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Raw Sewage

NEWS
July 18, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This tiny rural hamlet now sits sunken under the murky, fetid waters of the swollen Mississippi River. Tim Shoemaker, a 25-year-old sheet metal worker, gets to and from his house by boat, navigating a tricky course past the tops of cottonwoods and maple trees and a royal blue pickup truck, submerged except for its cab. He has weeks of cleanup ahead, and the prospect of illness is on his mind.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A backed-up pipe produced a torrent of raw sewage that washed down on Superior Court files at the downtown San Diego courthouse Friday, the latest in a string of physical woes to befall the dilapidated structure. The sewage rained down on several hundred files in the third-floor records room at the courthouse, where some 12,000 civil case files are kept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1999 | FRED ALVAREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A power failure at a municipal waste-water treatment plant Monday unleashed 250,000 gallons of raw sewage into the city's marina, forcing the closure of Ventura Harbor for the second time in a week. A contractor working near the treatment plant hit and damaged the main power line to the facility about 11:30 a.m., disabling the pump systems and forcing untreated waste water to gush out of manholes along Navigator Drive.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992 | BERNICE HIRABAYASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Heal the Bay President Dorothy Green wore an especially large smile for the crowd of about 200 people gathered before her last week. And she had good reason. After seven years of lobbying local waste-water authorities to raise standards for treating sewage, she was finally able to participate in the opening of a new sewer line that promises to end the dumping of raw sewage into Santa Monica Bay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2008 | From the Associated Press
The city has shut down more than three miles of beachfront after a raw sewage spill into the Los Angeles River. Long Beach Recreational Water Manager Nelson Kerr says that 65,000 to 90,000 gallons of raw sewage entered the river Tuesday night. The city closed the beaches as a precaution because it is the end point of the Los Angeles River before it flows into the ocean. Kerr said city officials would test the water today before reopening the beaches.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | United Press International
About 174,000 gallons of raw sewage spilled into the Willamette River just hours after the city was fined in connection with similar spills last month. A blocked screen caused the spill Tuesday, officials said. Earlier, the city was fined $5,000 for failing to immediately report two other spills.
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