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NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama on Tuesday morning launched a challenge to China's export restrictions on rare earth and other raw materials as part of a broader effort to free up supply lines to global high-tech industries. The U.S. will join with the European Union and Japan in pressing the case with the World Trade Organization, in hopes that it can pressure Chinese officials to relax restrictions during preliminary consultations over the next two months. "We've got to take control of our energy future and we cannot let that energy industry take root in some other country because they were allowed to break the rules," Obama told reporters in the White House Rose Garden.
ARTICLES BY DATE
IMAGE
February 28, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In today's creative scene, where art, fashion and design converge, Santa Monica fragrance designer Haley Alexander van Oosten is adding scent to the cultural mix. Collaborating with everyone from style maven/photographer Lisa Eisner and designer and artist David Wiseman to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Maxfield and Commune design, Van Oosten is making a name for herself by challenging traditional notions of fragrance. "I find commercial perfumery to be a very limited medium," says Van Oosten, whose company name, L'Oeil du Vert, means "eye of the green.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 2008 | TOM PETRUNO
When the dot-com mania of the late 1990s ended in ruin, many burned investors vowed, "I'll never do that again." Which is one reason the boom in prices of oil, gold, wheat and other commodities in this decade -- and particularly in the first quarter of this year -- has been viewed with plenty of suspicion. You've seen this movie before, you figure. But as the first quarter ends, it's going to be tough for people to look away from the gains that commodity-related investments racked up.
IMAGE
September 30, 2012 | By Denise Hamilton
Brent Leonesio of West Hollywood became a perfumisto at age 12 when his mother bought him a bottle of Hermes' Eau D'Orange Vert. He was astonished at how the perfumer had captured the scent of a real orange. But it wasn't until he was an adult and in the process of being laid off as a buyer for a high-end retail store that Leonesio decided to parlay his unemployment checks into perfumery. Ordering raw materials and technical books online, he began to teach himself the ancient art. PHOTOS: Indie perfumers In 2009, Leonesio launched Smell Bent, relying on a colorful website, word-of-mouth and modest prices (most bottles are less than $50)
BUSINESS
August 16, 2008 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Everything that went right for commodities in the first half of this year now is going very wrong -- and fast. Investors and traders are bailing out of bets on raw materials as fears of a worldwide recession grow and the suddenly robust dollar lures money at commodities' expense. Oil, platinum, gold, cocoa and most other hard assets were routed again Friday, which should make consumers feel better even as it sends some unlucky traders to the poorhouse. Crude oil futures fell $1.24 to $113.
BUSINESS
January 23, 1985 | Associated Press
The International Monetary Fund says world prices paid for raw materials dropped considerably in the second half of 1984 and were still falling in December, which translates into bad news for impoverished exporting countries. The drop amounted to a sharp 7% in the summer quarter and another 3.5% in the fall quarter, of which nearly half came in December.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1997 | BARBARA MARSH
Makers of implantable medical devices have hopes that federal lawmakers soon will make it easier for them to obtain raw materials. U.S. Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach) told a private meeting of local industry executives last week that chances look good for congressional passage this fall of legislation that would limit product liability for producers of "biomaterials" used in devices.
BUSINESS
March 6, 2005 | Tom Petruno, Times Staff Writer
Cleveland-Cliffs Inc. has not discovered a cure for cancer, nor has it patented a new Internet search technology. The company does something that Wall Street finds much more exciting these days: It mines iron ore pellets in the wilds of Michigan, Minnesota and Canada. Cleveland-Cliffs shares have rocketed from $25 in July to a record high of $86.19 as of Friday, a 245% gain. If you were chasing after Google Inc. late last summer, it would seem that you were missing a far bigger opportunity.
BUSINESS
September 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
The economy cooled in August but not enough to put the freeze on inflation, according to a widely followed survey of industrial companies released Thursday. The National Assn. of Purchasing Management's report for August shows activity at the nation's factories expanded at a much weaker pace than at any time in the last eight months, suggesting that the economy is slowing.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Clorox Co. said fiscal third-quarter earnings fell 6.3%, hurt by higher costs for raw materials. The company forecast that profit next year will be below some analysts' estimates, sending the shares down $5.15, or 8%, to $58.53 on the New York Stock Exchange. Net income fell to $118 million from $126 million a year earlier, Oakland-based Clorox said. Per-share profit climbed to 76 cents from 59 cents after the company bought back more than one-fourth of its shares. Sales rose 3.3% to $1.
