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BUSINESS
October 21, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court in Los Angeles has issued a warrant for the arrest of an Orange County exporter who failed to return this week from his native Iran for sentencing in the United States. U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp on Monday also set a hearing for Dec. 21 to determine if the three homes used to secure Reza (Ray) Panjtan Amiri's $200,000 bond should be forfeited. The properties were put up by Amiri's friends and relatives, Assistant U.S. Atty. Patricia Beaman said.
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BUSINESS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Iranian Held Without Bail in Export Case: An Iranian businessman suspected of making shipments to Iran of electronic testing gear that can be used in producing nuclear weapons and guided missiles was ordered held without bail. U.S. Magistrate Judge Volney V. Brown Jr. said Reza Amiri, 43, was a flight risk and a danger to national security. Brown set bail at $50,000 for Mohammed Danesh, 55, a U.S. citizen who ran the Newport Beach office of Amiri's company, Ray Amiri Computer Consultants.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1992
The U.S. Commerce Department this week renewed a temporary order to deny a Newport Beach company and its two Iranian managers from the export business. The order expires Nov. 28. The firm, Ray Amiri Computer Consultants, and its managers--Reza Panjtan Amiri and Mohammad Danesh--are accused of violating U.S. export regulations by shipping restricted high-tech equipment to Iran.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1992
The U.S. Commerce Department this week renewed a temporary order to deny a Newport Beach company and its two Iranian managers from the export business. The order expires Nov. 28. The firm, Ray Amiri Computer Consultants, and its managers--Reza Panjtan Amiri and Mohammad Danesh--are accused of violating U.S. export regulations by shipping restricted high-tech equipment to Iran.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Federal agents arrested two Iranian citizens Wednesday in Newport Beach on charges of violating U.S. export regulations by shipping restricted high-tech equipment to Iran, the Commerce Department said. Agents for the department arrested Reza Amiri, 43, and Don Danesh, 55, of Ray Amiri Computer Consultants for allegedly selling unlicensed portable oscilloscopes to Iran, said Brooks Ohlson, special agent in charge of the Commerce Department's office of export enforcement in Newport Beach.
BUSINESS
October 21, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A federal court in Los Angeles has issued a warrant for the arrest of an Orange County exporter who failed to return this week from his native Iran for sentencing in the United States. U.S. District Judge Harry L. Hupp on Monday also set a hearing for Dec. 21 to determine if the three homes used to secure Reza (Ray) Panjtan Amiri's $200,000 bond should be forfeited. The properties were put up by Amiri's friends and relatives, Assistant U.S. Atty. Patricia Beaman said.
BUSINESS
November 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Newport Firm Hit With Export Ban: The U.S. Department of Commerce temporarily barred a Newport Beach firm and its two principals from any export activity. The order bans Reza (Ray) Amiri, an Iranian national; his company, Ray Amiri Computer Consultants, and its manager, Mohammad (Don) Danesh, from exporting any goods from the United States for a 180-day period that began Tuesday. Amiri and Danesh were arrested Aug.
BUSINESS
April 1, 1992 | Cristina Lee, Times staff writer
Two executives of a Newport Beach company who pleaded guilty this week to charges that they illegally shipped sensitive electronic equipment to Iran decided to settle the case because the U.S. government's offer was too good to ignore, lawyers for the two men said Tuesday. "The government made an attractive offer to my client," said Mark E. Beck, an attorney for one of the defendants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two principals of a Newport Beach company pleaded guilty Monday to charges that they illegally shipped electronic equipment to Iran that could be used in making nuclear weapons and missile guidance systems, according to the U.S. attorney's office.
BUSINESS
August 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Iranian Held Without Bail in Export Case: An Iranian businessman suspected of making shipments to Iran of electronic testing gear that can be used in producing nuclear weapons and guided missiles was ordered held without bail. U.S. Magistrate Judge Volney V. Brown Jr. said Reza Amiri, 43, was a flight risk and a danger to national security. Brown set bail at $50,000 for Mohammed Danesh, 55, a U.S. citizen who ran the Newport Beach office of Amiri's company, Ray Amiri Computer Consultants.
BUSINESS
August 29, 1991 | DEAN TAKAHASHI
Federal agents arrested two Iranian citizens Wednesday in Newport Beach on charges of violating U.S. export regulations by shipping restricted high-tech equipment to Iran, the Commerce Department said. Agents for the department arrested Reza Amiri, 43, and Don Danesh, 55, of Ray Amiri Computer Consultants for allegedly selling unlicensed portable oscilloscopes to Iran, said Brooks Ohlson, special agent in charge of the Commerce Department's office of export enforcement in Newport Beach.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The owner of a Newport Beach firm and a company manager were indicted Thursday on charges of illegally exporting to Iran electronic testing and measuring equipment that could be used to develop missile guidance systems and nuclear weapons. Reza (Ray) Amiri, 43, an Iranian national and owner of Ray Amiri Computer Consultants, and Mohammed (Don) Danesh, 55, the firm's operations manager, were charged in a 17-count indictment in federal court in Los Angeles. The men were arrested Aug.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1991 | Cristina Lee / Times staff writer
Reza (Raymond) Amiri, one of two Iranian nationals arrested two weeks ago for allegedly selling electronics equipment to their homeland without an export license, is expected to have a new attorney at his bail hearing today. Victor Sherman, a Santa Monica criminal lawyer, is set to represent Amiri before U.S. Magistrate John R. Kronenberg in federal court in Los Angeles. In a statement through his new lawyer, Amiri said he replaced Bruce M.
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