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OPINION
February 9, 2003 | William M. Arkin, William M. Arkin is a military affairs analyst who writes regularly for Opinion. E-mail: warkin@igc.org.
Three weeks ago, I arrived home to a message on my answering machine from an official in the Bush administration. Shortly after the Gulf War in 1991, I had photographed an elaborately camouflaged building in Iraq. Now the White House wanted permission to use it in a publication it was putting out on Saddam Hussein's regime called "Apparatus of Lies." On Wednesday, as I watched Secretary of State Colin L.
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AUTOS
March 13, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
As many as 303 deaths could have been caused by a defect that recently prompted General Motors to recall 1.6 million cars, according to a new report commissioned by an independent consumer watchdog group. GM has acknowledged only 12 deaths linked to faulty ignition switches that can disable the cars' safety systems. In a letter to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Center for Auto Safety on Thursday cited raw data pulled from accident reports connected to two of the six models GM has recalled.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2001
Re "Agencies Told to Prepare for 15% Cut," Oct. 12: It was not surprising to see the California Department of Corrections state that it may close part, or all, of an entire prison. By its own numbers, it is at least 5,000 prisoners below capacity, and its most recent prisoner population projections forecast 18,000 fewer prisoners than its projections issued only six months earlier. What is surprising--and alarming--is that despite the raw data, officials appear unable to part with the planned 5,200-bed prison slated for Delano.
SCIENCE
November 29, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The journal Food and Chemical Toxicology is retracting a highly controversial French study it published last year linking genetically modified maize to cancerous tumors in rats. In a statement released from its Cambridge, Mass., offices on Thursday, publisher Elsevier said that upon closer review of the paper, editors determined that the experimental sample was too small to allow for clear conclusions. Also, the type of rat involved in the experiment is known for high incidence of tumors, it said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2008 | From the Associated Press
State officials are warning 441 applicants for law enforcement officer jobs that a laptop computer containing their psychological evaluations was stolen in Mexico this month. The applicants included candidates seeking jobs as California Highway Patrol and correctional officers. State Personnel Board spokeswoman Sherry Evans said everyone seeking those jobs must undergo psychological testing. Raw data from the screenings were in a laptop that a contract psychologist took on vacation.
SCIENCE
November 29, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The journal Food and Chemical Toxicology is retracting a highly controversial French study it published last year linking genetically modified maize to cancerous tumors in rats. In a statement released from its Cambridge, Mass., offices on Thursday, publisher Elsevier said that upon closer review of the paper, editors determined that the experimental sample was too small to allow for clear conclusions. Also, the type of rat involved in the experiment is known for high incidence of tumors, it said.
AUTOS
March 13, 2014 | By David Undercoffler
As many as 303 deaths could have been caused by a defect that recently prompted General Motors to recall 1.6 million cars, according to a new report commissioned by an independent consumer watchdog group. GM has acknowledged only 12 deaths linked to faulty ignition switches that can disable the cars' safety systems. In a letter to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the Center for Auto Safety on Thursday cited raw data pulled from accident reports connected to two of the six models GM has recalled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and Ben Welsh
Los Angeles' new controller moved Wednesday to open city finances to quick and easy public scrutiny online, unveiling a website with extensive detail on how City Hall collects and spends billions of dollars. The website, Control Panel L.A. , gives users access to a huge volume of data on taxpayer expenditures for police, sanitation, street repairs and other services - information that previously would have taken weeks or months to get through formal requests for records. With user-friendly icons and drop-down menus, the site enables visitors to download, sort and analyze data on city employee salaries and more than 100,000 payments to contractors.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2013 | By David Horsey
In principle, the National Security Agency's vast data collection operation is troubling, but, in the age of Google and Facebook, it feels like having just one more Big Brother in a growing family of Big Brothers. In response to the revelation that the NSA is scooping up metadata on every call placed on Verizon, the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit against chief members of the Obama administration's national security team. The ACLU's deputy legal director, Jameel Jaffer, said, "This dragnet program is surely one of the largest surveillance efforts ever launched by a democratic government against its own citizens.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jon Healey
California Secretary of State Debra Bowen is resisting a push by activists and journalists for better disclosure of campaign finance data, arguing in essence that it would cost too much to comply. It's a surprising stance from Bowen, whose office has fought to make more information about donors available to California voters. It also strains credulity. At issue is a request by MapLight California, California Common Cause and 10 others, including this newspaper, for a downloadable version of the campaign finance data that the secretary of state collects.
