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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
With Ray Anderson's herky-jerky trombone melodies anchored by Allan Jaffe's jabbing guitar and Pheeroan ak Laff's earthy drums, "What Because" is a far thornier proposition than 1988's "Blues Bred in the Bone" album. It's an eclectic mixture, from the skewered trading of fours on "Rave-a-ning" to Ellington's classic "I'm Just a Lucky So-And-So" and the romantic "Waltz for Phoebe."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1990 | DON SNOWDEN
With Ray Anderson's herky-jerky trombone melodies anchored by Allan Jaffe's jabbing guitar and Pheeroan ak Laff's earthy drums, "What Because" is a far thornier proposition than 1988's "Blues Bred in the Bone" album. It's an eclectic mixture, from the skewered trading of fours on "Rave-a-ning" to Ellington's classic "I'm Just a Lucky So-And-So" and the romantic "Waltz for Phoebe."
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Ray Anderson is the most talked-about performer in a sparsely populated field. His apparent aim is to play the trombone higher, lower and wilder than anyone else, and to bring together the past, present and future of the horn in one fell swoop. For his efforts he has earned critical praise and has won the last four Down Beat polls.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Ray Anderson is the most talked-about performer in a sparsely populated field. His apparent aim is to play the trombone higher, lower and wilder than anyone else, and to bring together the past, present and future of the horn in one fell swoop. For his efforts he has earned critical praise and has won the last four Down Beat polls.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Ray Anderson is all but unknown in Los Angeles, yet his reputation in New York and around Europe is legendary. Friday evening, returning to the Montreal Festival where he triumphed two years ago, the 38-year-old Chicagoan was armed and dangerous: Armed with a trombone, he is an outrageous, brash, florid chance-taker who is liable to tear off an avant garde 1990 solo using a 1930-style Tricky Sam Nanton plunger mute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2001
Re "Executing the Retarded Is a Shameful Legal Relic," Commentary, June 26: "With effort, Johnny Ray Anderson could figure out that one plus one was two. Two plus two, however, was beyond him," started yet another anti-death penalty story. Yet Anderson was smart enough to kill. Nowhere do the writers mention the crime(s) of Anderson. It never mentions the pain and suffering the victims' families endured. This anti-death penalty infomercial proves once again how biased the media are when it comes to covering the death penalty issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1991 | DON SNOWDEN
** Dr. John, David (Fathead) Newman, others, "Bluesiana II," Windham Hill. Art Blakey's death removed the jazz leg of the original Bluesiana Triangle collaboration, and "II" sounds more like a Dr. John record featuring saxophonist Newman, trombonist Ray Anderson and Living Colour drummer Will Calhoun. Calhoun adds a rock-solid pulse, but the song-oriented material soars only with Anderson's whoops and smears on "Dr. Blooze" and "Cowan Woman" and on the deep blues of "San Antone."
NEWS
May 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
Two men--in Texas and Missouri--were executed early today by lethal injection. Leonard Laws, 40, was executed for participating in the robbery and shotgun slayings of an elderly couple. He was the second Missouri death row inmate to be executed in the last six days and the third this year. Of the six inmates executed in the United States this year, three have been from Missouri.
REAL ESTATE
May 8, 1988
Leisure Technology, developer of Leisure Village Ocean Hills in Oceanside, and adult communities in New Jersey, New York, California and Illinois, has formed a new division to take advantage of the burgeoning south Florida housing market.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 1990 | LEONARD FEATHER
Ray Anderson is all but unknown in Los Angeles, yet his reputation in New York and around Europe is legendary. Friday evening, returning to the Montreal Festival where he triumphed two years ago, the 38-year-old Chicagoan was armed and dangerous: Armed with a trombone, he is an outrageous, brash, florid chance-taker who is liable to tear off an avant garde 1990 solo using a 1930-style Tricky Sam Nanton plunger mute.
NEWS
December 4, 1986
An environmental impact report on a county proposal to build residential and commercial projects in Frank G. Bonelli Regional Park is incomplete, and Supervisor Pete Schabarum has asked San Dimas Parks and Recreation Department staff members and officials from nearby cities to modify it in coming months, according to Ray Anderson, an aide to Schabarum.
REAL ESTATE
September 8, 1985
DeVere H. Anderson, founder-president of W & A Builders, has formed DeVere Anderson Enterprises, 15670 Ventura Blvd., Encino. His new development firm has three major projects under way: Park Shadows, a 272-unit development in Baldwin Park; a 1,685-home community in the Chino Hills area, and a master-planned development near Phoenix.
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