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NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
You don't have to be an adherent of raw food (nothing heated to more than 115 degrees) to appreciate some dishes in the raw. A story about the new raw food restaurant M.A.K.E. and its culinary academy uncovers a cuisine that's coming in from the fringe. (Who doesn't love zucchini "noodle" lasagna, anyway?) "I think now a lot of people who are not strict about raw food are incorporating it into their diets," says M.A.K.E. owner Matthew Kenney.  Much of the cuisine at M.A.K.E.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - Americans have been eating hot dogs since at least 1870, when a Coney Island restaurateur started selling sausages on long buns. In California's capital, hot-dog carts keep the tradition going with cheap, quick, lunches for state workers and tourists. But cart owners around the state are threatened with closure by health inspectors, unless lawmakers come to their rescue. That's why the Assembly Health Committee had to come up with a legal definition for "hot dog. " The proposed change to state health laws spells it out: "'Hot dog' means a whole, cured, cooked sausage that is skinless or stuffed in a casing that may be known as a frankfurter, frank, furter, wiener, red hot, Vienna, bologna, garlic bologna or knockwurst and that may be served in a bun or roll.
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HEALTH
April 4, 2005 | Emily Singer, Special to The Times
Vegetarians who follow a raw-food diet have lower bone density than those who consume a more typical American diet, researchers have found. But those bones might not be weak. Risk of fracture is linked to bone density and bone turnover -- a measure of how fast a bone breaks down and reforms. According to the new study, raw-food vegans often have a bone density low enough to be diagnosed with the bone disease osteoporosis, but show normal levels of two markers for bone turnover.
HEALTH
April 6, 2013 | By Martha Rose Shulman
What's a healthful food and what's a healing food? Is there a difference? At least since the mid-19th century, when the Battle Creek Sanitarium opened its doors and people flocked there to follow John Harvey Kellogg's regime of whole grains, nuts and frequent enemas, many Americans have sought food as medicine. I have a shelf of books with titles such as "Food - Your Miracle Medicine" and "The Food Pharmacy," and my smartphone is filled with snapshots of the "super foods" on display at a trade show: acai and goldenberry, chia, coconut and flax, goji berries and hemp, maca root and other berries, nuts, seaweeds and roots I've never heard of (yacon, lucuma, camu, maqui)
BUSINESS
October 28, 2011 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The bust had all the makings of a major criminal investigation. Ten law enforcement and regulatory agencies dedicated hundreds of hours of personnel to track the suspects. They used high-tech video equipment hidden on a utility pole for round-the-clock surveillance and undercover agents to make covert buys. This wasn't a major narcotics trafficking investigation or an attempt to take out a violent street gang — it was a crackdown on what authorities allege was illegal trafficking of raw goat milk, cheese and yogurt.
MAGAZINE
February 17, 2002 | MARA SCHWARTZ
We Southern Californians love our enchiladas--rolled, stacked, low-fat, meaty, vegetarian, green, red, suiza and mole. Oh, yeah, and raw. Chef Lesa Carlson is a raw food advocate who whips up tasty enchiladas without actually cooking a single ingredient--not to mention pizza, pasta, burgers and desserts.
FOOD
January 31, 2001 | EMILY GREEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As Pat Crowder settles down in the living room of the Burbank bungalow with her plate of food from the buffet, she isn't quite sure what she's eating. "There's some nut and banana with some kind of sauce," she says, poking around with a fork. "And some chicken with lemon, some salmon and cheesecake." But when a young man named James Hopson wanders by clutching a Mason jar in which bits of solids swim around in a gray-brown liquid, he knows exactly what he is spooning back. "It's steak," he says.
NEWS
January 25, 1998 | ELLEN KNICKMEYER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
After giving up meat for vegetarian cooking, fast food for organic cooking and sugar for macrobiotic cooking, 70 New Yorkers have gathered to get serious about the way they eat: They've given up cooking. On the menu at this recent "live" food potluck in a Tribeca loft: a "lasagna" of sprouted buckwheat, almonds, mushrooms, tomatoes and figs; a "cheese" of pulverized almonds; a "champagne" of something sprouted and fermented.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Raw, organic almonds form the basis of Karyn Calabrese's garlicky nut pate, her vegan pie crusts and vanilla ice cream custards. But under a new federal rule requiring that virtually all almonds be pasteurized to prevent food-borne illness, the Chicago restaurateur will have to substitute a new nut, or go to vast lengths to import her raw almonds from across the globe.
HEALTH
January 18, 2010 | By Barbara Lewis
My blood test results arrived in the mail last year -- and I was shocked. My report, with total cholesterol listed at 248, contained a handwritten note from my doctor in the margin: Come in to see me for medication. How could I have high cholesterol? I had been a vegetarian most of my life. I wasn't overweight. I exercised several times a week on the treadmill. And although high cholesterol can be genetic, I knew that my mother never had high cholesterol, and my father, who died in 1994, was never treated for cholesterol.
