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Ray Art Studios

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999
Ray-Art Studios, an emerging entertainment production facility in the West Valley, just wrapped up its first feature film project. The studio, which opened two years ago in Canoga Park, had been specializing in renting sound stage space to TV productions, such as "The Love Boat" and "Nothing Sacred." But with the completion this month of "The Storytellers," a comedy about screenwriting, Ray-Art is venturing into new territory.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
Continuing a $10-million expansion at its west San Fernando Valley production facilities, Ray Art Studios opened a sixth sound stage Thursday. Ray Art specializes in renting sound stages for television productions but also hosts feature film productions. In addition, the studio is producing a series of its own productions for theatrical, cable and network release.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved a low-interest earthquake loan to Ray-Art Studios to repair and retrofit buildings that were damaged in the Northridge quake. Papazian-Hirsch Studios, LLC, operators of Ray-Art Studios, bought the property, formerly a shampoo factory, after the quake. The company is expected to receive a loan of up to $695,000 to retrofit the production facility to prevent damage in future quakes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2000
In addition to talking to four business leaders about prospects for Valley business as a whole this year, The Times asked 10 people at companies large and small to share their outlooks for their individual businesses. Here's what they told Maggie Barnett of our staff: * * Zachary Schuler President, Cal Net Northridge-based computer network design company In 2000 I would estimate revenues increasing 100%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Love Boat, which sails the tropical seas under fluffy clouds in its latest TV revival, in real life is docked on Variel Avenue in Canoga Park. And though the set for the TV series is not actually as massive as an ocean liner, it's still causing a space crunch, taking up four sound stages. That has Ray-Art Studios, the biggest in the West Valley, planning a $10-million expansion that will double its number of sound stages and add extra amenities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 2000
In addition to talking to four business leaders about prospects for Valley business as a whole this year, The Times asked 10 people at companies large and small to share their outlooks for their individual businesses. Here's what they told Maggie Barnett of our staff: * * Zachary Schuler President, Cal Net Northridge-based computer network design company In 2000 I would estimate revenues increasing 100%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2000 | ANDREW BLANKSTEIN
Continuing a $10-million expansion at its west San Fernando Valley production facilities, Ray Art Studios opened a sixth sound stage Thursday. Ray Art specializes in renting sound stages for television productions but also hosts feature film productions. In addition, the studio is producing a series of its own productions for theatrical, cable and network release.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 2000 | ELIZABETH JENSEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laura Schlessinger's new Paramount-distributed daytime television talk show is advertising for audiences to attend tapings, and her critics are eagerly answering the call. An e-mail message sent out by the group stopdrlaura.com lists the toll-free number, as posted on Schlessinger's Web site, to get "VIP tickets," and calls on advocates opposed to the talk-show host in the Los Angeles area to "get your own free tickets and pay a visit to the 'doctor' in person."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
A City Council panel approved a loan of as much as $695,000 for Ray-Art Studios, a movie production facility, for making earthquake repairs that may lead to a major expansion of the facility. The Community and Economic Development Committee, which approved the loan at a meeting Monday, sent it to the full council for final approval.
BUSINESS
September 10, 2001 | MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 177-foot barge, once the floating set and soul of the San Francisco-based "Nash Bridges" television show, is almost ready for its close-up. In L.A. After CBS canceled the long-running Don Johnson and Cheech Marin cop action-drama this summer, two of the show's executive producers bought the floating set for about a third of its $1.3-million cost and hauled it from Pier 39 in San Francisco to the waterfront of San Pedro.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1999
Ray-Art Studios, an emerging entertainment production facility in the West Valley, just wrapped up its first feature film project. The studio, which opened two years ago in Canoga Park, had been specializing in renting sound stage space to TV productions, such as "The Love Boat" and "Nothing Sacred." But with the completion this month of "The Storytellers," a comedy about screenwriting, Ray-Art is venturing into new territory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Love Boat, which sails the tropical seas under fluffy clouds in its latest TV revival, in real life is docked on Variel Avenue in Canoga Park. And though the set for the TV series is not actually as massive as an ocean liner, it's still causing a space crunch, taking up four sound stages. That has Ray-Art Studios, the biggest in the West Valley, planning a $10-million expansion that will double its number of sound stages and add extra amenities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1998 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
The Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday unanimously approved a low-interest earthquake loan to Ray-Art Studios to repair and retrofit buildings that were damaged in the Northridge quake. Papazian-Hirsch Studios, LLC, operators of Ray-Art Studios, bought the property, formerly a shampoo factory, after the quake. The company is expected to receive a loan of up to $695,000 to retrofit the production facility to prevent damage in future quakes.
BUSINESS
July 21, 1999 | MORRIS NEWMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A group of downtown developers is trying to achieve what many real estate professionals consider near impossible: putting downtown on the map of the entertainment industry. The developers, a group comprising Smith, Hricik and Munselle of Los Angeles, Hollywood Location Co. and Bristol Group Inc. of San Francisco, are opening six new sound stages this week on the campus of the former Unocal headquarters building at 5th and Bixel streets.
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