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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1999 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, TIMES RESTAURANT CRITIC
Just about everybody in L.A. has their favorite pod-mall sushi bar, the more obscure the better. But if you happen to live in "exclusive Beverly Hills," as the neighborhood is called in the Monica reports, where do you go? There's Ginza Sushiko, the most expensive restaurant of any ilk in all of L.A., but even deep-pocketed Beverly Hills sorts may balk at spending more than $200 a person for raw fish, however exquisite, on a regular basis.
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NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Forget the war on Christmas; now the nanny statists have taken aim at another storied holiday tradition (at least if you live in Wisconsin): cannibalism. OK, wait, that's not quite accurate (though it is a heck of lede). It's actually the “cannibal sandwich” that has caught the all-seeing eye of Big Government - and it doesn't like what it's seeing. First, some background, for those folks who live in normal places and eat normal food - or those who are having visions of the wood-chipper scene in “Fargo” (which wasn't even set in Wisconsin, by the way, for you geographically challenged Californians)
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HEALTH
October 22, 2007 | Washington Post
Attention, sushi lovers: Be sure to tell your doctor what you've been eating if you develop sudden stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. That's the advice of the American College of Gastroenterology, which points to two reports from Japan that illustrate why. Raw and undercooked fish can contain larvae of a roundworm, called Anisakis. The larvae don't survive long in humans.
FOOD
October 13, 2011 | By Linda Burum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Truffles shaved onto wild-caught yellowtail sashimi or kanpachi nigiri splashed with black caviar might begin your omakase at Got Sushi? Or the chef might enrobe supple ribbons of pristine snapper in creamy cured uni brightened with the sharp citrus snap of yuzu and house-made soy sauce. Close your eyes and for a moment it's easy to forget that this tiny sushi bar is squeezed into a corner of King's Burgers, a fully operational burger joint in Northridge. With its vintage beige leatherette tuck 'n' roll booths and faux wood grain Formica tabletops, the classic setting is visually perfect for a place known for enormous breakfast burritos and fully loaded pastrami burgers.
TRAVEL
January 19, 1986 | DR. KARL NEUMANN, Neumann is a Forest Hills, N.Y., pediatrician who writes on travel-related matters
Japan, the land of Mt. Fuji, hot baths, raw fish, bullet trains and Kabuki dancers, is also the land of cleanliness, health and safety. In Japan, there are no unusual communicable diseases or tropical illnesses. Tap water and milk are safe to drink. Sanitation is generally on a par with North America and Northern Europe. People with colds wear face masks in the street to prevent the spread of their germs, and blowing one's nose in public is considered impolite.
FOOD
August 22, 2007 | Amy Scattergood, Times Staff Writer
SEVEN years ago, when chefs Mario Batali and David Pasternack opened their New York restaurant Esca, they introduced Manhattan to what they called "crudo" -- Italian-style sliced raw fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2007 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
IN the United States, sushi seems quintessentially foreign -- and utterly familiar. But few Japanese would recognize the enormous rolls stuffed with mayonnaise, cream cheese, chili peppers and cilantro that Americans eat as sushi. In Japan, sushi means raw fish served in individual portions with vinegared rice and, sometimes, dried seaweed. By Japanese standards, many Americans also eat it incorrectly: Sushi should be picked up with the fingers (not chopsticks) and eaten in one bite.
NEWS
April 27, 1989
Doctors removing a young man's appendix were surprised when they found the real cause of his pain--a 2-inch-long red worm he had eaten with his homemade sushi. Although worms have been a long-recognized hazard of eating raw fish, experts say most cases of worm infection occur when people prepare it at home. At restaurants, sushi chefs work to keep worms from reaching customers. In the latest case, described in today's New England Journal of Medicine, doctors identified the culprit as a larval nematode known as eustrongylides.
FOOD
October 19, 1995
I want to correct your item on spam musubi ("Cookstuff," Sept. 14). Musubi and sushi are two entirely different things. To the uninitiated, they may resemble each other, but the primary difference is that sushi always has vinegared rice, whereas musubi (aka " nigiri ") never does; the rice is plain. There are no musubi bars as there are sushi bars. One doesn't drink sake with musubi as one would with sushi. Musubi are not topped with expensive raw fish.
FOOD
April 15, 1993
I read your Passover edition (April 4) with interest and would like to call your attention to Rachel Greene's "Gefilte Fish Was a Very Big Deal." Your readers might want to know that gefilte fish meant "filled fish." Knowledgeable cooks took the trouble to "fill" the skin of the prepared chopped fish, which they then immersed in the bubbling broth of fish heads, etc. Then a new generation (is it possible that Greene's grandma was of the "new" generation?) decided to eliminate the time-consuming effort of filling the skins and just made ovals of the chopped fish which they then immersed in the broth.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Tony Pierce, Los Angeles Times
NOTE: This is a blog about two guys attempting to lose weight over a six-week period.  They kicked off their weight-loss "strategies" on Jan. 10 . The lady who owns the place where I got the cookies for the Cookie Diet called to tell me I was doing it wrong. "If you really feel hungry," she said, "have another cookie. " I was not doing it that way. I was trying my best to muster through the irritation and ignoring the pangs until it was time for the next cookie.