OPINION
October 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's not exactly Big Data. Not yet, anyway. Los Angeles City Hall has so far given us two Big Burps of public information, one in the form of a website from the mayor's office that measures the performance of city departments, and one from the controller making it easier to find out how much city workers and contractors get paid. The numbers, by themselves, don't necessarily mean much. But that's OK. Local government has been generally behind the curve in sharing with the public the massive amounts of information it has on the money it collects and spends and on the services it provides; Los Angeles is about in the middle of the pack in catching up to the private sector in compiling and making use of operational and customer data.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and Ben Welsh
Los Angeles' new controller moved Wednesday to open city finances to quick and easy public scrutiny online, unveiling a website with extensive detail on how City Hall collects and spends billions of dollars. The website, Control Panel L.A. , gives users access to a huge volume of data on taxpayer expenditures for police, sanitation, street repairs and other services - information that previously would have taken weeks or months to get through formal requests for records. With user-friendly icons and drop-down menus, the site enables visitors to download, sort and analyze data on city employee salaries and more than 100,000 payments to contractors.
WORLD
September 11, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency routinely shares raw intelligence data with Israel that probably includes sensitive information about Americans, according to the latest top-secret document leaked by former intelligence contractor Edward Snowden. The 2009 document, a memorandum of understanding between the NSA and its Israeli counterpart, says the U.S. government regularly hands over intercepted communications that have not first been reviewed by U.S. analysts and therefore may contain phone calls and emails of American citizens.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Where would science be without its brilliant amateurs? Not even close to where it is now. The likes of Gregor Mendel, Michael Faraday, Joseph Priestley -- even Benjamin Franklin -- and more put discipline to enthusiasm and taught us about natural selection, electromagnetism, chemistry and electricity. For centuries, the professional scientist -- the trained “natural philosopher” -- barely existed. Leonardo da Vinci had to paint pictures to keep the pot boiling so he could dream and imagine science and engineering far into the future.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2013 | By David Horsey
In principle, the National Security Agency's vast data collection operation is troubling, but, in the age of Google and Facebook, it feels like having just one more Big Brother in a growing family of Big Brothers. In response to the revelation that the NSA is scooping up metadata on every call placed on Verizon, the American Civil Liberties Union has filed a federal lawsuit against chief members of the Obama administration's national security team. The ACLU's deputy legal director, Jameel Jaffer, said, "This dragnet program is surely one of the largest surveillance efforts ever launched by a democratic government against its own citizens.
NEWS
April 30, 2013 | By Jon Healey
California Secretary of State Debra Bowen is resisting a push by activists and journalists for better disclosure of campaign finance data, arguing in essence that it would cost too much to comply. It's a surprising stance from Bowen, whose office has fought to make more information about donors available to California voters. It also strains credulity. At issue is a request by MapLight California, California Common Cause and 10 others, including this newspaper, for a downloadable version of the campaign finance data that the secretary of state collects.
NEWS
July 11, 2013 | By Patt Morrison
Where would science be without its brilliant amateurs? Not even close to where it is now. The likes of Gregor Mendel, Michael Faraday, Joseph Priestley -- even Benjamin Franklin -- and more put discipline to enthusiasm and taught us about natural selection, electromagnetism, chemistry and electricity. For centuries, the professional scientist -- the trained “natural philosopher” -- barely existed. Leonardo da Vinci had to paint pictures to keep the pot boiling so he could dream and imagine science and engineering far into the future.
OPINION
October 29, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
It's not exactly Big Data. Not yet, anyway. Los Angeles City Hall has so far given us two Big Burps of public information, one in the form of a website from the mayor's office that measures the performance of city departments, and one from the controller making it easier to find out how much city workers and contractors get paid. The numbers, by themselves, don't necessarily mean much. But that's OK. Local government has been generally behind the curve in sharing with the public the massive amounts of information it has on the money it collects and spends and on the services it provides; Los Angeles is about in the middle of the pack in catching up to the private sector in compiling and making use of operational and customer data.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2008 | From the Associated Press
State officials are warning 441 applicants for law enforcement officer jobs that a laptop computer containing their psychological evaluations was stolen in Mexico this month. The applicants included candidates seeking jobs as California Highway Patrol and correctional officers. State Personnel Board spokeswoman Sherry Evans said everyone seeking those jobs must undergo psychological testing. Raw data from the screenings were in a laptop that a contract psychologist took on vacation.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2005 | Christine N. Ziemba
If the eyes are the windows to the soul, then grocery lists must be the automatic doors to the American psyche. Bill Keaggy, 34, a St. Louis resident who began posting his collection of random grocery lists in 1999 (on www.grocerylists.org), says it's possible to read into a person's life and lifestyle by closely examining a list's organization, shopping items, shorthand and secret codes.
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