NEWS
January 24, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Interested in a vegan pop-up dinner with a four-course soy-, nut- and gluten-free menu? Clean Dinners, from health coach Stasha Washburn , pops up at Sustain Juicery downtown every Saturday. "The pop-up was inspired mostly by the fact that if I wanted to go out to eat, there were very few options," Washburn says. "If I wanted to have a nice evening out, I knew that I would pay for it the following morning. " So she decided to throw a weekly dinner party with food that fit her lifestyle, and she collaborated with Brian Lee, owner of Sustain Juicery.
NEWS
January 23, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Food Sovereignty Tours , a project of the Institute for Food and Development Policy (or Food First) in Oakland, will be traveling to Bolivia on March 9 to 18 to explore Andean food and farming systems. The tour will highlight quinoa grown in the Altiplano region and llamas, a source of meat, wool and transport, as both play a critical role in Andean food security. Participants will visit indigenous food markets, meet quinoa producers to learn about the grain-like crop and how global demand and increasing quinoa production is affecting surrounding soils and wetlands, and become familiar with organizations working with social movements that promote and strengthen food sovereignty.
NEWS
January 22, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
You don't have to be an adherent of raw food (nothing heated to more than 115 degrees) to appreciate some dishes in the raw. A story about the new raw food restaurant M.A.K.E. and its culinary academy uncovers a cuisine that's coming in from the fringe. (Who doesn't love zucchini "noodle" lasagna, anyway?) "I think now a lot of people who are not strict about raw food are incorporating it into their diets," says M.A.K.E. owner Matthew Kenney.  Much of the cuisine at M.A.K.E.
FOOD
January 19, 2013 | By Betty Hallock, Los Angeles Times
The kimchi dumplings at Matthew Kenney's M.A.K.E. restaurant in Santa Monica might be the poster dish for modern raw cuisine: origami-like bundles of cashews, pickled cabbage and tahini, packaged in wrappers made with dehydrated coconut purée mixed with cilantro juice so that they're bright green, and served with sesame-ginger foam, nasturtium flowers and micro-cilantro. Hello to the new raw food. The dumplings, one of the most popular items on the menu at the 3-month-old restaurant, reflect a culinary leap from that '80s raw food stalwart, zucchini "noodle" lasagna (though that's on the menu too - what one restaurant critic called the best version of this dish she's ever had)
SCIENCE
October 23, 2012 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Here's something for raw-food aficionados to chew on: Cooked food might be a big reason humans were able to grow such large brains compared to their body size, scientists say. If modern human ancestors had eaten only raw food, they'd have to regularly feed more than nine hours a day, according to a study published online Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. A pair of researchers from the Instituto Nacional de Neurociéncia Translacional in São Paulo, Brazil, decided to try and help explain why modern humans' brains were able to grow so large compared to their body size and why other primates' brains did not. They looked at the relative brain-to-neuron-counts of a host of primates, from owl monkeys to baboons.
HEALTH
June 9, 2012
There are easily dozens of cleanse diets. Some are juice fasts; others require only raw food or various combinations of liquid and solid food. Whether the cleanse that is the best known of them, the Master Cleanse, suits a body or not, it definitely suits the budget, requiring mainly lemon juice, pepper sauce and maple syrup. Others are more: • BluePrint Cleanse: $65 a day • Ritual Cleanse: $80 per day The federal government says the average woman requires 2,000 calories a day and the average man 2,600.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 1999 | CHARLES PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Welcome to O2, Woody Harrelson's Sunset Strip restaurant and oxygen bar. It looks sort of like a Roman ruin appointed with cobalt-blue chairs and stiff, canvas-like hemp fiber drapes, except that above the faux-weathered marble walls there's a colorful mural of a blazing star--perhaps distant Vega, where the vegan diet originated (OK, I might be wrong about that). Yes, O2's menu is vegan, meaning no meat, no eggs and no dairy products, and on top of that it's all raw.
MAGAZINE
October 8, 2006 | Shawn Hubler, Shawn Hubler is a senior writer for West.
It isn't easy to get philosophical while ramming raw beets into a juicer, but the lunch hour is waning and Roxanne Klein has a lot to say. "It's about evolution, I think," the onetime queen of the raw food movement is musing, knife in one hand, vegetable in the other. RRRrrrrrRRRRR!! She plants her bare feet on the checkerboard floor of her Mill Valley kitchen and shoves another chunk into the machine. "The food, the business," she says, smiling. "My own life." Perhaps you remember Klein.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2011 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Los Angeles Times
The bust had all the makings of a major criminal investigation. Ten law enforcement and regulatory agencies dedicated hundreds of hours of personnel to track the suspects. They used high-tech video equipment hidden on a utility pole for round-the-clock surveillance and undercover agents to make covert buys. This wasn't a major narcotics trafficking investigation or an attempt to take out a violent street gang — it was a crackdown on what authorities allege was illegal trafficking of raw goat milk, cheese and yogurt.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
A lettuce grower is expanding a recall of chopped romaine because of possible listeria contamination to nearly 2,500 cartons across the United States, federal and company officials say. The recall is unrelated to the recall of tainted cantaloupes after a deadly multi-state outbreak of listeria monocytogenes, said Food and Drug Administration press officer Tamara Ward. "There have been no illnesses," Ward added. True Leaf Farms has expanded its recall of 90 cartons of lettuce to cover 2,498 cartons shipped to at least 21 states and Canada.
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