NEWS
January 17, 2011 | By Jimmy Orr, Los Angeles Times
NOTE:  This is a blog about two guys attempting to lose weight over a six-week period.  They kicked off their weight loss "strategies" on Monday. Friday was rough.  The morning oatmeal lasted until about 11 a.m., but then the cravings hit for something sweet.  Popped into my boss’ office and grabbed some gum. Unfortunately, the gum on his desk was a gag gift.  I didn’t read the package.  The gum was bacon-flavored. That horrific taste didn’t leave my mouth for the rest of the day.  It was almost as bad as the time I ate raw whale tongue soaked in its own blood.
FOOD
November 5, 2008 | S. IRENE VIRBILA, RESTAURANT CRITIC
In the current economic climate, all of us are feeling the pain and we're looking, hard-eyed, at the way we spend our money. Those $100 sushi meals at Mori Sushi or the breathtaking blowout at Urasawa may have to wait until the market gets its act together. But once you've acquired the taste for high-grade sushi, it's hard to go back to eating the mediocre stuff served up at countless sushi bars across the city.
HEALTH
October 22, 2007 | Washington Post
Attention, sushi lovers: Be sure to tell your doctor what you've been eating if you develop sudden stomach cramps, diarrhea and vomiting. That's the advice of the American College of Gastroenterology, which points to two reports from Japan that illustrate why. Raw and undercooked fish can contain larvae of a roundworm, called Anisakis. The larvae don't survive long in humans.
FOOD
August 22, 2007 | Amy Scattergood, Times Staff Writer
SEVEN years ago, when chefs Mario Batali and David Pasternack opened their New York restaurant Esca, they introduced Manhattan to what they called "crudo" -- Italian-style sliced raw fish.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2007 | Charles Solomon, Special to The Times
IN the United States, sushi seems quintessentially foreign -- and utterly familiar. But few Japanese would recognize the enormous rolls stuffed with mayonnaise, cream cheese, chili peppers and cilantro that Americans eat as sushi. In Japan, sushi means raw fish served in individual portions with vinegared rice and, sometimes, dried seaweed. By Japanese standards, many Americans also eat it incorrectly: Sushi should be picked up with the fingers (not chopsticks) and eaten in one bite.
NEWS
December 6, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Forget the war on Christmas; now the nanny statists have taken aim at another storied holiday tradition (at least if you live in Wisconsin): cannibalism. OK, wait, that's not quite accurate (though it is a heck of lede). It's actually the “cannibal sandwich” that has caught the all-seeing eye of Big Government - and it doesn't like what it's seeing. First, some background, for those folks who live in normal places and eat normal food - or those who are having visions of the wood-chipper scene in “Fargo” (which wasn't even set in Wisconsin, by the way, for you geographically challenged Californians)
FOOD
October 13, 2011 | By Linda Burum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Truffles shaved onto wild-caught yellowtail sashimi or kanpachi nigiri splashed with black caviar might begin your omakase at Got Sushi? Or the chef might enrobe supple ribbons of pristine snapper in creamy cured uni brightened with the sharp citrus snap of yuzu and house-made soy sauce. Close your eyes and for a moment it's easy to forget that this tiny sushi bar is squeezed into a corner of King's Burgers, a fully operational burger joint in Northridge. With its vintage beige leatherette tuck 'n' roll booths and faux wood grain Formica tabletops, the classic setting is visually perfect for a place known for enormous breakfast burritos and fully loaded pastrami burgers.
FOOD
April 14, 2004 | Linda Burum, Special to The Times
In the vast fish markets of Korea's teeming ports and strung along the beach areas of its long coasts, there are countless raw fish houses (hwe jip), charcoal grill carts and impromptu stands specializing in boiled cockles, spicy crab soup or whatever the season brings ashore. Odaesan, a palatial new restaurant, brings the same bounty to Koreatown but in a far more luxurious setting than a hwe jip.
FOOD
September 19, 2001 | Barbara Hansen
Kimchi kimbap is a uniquely Korean style of sushi. " Kim" means seaweed, "pap" means rice and kimchi is a spicy pickle often made with nappa cabbage. So it's easy to figure that kimchi kimbap is seaweed-wrapped sushi with cabbage kimchi in the center. Other components are cucumber, carrot, egg pancake and sesame leaf, which has an enchanting, almost jasmine-like fragrance. J.Y.
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