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FOOD
June 10, 2009 | Jessica Gelt
Diva Dompe and Amanda Brown pad barefoot around Dompe's rickety house in the sun-soaked hills of Echo Park, preparing a "cheesy" vegan sauce of cashews, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice to mix with spiraled zucchini noodles. Once the concoction is topped with chopped walnuts and put in a dehydrator for 20 minutes, the women will cheekily refer to it as "baked macaroni and cheese." It's a popular dish among fans of their raw food and vegan catering company Crops and Rawbers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 2, 2009 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, ART CRITIC
Cartoons have been art's most common language going on 50 years, ever since Roy Lichtenstein painted Mickey Mouse and Edward Ruscha conjured Little Orphan Annie. Make that 140 years if you believe (as I do) that the brushy, broken, unfinished-surface look of Impressionist paintings was derived from the oil sketches that artists of the French Academy used to map out the slick, highly finished surfaces of their often grandiose canvases. They called those preparatory sketches cartoons, and the Impressionists latched onto their raw energy.
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NEWS
August 17, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Not since Republicans no-bizzed-like-show-bizzed in Philadelphia two weeks ago has so much been made of so little. This week's Democratic National Convention has produced a conga line of media covering media covering media in a lunar scape of news so barren that Tuesday's stump speeches by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy and his niece Caroline Kennedy somehow got live coverage even on network TV, giving the GOP good reason to complain.
FOOD
June 10, 2009 | Jessica Gelt
Diva Dompe and Amanda Brown pad barefoot around Dompe's rickety house in the sun-soaked hills of Echo Park, preparing a "cheesy" vegan sauce of cashews, garlic, olive oil and lemon juice to mix with spiraled zucchini noodles. Once the concoction is topped with chopped walnuts and put in a dehydrator for 20 minutes, the women will cheekily refer to it as "baked macaroni and cheese." It's a popular dish among fans of their raw food and vegan catering company Crops and Rawbers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1987 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Luis Valdez, who wrote and directed "La Bamba" (citywide), the story of rock 'n' roller Ritchie Valens, has flooded his movie with the driving, irresistible music of Los Lobos; he has reached deep into personal memory for authentic details of migrant worker camps and cracker-box San Fernando Valley houses, and in Lou Diamond Phillips he has found an exceptional young unknown to play Valens.
NEWS
December 22, 1994 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tradition, in the musical and visual arts, holds nothing on William Roper. The Los Angeleno has made something of a name for himself in jazz and fringe music circles for his work on that lowly, rarely played instrument, the tuba. He is also known for improvisational moxie, a hell-bent and often zany approach to chasing his own private muse.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1996
Regarding John Roos' review of Bobby Caldwell (March 25): "Schmaltz, adult contemporary music, nonthreatening, pleasantly soothing"--thank God for adult music! John, if you want raw energy and someone to "risk," I suggest you go review kid stuff--adolescent angst; flannel-shirted, three-chord power strummers. I guess it's a question of taste. And there is no good taste in a Spinal Tap-like performance of loud, raucous, teenage screaming and anger. Grow up, John! BRUCE KING Brea
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986
It seems as though no matter how many devoted Billy Joel fans write in to defend the man and his music, it won't eliminate the hatred Times critics have for his work. Over the last few years, I've had the displeasure of reading nothing but snide remarks about him: his work being called "derivative"; Joel being termed a "pop chameleon" and The Times' "favorite Ray Charles impersonator"; Steve Pond claiming whenever he goes into the studio, "he always acts as if he has something to prove"; someone even went out of their way to call "Maybe He'll Know" (off Cyndi Lauper's "True Colors")
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1993 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
"Where I Live" may be prime-time's first stoopcom. Premiering at 9:30 tonight on ABC (Channels 7, 3, 10 and 42), the comedy's protagonist is Douglas St. Martin (Doug E. Doug), a Harlem 17-year-old who spends half his time jawing with friends on the front stoop of the apartment house where he lives with his parents (Sullivan Walker and Lorraine Toussaint) and 14-year-old sister (Yunoka Doyle). What the premiere lacks in snappy wit it makes up for--almost--in raw energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2001
I think Patrick Goldstein has it a little backward when he says that "staying cool is hard-wired into the DNA of MTV" ("Keeping Its Cool," Aug. 21). I was born the year MTV took off, and as I watch the 20th anniversary bash, seeing for the first time MTV blast off to the countdown of a rocket launch and then jump into the Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star," I can't help but feel regret for losing something so fresh and idealistic without having ever known it. The MTV of 1981 seemed to be something new, a rock 'n' roll odyssey with real energy and ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Swedes -- at least until General Motors took over Saab and Ford, Volvo -- made wonderful cars. We all know about their furniture finesse, however much charm IKEA has lost through ubiquity. Swedish cinema had the great Bergman. ABBA is definitely yesterday, although a new generation of idiosyncratic Swedish rock is on the rise. One thing the Swedes have been consistently making for the past quarter of a century is star conductors.
