Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRaw Sewage
IN THE NEWS

Raw Sewage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Here's a posting from the "ick" files. Scientsts are now delving into an uncharted environment to study human and other viruses: raw sewage. In a study published Tuesday in the online journal mBio, researchers from the U.S. and Spainfound that untreated human wastewater -- "the effluence of society," they wrote -- contains an incredible diversity of viruses ... and that the vast majority are viruses we hadn't known of before. Click for the abstract . At this point, biologists know of about 3,000 different viruses, representing 84 different viral families -- but they suspect that those known bugs are just the tip of the iceberg.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 6, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Here's a posting from the "ick" files. Scientsts are now delving into an uncharted environment to study human and other viruses: raw sewage. In a study published Tuesday in the online journal mBio, researchers from the U.S. and Spainfound that untreated human wastewater -- "the effluence of society," they wrote -- contains an incredible diversity of viruses ... and that the vast majority are viruses we hadn't known of before. Click for the abstract . At this point, biologists know of about 3,000 different viruses, representing 84 different viral families -- but they suspect that those known bugs are just the tip of the iceberg.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Construction workers Tuesday plugged a hole in a main sewer pipe that had leaked millions of gallons of wastewater into an ecological reserve. The 10-inch hole sent more than 5 million gallons of raw sewage into the Buena Vista Lagoon, a freshwater lake between Carlsbad and Oceanside that is home to many fish and bird species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2010 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
A major sewage spill that has closed a two-mile stretch of beach near Marina del Rey released about 500,000 gallons of raw sewage into a storm drain that runs to Ballona Creek and eventually spills into the ocean, authorities said. The spill ranks among the worst in the last two years along the Los Angeles County coastline. The beach will probably remain closed for three days. Residents reported a manhole overflowing with sewage near Centinela Avenue and Sepulveda Boulevard about 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, said Ron Charles, spokesman for the Los Angeles Public Works Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 2003 | From Times staff reports
The Harbor Patrol Dock at the East Basin of Dana Point Harbor was closed to swimmers Tuesday after a small amount of raw sewage leaked from a vessel pump-out station. The leak was caused by a small opening in the piping that goes from the pump that boaters use to clear their sewage tanks to the disposal line onshore, said Monica Mazur of the Orange County Health Care Agency. The affected area will remain closed to water sports until follow-up testing shows the water meets acceptable standards.
NEWS
July 13, 1988 | United Press International
About 20 million gallons of raw sewage poured into the waters off Staten Island on Tuesday after a power failure at a sewage treatment plant, officials said. Sewage became backed up when power to the Port Richmond Pollution Control Plant failed Monday afternoon, and millions of gallons of untreated waste went into Kill Van Kull, the narrow waterway between Bayonne, N. J., and Staten Island.
NEWS
January 18, 1985 | Associated Press
A raft, canoe and kayak race that was a summer tradition here for 16 years will be canceled because raw sewage found in the waterway may be hazardous to contestants, organizers said Thursday. Sponsors of the Campbell Creek Classic decided that the creek contains too much untreated sewage to allow persons to splash or swim in the water. The race, scheduled for June, may be replaced with a picnic, said Don Mueller of the Anchorage Jaycees, which sponsors the event.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A broken pipeline a block from the coast sent 12,000 gallons of raw sewage into the ocean off Laguna Beach, resulting in the closure of 1 1/2 miles of shoreline Tuesday, said Monica Mazur, spokeswoman for the county's Health Care Agency. The agency closed three-quarters of a mile north and south of Sleepy Hollow Lane, where the spill occurred Monday night. The beach will remain closed until at least Friday, or until water quality meets health standards, Mazur said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1996
More than two miles of beach has been closed after a pipeline pump failed, spilling 100,000 gallons of raw sewage into the ocean, a city official said Thursday. The accident happened Tuesday night when a large pump forcing sewage to a city treatment plant stopped, said Jay Elston, a San Clemente utility supervisor. Elston said the county's Health Care Agency, which monitors spills, was notified immediately and signs warning the public not to enter the water were posted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 1985
More than 110,000 gallons of raw sewage spilled into Glorietta Bay Sunday afternoon, causing the San Diego County Board of Health to close the Coronado inlet to all activities involving contact with the water, a Coronado police spokesman said. The spill, the result of a pump leak at the Coronado Municipal Sanitation Station, was discovered shortly after noon, according to Supervisor Gary Rapp of the Coronado Police Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2010 | By Martha Groves, Los Angeles Times
Responding to community outrage over the dumping of raw sewage onto the streets of Venice, Los Angeles City Atty. Carmen Trutanich said Wednesday that he intended to file criminal charges against a motor home dweller who was arrested but released after serving two days in jail. "When it hits the fan, it hits my office too," Trutanich said of the dumping, which a longtime Neighborhood Watch captain witnessed last week and reported to police. City crews finally cleaned up the mess Tuesday, but only after residents had complained for several days to various city and county agencies.
