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ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2004
Re "Partisan '9/11' Signals New Era for Documentaries," by David Macaray, July 12): Documentary 101 in college will start with the "rude awakening" that, by merely turning the camera to focus on a subject, the documentarian is already making a "statement" film -- namely, that the film's subject warrants attention. Leni Riefenstahl knew and documentarians today know that the "raw" footage can be collated, edited and combined to propound many points of view. "Woodstock" raw footage could have easily been used to demonstrate the decay of modern civilization in a bacchanal of drugs and self-indulgence instead of a celebration of youth, music, tolerance and love.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Cristy Lytal
In the making of "Argo," editor William Goldenberg cut a million feet of film - more than 185 hours of raw footage - into a two-hour movie. "Argo," directed by and starring Ben Affleck, tells the story of the 1980 CIA-Canadian operation to rescue six fugitive American diplomatic personnel, disguised as a film crew, from revolutionary Iran. Goldenberg selected shots and assembled them into sequences ranging from the suspenseful intensity of the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran to the comic absurdity of a Hollywood read-through of a bogus sci-fi film.
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HEALTH
September 6, 2012 | By Hilary MacGregor
The first question is whether you want documentary evidence of childbirth. If the answer is yes, there are a few things to consider: Pros : Mothers can catch magical moments they missed during the event itself. Cons : Professionals say mothers must be careful who is invited into the birthing space. Maternal stress can hinder the actual birth. Cost : Jodie Myers (www.mybirthmovie.com) charges $1,395 for raw footage of a home-birth, up to $3,500 for an edited, documentary-quality short film shot in the hospital.
HEALTH
September 6, 2012 | By Hilary MacGregor
The first question is whether you want documentary evidence of childbirth. If the answer is yes, there are a few things to consider: Pros : Mothers can catch magical moments they missed during the event itself. Cons : Professionals say mothers must be careful who is invited into the birthing space. Maternal stress can hinder the actual birth. Cost : Jodie Myers (www.mybirthmovie.com) charges $1,395 for raw footage of a home-birth, up to $3,500 for an edited, documentary-quality short film shot in the hospital.
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
They've got the lights and the camera, but it's all about the action at the Tinseltown Digital Video Film School, a hands-on, seat-of-your-pants video class that teaches students how to film, light, microphone, edit, title and score a short movie in one day. Class size is restricted to six students, who work as a team, going out in the field to collect raw footage, then return to class to learn how to turn it into a movie. "The only way you learn is by doing," said Sheeraz Hasan, Tinseltown's chief executive.
NEWS
November 29, 2012 | By Cristy Lytal
In the making of "Argo," editor William Goldenberg cut a million feet of film - more than 185 hours of raw footage - into a two-hour movie. "Argo," directed by and starring Ben Affleck, tells the story of the 1980 CIA-Canadian operation to rescue six fugitive American diplomatic personnel, disguised as a film crew, from revolutionary Iran. Goldenberg selected shots and assembled them into sequences ranging from the suspenseful intensity of the 1979 takeover of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran to the comic absurdity of a Hollywood read-through of a bogus sci-fi film.
OPINION
September 4, 2012
We want sophisticated technology to protect us. But we don't want it to stalk us. A new aerial surveillance system that the city of Lancaster put into place last week to reduce crime has the potential to do both, although with some strict monitoring, it might accomplish the former without subjecting residents to the latter. Officials in the high-desert city unveiled a program in which a small plane, manned by a pilot and equipped with cameras capturing real-time video footage of the landscape below, will fly in a loop at 3,000 feet.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2009 | By David Zucchino and Julian E. Barnes
Iraqi insurgents have intercepted live video feeds from U.S. Predator drones, tapping a key component of the Pentagon's vaunted surveillance and weapons system with a $26 program available on the Internet. Militants did not hack into any military communications systems, officials said, but instead were able to view raw satellite feeds of live video shot by cameras on the unmanned 27-foot planes. The drones, flown by pilots based in the U.S., use satellite feeds to transmit video. Officials said they have evidence that video feeds were intercepted in Iraq and do not believe any feeds were intercepted in Afghanistan or Pakistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
One year ago, after putting in a full day of work at her local department store, Betsy DelValley got home and pulled out her video camera. It was July 24, 2010, the day that YouTube launched an experimental project asking users of the social media site worldwide to submit videos about what transpired in their lives over 24 hours. The best submissions would later be culled together for a documentary film. DelValley, then 19, was intrigued by the undertaking. The problem was, nothing all that exciting had transpired on the day she was meant to film.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Sundance has always had a real "come-as-you-are" attitude, but its unlikely anyone has ever shown up as pregnant as Kim Roberts. "Nine months and two weeks and I still made it," she says with pride. She took the journey from New Orleans with her doctor's approval because "it's an opportunity for me to get the story out. I had to make it, by any means necessary." Roberts, along with her husband, Scott, who also made the trip, are more than the central figures in "Trouble the Water."