NEWS
September 29, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
SEU Jorge and Badi Assad brought two very different Brazilian music perspectives to the Knitting Factory on Tuesday night, both compelling. Singer-actor Jorge, his roots tracing back to a childhood as a homeless kid from Brazil's slums, came to prominence in the gritty movie "City of God," then as a singing sailor who brought contemporary vigor to a set of David Bowie tunes in "The Life Aquatic With Steve Zissou." Guitarist-singer Assad is a member of the talented Assad family.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2005 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
The Brian Jonestown Massacre is a special case: an underground sensation for most of its career, endlessly on the rise or breaking apart while making forward-looking music rooted deeply in the psychedelic past. Leader Anton Newcombe was all love and gratitude at the band's homecoming show Thursday at the Vanguard in Hollywood, talking endlessly of making art and revolution, and complaining of a voice thrashed during too many nights on the road.
NEWS
June 14, 2005 | JOY NICHOLSON
MAYBE the sinew-machinery of animal movement has always struck you as being more elegant than human-created metal, spokes, dials, cranks, levers and wheels. Maybe, because of that, you never were much the mountain biking type. So it must come as a surprise to find yourself commandeering a GT Avalanche 0.5, whooshing beneath hawks, brushing past tumbleweed, cruising alongside wild mustard in Baldwin Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2001
I think Patrick Goldstein has it a little backward when he says that "staying cool is hard-wired into the DNA of MTV" ("Keeping Its Cool," Aug. 21). I was born the year MTV took off, and as I watch the 20th anniversary bash, seeing for the first time MTV blast off to the countdown of a rocket launch and then jump into the Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star," I can't help but feel regret for losing something so fresh and idealistic without having ever known it. The MTV of 1981 seemed to be something new, a rock 'n' roll odyssey with real energy and ideas.
NEWS
August 17, 2000 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Not since Republicans no-bizzed-like-show-bizzed in Philadelphia two weeks ago has so much been made of so little. This week's Democratic National Convention has produced a conga line of media covering media covering media in a lunar scape of news so barren that Tuesday's stump speeches by Sen. Edward M. Kennedy and his niece Caroline Kennedy somehow got live coverage even on network TV, giving the GOP good reason to complain.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1996 | MIKE BOEHM
Nevermind the title--Psychic Rain's second CD is about as direct a piece of work as you can find. The music sticks to the traditional verities. This is straight-up, catchy, guitar-based pop-rock with a bit of jangle and a bit of complementary muscle balancing just about every track.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 6, 1985 | RANDY LEWIS, Times Staff Writer
Barry Edge, the lead singer and main songwriter for the Imitators, has heard the same complaints from religious groups about his band's driving rock music that have been raised against rock groups for 30 years. "You mean people who say that rock 'n' roll is of the devil? Oh yeah, we've had that," Edge said with a laugh. But the Imitators' songs aren't about "rocking around the clock" or "highways to hell." Instead they center on God, Jesus and the Bible.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1998 | Chris Riemenschneider
"I really like having to put my shoulder against something and push as hard as I can," Mary Cutrufello says, her mop-top of dreadlocks flowing through the air as she fakes a forcible entry against the back of a restaurant booth. The 27-year-old, husky-voiced rock singer--whose debut album, "When the Night Is Through," has just been released by Mercury Records--has already pushed open plenty of doors in Texas, despite sizable odds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1998 | SARA SCRIBNER
With a penchant for juvenile humor, self-ridicule and Green Day-style power pop, Blink-182 isn't the deepest band around. But the recipe has made the San Diego trio a big hit with the rush-craving skate- and surf-punk crowd. Fast-paced and knuckleheaded, its sold-out show at the Hollywood Palladium on Friday scored high on sheer, hyperkinetic energy alone.
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