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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Ray Armando steps on stage Saturday at Chadney's in Burbank, he arrives steeped in jazz history. Armando was just 8 years old and living in Harlem when he started taking conga drum lessons from one of the acknowledged masters of the instrument, Cuban drummer Mongo Santamaria. "He lived across the street from me, and I used to see him all the time," said Armando, 56, a native New Yorker who now lives in Glendale. "When I asked him if he'd teach me, he asked me, 'Can you play a conga beat?'
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Ray Armando steps on stage Saturday at Chadney's in Burbank, he arrives steeped in jazz history. Armando was just 8 years old and living in Harlem when he started taking conga drum lessons from one of the acknowledged masters of the instrument, Cuban drummer Mongo Santamaria. "He lived across the street from me, and I used to see him all the time," said Armando, 56, a native New Yorker who now lives in Glendale. "When I asked him if he'd teach me, he asked me, 'Can you play a conga beat?'
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
The club with two names (Marla's Jazz Supper Club, Marla's Memory Lane) and two policies (jazz, comedy) blended its dual identity successfully over the weekend with the veteran trombonist Benny Powell supplying the music and a surprisingly transformed Reynaldo Rey furnishing the jokes. Powell, a Basie alumnus and later a Southland resident in the '70s, grew up in the shadow of J. J. Johnson, whose fluency and strong melodic sense he reflects.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1988 | A. JAMES LISKA
Sometimes there's just no winning. At Marla's Memory Lane on Friday night, Benard Ighner, the singer-songwriter, had in mind to premiere a few of his newest songs with a six-piece band that could swing as heartily as it could get down and boogie. The crowd, familiar with Ighner's classic composition, "Everything Must Change," and his stylish rendition of "My Funny Valentine"--ballads both--was all ears. Well, almost.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bill Cantos is an everything-but-the-kitchen-sink kind of singer. "I'm jazz meets pop meets Brazilian meets R & B, with a little gospel thrown in for good measure," he said. The approach has worked: He has recorded with the likes of singer Kevyn Lettau, bassist John Patitucci, saxophonist Justo Almario and scores of others. "I love to use my voice in different ways," said Cantos, 33.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the late '80s, after working healthy stints with such well- known jazzmen as Count Basie, Oscar Peterson and Ahmad Jamal, the decidedly talented bassist John Heard quit playing music. His goal was to focus full time on his career as a visual artist. Heard had been drawing since he was 6 or 7, had never stopped and had recently added sculpture to his repertoire. He took the move seriously, even loaning his bass to a youth in his native Pittsburgh, Pa.
NEWS
September 24, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
Pianist Arlette McCoy Budwig figures the day she hooked her husband, the great bassist Monty Budwig, was the day she gave him the sack. "It was 1970, our first time working together," Arlette Budwig recalled. "I had a casual job at the Daughters of the American Revolution Hall in Pasadena and had hired Monty. He had come over to the house and was playing while we waited for the drummer, Chuck Piscatello, to arrive.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1997 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tenor saxophonist Don Menza is acclaimed for delivering a lot of notes at breakneck speed. His most well-known recording, a solo on "Channel One Suite," was recorded with drummer Buddy Rich's big band in 1968, and it demonstrates just that sort of phenomenal technique. But that number starts with a slow, steamy ballad, showcasing another side of Menza. It is softer and more quietly passionate, a side that the 60-year-old says better reflects the real Don Menza.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1996 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Except for a brief period from 1945 to the early 1960s, jazz has never really thrived in Southern California. But there have been times when the music bloomed nicely, as in the '80s, when Donte's, the Baked Potato in North Hollywood and Carmelo's in Sherman Oaks were booking a grand assortment of both top flight local artists and name out-of-towners. 1996 in the Valley could be another of those times.
NEWS
October 21, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times
The Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra is holding forth on a recent Sunday at the Jazz Bakery in Cul ver City, and protean tenor saxophonist Charles Owens is featured on a slow, sultry blues number. The notes he plays are breathy and long, like gusts of warm autumn wind, and the feelings underpinning these tones swirl around you, warming you like a friend's arm wrapped over your shoulder. Though Owens also focuses on soprano saxophone and flute, he calls tenor sax his "bread and butter horn."
SPORTS
April 4, 1999
Brian Cortez's squeeze bunt drove in Danny Valencia in the top of the ninth inning to give Century a 2-1 victory over Covina Charter Oak in the first round of the Santa Ana Elks baseball tournament Saturday. Alex Gutierrez hit a home run in the seventh to tie the score, 1-1, for Century (6-6). In the ninth with one out and Valencia at third, Cortez bunted back to the pitcher, who threw high to the plate.
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