseph D. McNamara (Fawcett/Gold Medal: $3.95). Second novel from this moonlighting chief of police about a returning cop (Fraleigh) who is now involved in uncovering an industrial espionage crime. THE DESERT ROSE by Larry McMurtry (Pocket Books: $4.50).
BUSINESS
March 29, 1993 | JAMES BATES
Even if, as many expect, Clint Eastwood cleans up for "Unforgiven" at tonight's Oscar ceremony, odds are it won't revive the Clint souvenir business that once flourished in Carmel. One who should know is Paul Laub, who operated the "Clintville" souvenir shop in one of his stores when Eastwood reigned as mayor in the late 1980s. Laub sold such items as sweat shirts featuring Eastwood's "Dirty Harry" likeness that ordered people to curb their dogs.
OPINION
December 31, 1989 | Charles R. Morris, Charles R. Morris' new book, "The Coming Global Boom," will be published by Bantam in the spring. and
Broken clocks are right twice a day. Most economists have confidently predicted recessions every year since at least 1984. As we enter 1990, the long-awaited slowdown may be upon us, although some recent data releases, including durable goods production and revisions in trade and gross national product data, are suspiciously strong.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1999 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the 1980s was the "decade of greed" in business, what should we call the 1990s? Bill Gates' net worth touched $100 billion. Walt Disney Chairman Michael Eisner made $569.8 million in one day. About the only saving grace was that Planet Hollywood filed for protection from creditors in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. The decade was a hodgepodge of less-than-worthy events in business, the one constant being that it both started and ended with Donald Trump getting a lot of unwarranted publicity.
BUSINESS
February 26, 1991 | CHIP BROWN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Unlike most economists, Ravi Batra says he's always hoped his forecasts would prove wrong. But then again, Batra isn't your conventional economist. The India-born economics professor at Southern Methodist University has been warning of economic doom and gloom through books and lectures for more than a decade. And so far, a few of his predictions have been close to the mark. In his 1987 book, "The Great Depression of 1990," a New York Times No.
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