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Ravi Shankar

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2012 | Don Heckman
Ravi Shankar was already revered as a master of the sitar in 1966 when he met George Harrison, the Beatle who became his most famous disciple and gave the Indian musician-composer unexpected pop-culture cachet. Suddenly the classically trained Shankar was a darling of the hippie movement, gaining widespread attention through memorable performances at the Monterey Pop Festival, Woodstock and the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh. Harrison called him "the godfather of world music," and the great violinist Yehudi Menuhin once compared the sitarist's genius to Mozart's.
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OPINION
December 14, 2012
Re "Venice's new bloom," Column One, Dec. 11 When I moved to Venice almost 20 years ago, I still heard the occasional gunshot at night. My reaction was, "Yes, I am in Venice!" The edge of danger was part of Venice's charm. I'm in my late 50s, and when I walk down Abbot Kinney now, I feel 300 years old. Silicon Beach has moved in and has transformed Venice into yet another hipster haven. The pretty little cottages are being torn down for lot-line-to-lot-line homes, designed like fortresses with high walls and hedges that destroy the friendly community that characterized our streets.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012
MUSIC The king of the sitar, Ravi Shankar, will perform in Long Beach, bringing with him the signature Indian sound that intrigued both George Harrison and the Beatles as well as a generation of music fans. Long Beach Convention Center, Terrace Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. 7:30 p.m. Sun. $35 to $70. (800) 745-3000. http://www.longbeachcc.com.
OPINION
December 14, 2012
Re "He introduced Indian music to much of the Western world," Obituary, Dec. 12 I had the great fortune to see Ravi Shankar several times over the last 30 years. Unquestionably the most impressive of any musical performance I have ever seen was his benefit concert in Long Beach on Nov. 4. Despite requiring oxygen and assistance getting to and from the stage, he was in fine form throughout the show, demonstrating his characteristic sense of humor, masterful musicianship and love for the audience, fellow musicians and family.
OPINION
December 14, 2012
Re "He introduced Indian music to much of the Western world," Obituary, Dec. 12 I had the great fortune to see Ravi Shankar several times over the last 30 years. Unquestionably the most impressive of any musical performance I have ever seen was his benefit concert in Long Beach on Nov. 4. Despite requiring oxygen and assistance getting to and from the stage, he was in fine form throughout the show, demonstrating his characteristic sense of humor, masterful musicianship and love for the audience, fellow musicians and family.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1994
On May 22, one of the world's most acclaimed classical musicians presented two full-length concerts on a single day to sold-out audiences of more than 4,000 appreciative Angelenos. Each program was composed of different works from the classical repertoire, featured more than two hours of nonstop virtuoso solo and ensemble playing and offered sublime cadenzas that took the full measure of a master's half-century musical career. Perhaps in the best of all possible multicultural worlds, the fact that the musical traditions of the performers were not European, but Indian, and the fact that the renowned soloist was not Yehudi Menuhin or Alfred Brendel, but Ravi Shankar, would not have made a difference in quality of the event's coverage by the local paper of record ("Shankar Brings East to West in Pasadena," May 24)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ravi Shankar, 91, India's most famous classical musician in the West since his collaborations with Beatle George Harrison and violinist Yehudi Menuhin in the 1960s, makes an infrequent concert appearance when he performs at the Terrace Theater in Long Beach on March 25. Tell me about your upcoming concert. What do you have planned? I do my usual performance, the Indian classical music, playing on my sitar. And I have the usual accompaniment of drums and a drone instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Mark Swed
On Sept. 28, 2011, Ravi Shankar was 91 and frail when he took the stage for an unforgettable night in Los Angeles. With Shankar's death at 92 on Tuesday, we share the review of that performance from Times music critic Mark Swed. I come to praise a legend. Ravi Shankar appeared at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Thursday night. Legendary and iconic are terms cheapened and debased by advertising and the overeager. They should be reserved for someone like Shankar. I am among the maybe millions whose first meaningful experience with music from a distant culture was Shankar's sitar playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
When inspired - which, when he began to play a raga, was often - Ravi Shankar could make you think he had mastered the secret of creation. The famed Indian musician, who died Tuesday at age 92, was not a doer but a maker. His sitar seemed no ordinary musical instrument causing the air to vibrate but a musical 3-D printer producing notes that were more like elementary particles, with mass and electric charge and all those funny properties physicists call up , down , strange , charm , bottom and top . But Shankar's particles also had the one scientists don't talk about: soul . In classical Indian music, a raga begins with the choice of a scale.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Irene Lacher
