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Ray Anthony

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June 5, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Big-band leader and trumpeter Ray Anthony has put his home in the Hollywood Hills West area on the market at $5.2 million. Custom-built for Anthony in 1975, the 3,881-square-foot house contains a den, an office, a gym, two fireplaces, two bedrooms and three bathrooms. "We built it to take advantage of the tremendous views," he said of his hillside home, which sits on about a quarter-acre on a cul-de-sac. Anthony, who turned 90 this year, used the house for years to run a business selling big-band CDs. He plans to play at a belated celebration marking his birthday this month.
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BUSINESS
June 5, 2012 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Big-band leader and trumpeter Ray Anthony has put his home in the Hollywood Hills West area on the market at $5.2 million. Custom-built for Anthony in 1975, the 3,881-square-foot house contains a den, an office, a gym, two fireplaces, two bedrooms and three bathrooms. "We built it to take advantage of the tremendous views," he said of his hillside home, which sits on about a quarter-acre on a cul-de-sac. Anthony, who turned 90 this year, used the house for years to run a business selling big-band CDs. He plans to play at a belated celebration marking his birthday this month.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lest anyone think that concert-noise problems began in the rock era, consider the dreaded Bunny Hop: "3,000 people pounding on the floor at one time makes a pretty thunderous sound, besides what it can do to the structure of the building," says bandleader Ray Anthony, who popularized the hopping dance in the early '50s. "We were recently asked to do it in Santa Cruz, but we didn't dare.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1990 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lest anyone think that concert-noise problems began in the rock era, consider the dreaded Bunny Hop: "3,000 people pounding on the floor at one time makes a pretty thunderous sound, besides what it can do to the structure of the building," says bandleader Ray Anthony, who popularized the hopping dance in the early '50s. "We were recently asked to do it in Santa Cruz, but we didn't dare.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Susan King
Dennis Farina, who died Monday morning at the age of 69 of a blood clot in his lung, had two distinct careers. He was a veteran Chicago police officer until a chance meeting with director Michael Mann, who was in the Windy City to make his first feature film, 1981's "Thief," changed his career path. In a 2001 interview with the Los Angeles Times, Farina joked that he "blamed" Mann for turning him into an actor. The two had a mutual friend, a retired cop, who was a writer on "Thief.
NEWS
May 18, 1991
Kenneth James Trimble, 62, a trombonist and vocalist with the Lawrence Welk orchestra for 25 years. At 15, Trimble wanted a cornet that was priced at $8 in his local hock shop. But he only had $5, so settled for a $4 trombone and a $1 instruction book. He soon qualified for a Salvation Army band, spent World War II in a U.S. Army band, and then played with Johnny (Scat) Davis, Tex Beneke, Ray Anthony and his own Dixieland band before joining Welk. On May 8 in Reno of lymphoma.
NEWS
April 11, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Larry LaPrise, a club singer who wrote the classic dance ditty "The Hokey Pokey," has died. LaPrise, 83, died April 4. LaPrise was leading the Ram Trio at Sun Valley's Ram Bar when he concocted the group dance for the apres-ski crowd in the late 1940s. It gained national popularity in 1953 when bandleader Ray Anthony recorded it on the flip side of another novelty song, "The Bunny Hop." After his trio disbanded in the 1960s, LaPrise worked for the post office in Ketchum, Idaho.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2001
Joan Fry Flory, 71, who worked in the 1950s as a big band singer under the name Joan Durell. Born in Toronto, Flory was a runner-up Miss Canada in 1949. She sang with the orchestras of Art Mooney, Claude Thornhill and Ray Anthony and appeared at the first Monterey Jazz Festival in 1958. She married alto saxophonist and band leader Med Flory in 1952, and retired from performing in 1960, returning to the stage briefly in the '80s to lead a nine-piece band, Joanie and Her Nighthawks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2008 | Jason Song
An 18-year-old student was shot late Wednesday night after a basketball game between Westchester and Fairfax high schools, police said. Ray-Anthony Rolison, a Westchester senior, was wounded about 10 p.m. near West 80th Street and Loyola Boulevard near the gymnasium at Loyola Marymount University, said Mike Bowman, the Los Angeles Unified School District's deputy chief of police. Rolison was treated at UCLA Medical Center and released, said Lt. John Cook of the Los Angeles Police Department's Pacific Division.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2001
* Big Band--Pierce College Foundation will host a big band dance with Ray Anthony and his Orchestra on Feb. 2 at the Warner Center Marriott Hotel, 21850 Oxnard St., Woodland Hills. $18. (818) 704-9725. * Mystery Theater--Woodland Hills Community Theatre will open Agatha Christie's "Spider's Web" Feb. 2 at the West Valley Playhouse, 7242 Owensmouth Ave., Canoga Park. $18. (818) 884-1907. * Symphony Concert--The New Valley Symphony Orchestra will play Feb.
NEWS
June 8, 1999
Public funeral services for entertainer Mel Torme are scheduled at 11 a.m. today in the chapel of Westwood Village Memorial Park, 1218 Glendon Ave., with burial to follow. Although the chapel will be reserved for family and close friends, outside seating and loudspeakers will be provided for the public.
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