OPINION
June 9, 2010 | Mitchell Koss
While keeping in mind that this is a family newspaper, let's talk about poop. When you flush your toilet here in Los Angeles, the waste is likely to end up at the Hyperion Treatment Plant in El Segundo, which every day receives enough raw sewage to fill the Rose Bowl several times over. At Hyperion, the sewage is processed via a series of pipes and giant tanks until the solid waste is sufficiently pathogen free to be trucked off as fertilizer. There isn't even any odor, for that too is captured in pipes and processed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The city has shut down more than three miles of beachfront after a raw sewage spill into the Los Angeles River. Long Beach Recreational Water Manager Nelson Kerr says that 65,000 to 90,000 gallons of raw sewage entered the river Tuesday night. The city closed the beaches as a precaution because it is the end point of the Los Angeles River before it flows into the ocean. Kerr said city officials would test the water today before reopening the beaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Construction workers Tuesday plugged a hole in a main sewer pipe that had leaked millions of gallons of wastewater into an ecological reserve. The 10-inch hole sent more than 5 million gallons of raw sewage into the Buena Vista Lagoon, a freshwater lake between Carlsbad and Oceanside that is home to many fish and bird species.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2007 | Sharon Bernstein and Angie Green, Times Staff Writers
Los Angeles County public health officials closed portions of three beaches this week after three unrelated sewage spills. The spills, all relatively minor, occurred Tuesday afternoon and resulted in partial closure of Will Rogers State Beach, Dockweiler State Beach and Venice Beach. If water testing shows bacterial levels to be normal, the beaches will be reopened this afternoon. The spills added to jitters regionwide about sewage contaminating beaches.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2007 | Tony Barboza, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County public health officials failed to document more than 90% of raw sewage spills that have occurred since 2002, largely because city, county and state agencies did not report them, according to a study released Wednesday. Most of the 208 potentially health-threatening sewage spills between January 2002 and July 2006 were neither officially recorded nor cleaned up, according to the 24-page report by the Los Angeles County auditor-controller.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1998 | ROBERT GAMMON
About 200 gallons of raw sewage bubbled out of a clogged sewer pipe, onto the pavement and down a storm drain near Ventura Harbor on Thursday afternoon, officials said. However, none of the effluent reached the ocean. City officials quickly turned off the water to nearby businesses and homes, which stopped the sewage from being flushed into the harbor. "We are convinced that it was all contained," said Bob Gallagher, community services manager of the county Environmental Health Division.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1992
Repair crews Saturday stemmed the county's worst sewage spill in a decade, stopping the 400,000-gallon-a-day flow of raw sewage pouring into the Arroyo Simi flood control channel in Moorpark, authorities said. Two bypass lines on different sections of a leaking pipe were completed and two pumps were installed to suck sewage from the pipeline, said Reddy Pakala, manager of the Ventura County Water Works Districts. "Everything went as we expected," Pakala said.
NATIONAL
September 14, 2005 | Ralph Vartabedian and Marla Cone, Times Staff Writers
The high-stakes effort to bail out New Orleans is sending plumes of contaminated, brown, stinking water into Lake Pontchartrain, setting back years of effort to restore the environmentally sensitive home of Gulf Coast marine life. After festering for two weeks in neighborhoods, commercial districts and industrial zones, the water is laden with bacteria, silt, petroleum products and possibly toxic substances.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|