Ravi Shankar, 91, India's most famous classical musician in the West since his collaborations with Beatle George Harrison and violinist Yehudi Menuhin in the 1960s, makes an infrequent concert appearance when he performs at the Terrace Theater in Long Beach on March 25. Tell me about your upcoming concert. What do you have planned? I do my usual performance, the Indian classical music, playing on my sitar. And I have the usual accompaniment of drums and a drone instrument.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
When inspired - which, when he began to play a raga, was often - Ravi Shankar could make you think he had mastered the secret of creation. The famed Indian musician, who died Tuesday at age 92, was not a doer but a maker. His sitar seemed no ordinary musical instrument causing the air to vibrate but a musical 3-D printer producing notes that were more like elementary particles, with mass and electric charge and all those funny properties physicists call up , down , strange , charm , bottom and top . But Shankar's particles also had the one scientists don't talk about: soul . In classical Indian music, a raga begins with the choice of a scale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2012 | Don Heckman
Ravi Shankar was already revered as a master of the sitar in 1966 when he met George Harrison, the Beatle who became his most famous disciple and gave the Indian musician-composer unexpected pop-culture cachet. Suddenly the classically trained Shankar was a darling of the hippie movement, gaining widespread attention through memorable performances at the Monterey Pop Festival, Woodstock and the 1971 Concert for Bangladesh. Harrison called him "the godfather of world music," and the great violinist Yehudi Menuhin once compared the sitarist's genius to Mozart's.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Mark Swed
On Sept. 28, 2011, Ravi Shankar was 91 and frail when he took the stage for an unforgettable night in Los Angeles. With Shankar's death at 92 on Tuesday, we share the review of that performance from Times music critic Mark Swed. I come to praise a legend. Ravi Shankar appeared at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Thursday night. Legendary and iconic are terms cheapened and debased by advertising and the overeager. They should be reserved for someone like Shankar. I am among the maybe millions whose first meaningful experience with music from a distant culture was Shankar's sitar playing.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
Among the items the Grammy Museum included in its George Harrison “Living in the Material World” exhibit that opened about this time last year was a letter the ex-Beatle received following the all-star Concert for Bangladesh fundraiser he spearheaded at Madison Square Garden in 1971. The letter was from his friend Ravi Shankar, the Indian sitar master who had sought Harrison's help in raising public awareness of the plight of residents of the small nation that had recently been devastated by floods and war. Shankar, who died Tuesday at age 92 , thanked Harrison in his letter for his efforts in rounding up some of the biggest names in rock music at the time -- including Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, Leon Russell and Billy Preston -- to bring their celebrity to bear on behalf of people struggling half a world away.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012
MUSIC The king of the sitar, Ravi Shankar, will perform in Long Beach, bringing with him the signature Indian sound that intrigued both George Harrison and the Beatles as well as a generation of music fans. Long Beach Convention Center, Terrace Theater, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. 7:30 p.m. Sun. $35 to $70. (800) 745-3000. http://www.longbeachcc.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2012 | By Drew Tewksbury, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For legendary Indian sitarist Ravi Shankar's 75th birthday, a very special guest was invited onstage to perform with the onetime Beatles cohort. Shankar's accompanying orchestra members set down their instruments as she walked onto the New Dehli stage, sat down with her own sitar and performed a 15-minute solo set. In front of 2,500 people, Anoushka Shankar, Ravi's daughter, had made her musical debut. She was 13. "It was utterly terrifying," Shankar says of her big premiere in 1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
Among the items the Grammy Museum included in its George Harrison “Living in the Material World” exhibit that opened about this time last year was a letter the ex-Beatle received following the all-star Concert for Bangladesh fundraiser he spearheaded at Madison Square Garden in 1971. The letter was from his friend Ravi Shankar, the Indian sitar master who had sought Harrison's help in raising public awareness of the plight of residents of the small nation that had recently been devastated by floods and war. Shankar, who died Tuesday at age 92 , thanked Harrison in his letter for his efforts in rounding up some of the biggest names in rock music at the time -- including Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, Ringo Starr, Leon Russell and Billy Preston -- to bring their celebrity to bear on behalf of people struggling half a world away.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2012 | By Irene Lacher, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ravi Shankar, 91, India's most famous classical musician in the West since his collaborations with Beatle George Harrison and violinist Yehudi Menuhin in the 1960s, makes an infrequent concert appearance when he performs at the Terrace Theater in Long Beach on March 25. Tell me about your upcoming concert. What do you have planned? I do my usual performance, the Indian classical music, playing on my sitar. And I have the usual accompaniment of drums and a drone instrument.
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