OPINION
August 24, 2012
Re "Illegal scrap yards heaping up," Aug. 22 Illegal scrap yard operators are actually some of America's true entrepreneurs. They add value to materials that often would be buried in our landfills. Our elected officials must make recycling easier and our citizens must vote to allow the officials the money to do so. About $11 billion worth of our resources was bulldozed into the ground in 2010, according the nonprofit group As You Sow, which promotes environmental and social corporate responsibility.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2012 | By Holly Myers
There were 122 pieces in Matjames Metson's weeklong exhibition at Coagula Curatorial this month: assemblage works of every size and shape, hung nearly edge to edge across the gallery's three adjacent walls, with a handful of free-standing sculptures placed around the floor. Each piece consisted of countless smaller elements, all common objects marked by the traces of some previous life. Pencils, matches, rulers, typewriter keys, jewelry, watch parts, bones, stamps, nails, hardware, scraps of handwritten letters, pages of books and scores of vintage photographs - Metson's materials come with stories of their own, which he weaves into eloquent, finely wrought, 3-D compositions, no inch of which goes bare or unconsidered.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
With crude prices bouncing around above $90 a barrel, many companies are trying to wring the oil out of their operations. Ford Motor Co.is using soybean foam in its upholstery.McDonald's Corp.is testing paper cups for hot drinks in place of polystyrene containers, which start out as petroleum.Coca-Cola Co.andPepsiCo Inc.are becoming bioplastic bottlers. And a California cleaning products manufacturer has set out to eliminate diesel from its fleet. "When oil was cheap, it became pervasive throughout our economy in hundreds and hundreds of invisible ways, as a raw material," said Daniel Yergin, an energy consultant who wrotea Pulitzer Prize-winninghistory of the oil industry.
NEWS
March 13, 2012 | By Christi Parsons
President Obama on Tuesday morning launched a challenge to China's export restrictions on rare earth and other raw materials as part of a broader effort to free up supply lines to global high-tech industries. The U.S. will join with the European Union and Japan in pressing the case with the World Trade Organization, in hopes that it can pressure Chinese officials to relax restrictions during preliminary consultations over the next two months. "We've got to take control of our energy future and we cannot let that energy industry take root in some other country because they were allowed to break the rules," Obama told reporters in the White House Rose Garden.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2011 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
Energy prices led a renewed plunge in commodities Wednesday after government data showed accumulating stockpiles of crude oil and gasoline — and weaker demand. A fresh surge in the dollar also helped depress the market for raw materials by raising the cost of commodities for foreign buyers. Crude futures for delivery next month tumbled $5.67, or 5.4%, to $98.21 a barrel in New York trading, their second decline below the $100 mark since late last week. Gasoline futures plunged 26 cents, or 7.6%, to $3.12 a gallon.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2011 | By Tom Petruno, Los Angeles Times
The stampede into commodities has become a mad rush for the exits. The market for raw materials staged a blistering retreat Thursday as fresh economic data revived worries about global economic growth and as selling fed on itself. Crude oil in New York plunged almost $10 a barrel, with near-term futures closing below $100 a barrel for the first time in seven weeks. Silver, which had been on a tear this year, sank for the fourth straight day, leaving it down 25% from a 31-year high set a week ago. The Thomson Reuters/Jefferies CRB index, a broad gauge of raw-material prices, sank 4.9% its fourth straight decline and its biggest drop this year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2001
In a study that strengthens the likelihood that solar systems like our own are still being formed, Caltech researchers report in today's Nature that three young stars in the sun's neighborhood have the raw materials necessary for the formation of Jupiter-sized planets. Data from the European Space Agency's Infrared Space Observatory indicate that molecular hydrogen is present in the debris disks around young nearby stars.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Higher prices for rubber and oil let the air out of earnings reported Wednesday by tire makers Continental and Bridgestone. Both companies reported smaller profits in part because of the higher prices they had to pay for raw materials, along with charges related to the closing of plants in the United States. Tokyo-based Bridgestone Corp., which is vying with France's Michelin to be the world's biggest tire maker, said it earned 50 billion yen ($427.
BUSINESS
April 30, 2011 | Tom Petruno, Market Beat
There are few worse feelings for investors than to suspect that they were the last ones into a red-hot market. So it was with the dot-com stock mania of the late 1990s and the California housing bubble of the last decade. Many of the last entrants to those markets, if they weren't quick to jump, suffered catastrophic losses when the booms turned to bust. This year, investors tempted by soaring commodity prices may have that same gnawing fear of being too late to the party. This is, after all, the second big commodity bull run in three years.
BUSINESS
April 29, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Three years after China was rocked by a scandal over deadly tainted milk, the country is once again grappling with concerns over food safety. In recent weeks, reports of tainted food have surfaced throughout China. The list includes diseased pigs used for bacon; noodles made of corn, ink and paraffin; rice contaminated with heavy metals; sausages made of rotten meat and fertilizer; and pork described as "Tron blue" because bacteria made it glow in the dark. The central government implemented a sweeping food-safety law in 2009 after at least six infants died and tens of thousands of people were sickened by milk adulterated with melamine.
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