OPINION
September 4, 2012
We want sophisticated technology to protect us. But we don't want it to stalk us. A new aerial surveillance system that the city of Lancaster put into place last week to reduce crime has the potential to do both, although with some strict monitoring, it might accomplish the former without subjecting residents to the latter. Officials in the high-desert city unveiled a program in which a small plane, manned by a pilot and equipped with cameras capturing real-time video footage of the landscape below, will fly in a loop at 3,000 feet.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2011 | By Amy Kaufman, Los Angeles Times
One year ago, after putting in a full day of work at her local department store, Betsy DelValley got home and pulled out her video camera. It was July 24, 2010, the day that YouTube launched an experimental project asking users of the social media site worldwide to submit videos about what transpired in their lives over 24 hours. The best submissions would later be culled together for a documentary film. DelValley, then 19, was intrigued by the undertaking. The problem was, nothing all that exciting had transpired on the day she was meant to film.
NATIONAL
December 18, 2009 | By David Zucchino and Julian E. Barnes
Iraqi insurgents have intercepted live video feeds from U.S. Predator drones, tapping a key component of the Pentagon's vaunted surveillance and weapons system with a $26 program available on the Internet. Militants did not hack into any military communications systems, officials said, but instead were able to view raw satellite feeds of live video shot by cameras on the unmanned 27-foot planes. The drones, flown by pilots based in the U.S., use satellite feeds to transmit video. Officials said they have evidence that video feeds were intercepted in Iraq and do not believe any feeds were intercepted in Afghanistan or Pakistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2008 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Sundance has always had a real "come-as-you-are" attitude, but its unlikely anyone has ever shown up as pregnant as Kim Roberts. "Nine months and two weeks and I still made it," she says with pride. She took the journey from New Orleans with her doctor's approval because "it's an opportunity for me to get the story out. I had to make it, by any means necessary." Roberts, along with her husband, Scott, who also made the trip, are more than the central figures in "Trouble the Water."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2004
Re "Partisan '9/11' Signals New Era for Documentaries," by David Macaray, July 12): Documentary 101 in college will start with the "rude awakening" that, by merely turning the camera to focus on a subject, the documentarian is already making a "statement" film -- namely, that the film's subject warrants attention. Leni Riefenstahl knew and documentarians today know that the "raw" footage can be collated, edited and combined to propound many points of view. "Woodstock" raw footage could have easily been used to demonstrate the decay of modern civilization in a bacchanal of drugs and self-indulgence instead of a celebration of youth, music, tolerance and love.
NEWS
November 14, 2002 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
They've got the lights and the camera, but it's all about the action at the Tinseltown Digital Video Film School, a hands-on, seat-of-your-pants video class that teaches students how to film, light, microphone, edit, title and score a short movie in one day. Class size is restricted to six students, who work as a team, going out in the field to collect raw footage, then return to class to learn how to turn it into a movie. "The only way you learn is by doing," said Sheeraz Hasan, Tinseltown's chief executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1993 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times national and international news services and the nations press
European News Network: CNN has a competitor. Euronews was launched on New Year's Day as Europe's alternative to the Altanta-based cable station. Based in Lyon, France, Euronews began with an image of London's Big Ben striking midnight to mark the start of the European Community's single market. Stories were done by about 50 young journalists who used raw footage from government-owned TV stations and added voice-overs in English, French, German, Italian and Spanish.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2001
In Susan King's "Marilyn Monroe's Last Film Work Resurrected for New Documentary" (May 28), about the unfinished Fox movie "Something's Got to Give," she reports that Kevin Burns "was 'blown away' when he found the 9 1/2 hours of footage during his research." I wonder where Burns was searching? Back in 1989, Fox Entertainment News reporter Henry Schipper, KTTV editor Ken Turner and I also "found" the various reels of raw footage in the Fox vault. We presented the material to then Fox Chairman Barry Diller, who commissioned a documentary on the subject.
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