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Ray Boom Boom Mancini

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
A powerful story of triumph and tragedy - and the infamous moment that encapsulated both - gets a stirring workout in the colorful, absorbing documentary "The Good Son: The Life of Ray 'Boom Boom' Mancini," directed by Jesse James Miler, based on the book by Mark Kriegel. Early-1980s sports icon Ray Mancini grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, idolizing his father, 1940s' top-ranked lightweight contender Lenny "Boom Boom" Mancini, and devoted to his older brother, Lenny Jr., who also briefly boxed.
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SPORTS
October 15, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
The tall, handsome man entered the room slowly, but with head held high. He was once heavyweight boxing champion of the world. Now, he moved along behind a walker. Could it have been 1973, 37 years ago, that Ken Norton had broken Muhammad Ali's jaw and won his title? Could this be the same once-great athlete who had forced the state of Illinois to change its high school track and field entry rules because he had won all eight events he tried? The others swarmed to greet him. Men with limps, flat noses and faces of scar tissue rushed to pose for pictures with him, fists clenched in the traditional boxing poses.
SPORTS
October 15, 2010 | Bill Dwyre
The tall, handsome man entered the room slowly, but with head held high. He was once heavyweight boxing champion of the world. Now, he moved along behind a walker. Could it have been 1973, 37 years ago, that Ken Norton had broken Muhammad Ali's jaw and won his title? Could this be the same once-great athlete who had forced the state of Illinois to change its high school track and field entry rules because he had won all eight events he tried? The others swarmed to greet him. Men with limps, flat noses and faces of scar tissue rushed to pose for pictures with him, fists clenched in the traditional boxing poses.
SPORTS
March 6, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
This is a nostalgic time. The 50s, the 60s, the 70s, they're all in. How else to explain "The Brady Bunch Reunion," "The Wonder Years" or tonight's fight between former world champions Ray (Boom Boom) Mancini and Hector (Macho) Camacho. It's probably no fair to dump on this match, a once attractive fight that is only five years delayed. There is on the horizon similar plunderings of history, Sugar Ray Leonard and Tommy Hearns for example, a rematch that made sense about seven years ago.
SPORTS
February 9, 1992 | RICH TOSCHES
If you get a rush watching violent men with deadly serious intentions, boxing is what you're looking for. It's a sport in which a good practical joke generally consists of whacking an opponent below the belt and watching the look on his face. So what is Greg Haugen doing in this business? To see the former lightweight champion outside of the ring is to see a man locked in a state of perpetual humor.
SPORTS
March 7, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Except for the fun of booing villains and cheering All-American boys, there would seem to be little call for a rematch of Monday night's fight between Hector (Macho) Camacho and Ray (Boom Boom) Mancini. Certainly fights such as these have a cathartic value for the sports fan. But don't we already have big-time wrestling? Still, they were talking rematch after Camacho eked out a split decision over his hated rival, the milk-drinking Mancini, and with more wrestling than big-time presents at that.
SPORTS
April 4, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greg Haugen knocked Ray Mancini into retirement with a right to the jaw in the seventh round Friday night of a junior-welterweight bout before 5,967 at the Reno/Sparks Convention Center. Haugen, well ahead on points, caught Mancini flush on the left side of his jaw after Mancini had missed Haugen completely with a right. Mancini fell forward, his left arm wrapped around Haugen's head, before landing on the second rope. As he lay there, it appeared that referee Mills Lane would count him out.
SPORTS
April 3, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Mancini has had two fights since 1984 and lost them both. Yet tonight, he is matched with Greg Haugen in a pay-per-view boxing show for which he could earn $550,000. The reason has more to do with Mancini's appeal to Reno fight fans than anything at stake. Mancini is big box office here. His three previous Reno fights--and never mind that he won one of the three--grossed live gate totals of $2.2 million.
SPORTS
November 26, 1988 | Earl Gustkey
In the 1960s, when Roosevelt Grier was a member of the Rams' famed Fearsome Foursome defensive line, his National Football League opponents respectfully referred to him as a load. He still is. In April, 1986, Gov. George Deukmejian appointed Grier to the State Athletic Commission, the 8-member body that oversees professional boxing in California. Grier accepted the appointment, which carried with it the minimum responsibility of attending the monthly meetings.
SPORTS
April 4, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Greg Haugen knocked Ray Mancini into retirement with a right to the jaw in the seventh round Friday night of a junior-welterweight bout before 5,967 at the Reno/Sparks Convention Center. Haugen, well ahead on points, caught Mancini flush on the left side of his jaw after Mancini had missed Haugen completely with a right. Mancini fell forward, his left arm wrapped around Haugen's head, before landing on the second rope. As he lay there, it appeared that referee Mills Lane would count him out.
SPORTS
April 3, 1992 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Mancini has had two fights since 1984 and lost them both. Yet tonight, he is matched with Greg Haugen in a pay-per-view boxing show for which he could earn $550,000. The reason has more to do with Mancini's appeal to Reno fight fans than anything at stake. Mancini is big box office here. His three previous Reno fights--and never mind that he won one of the three--grossed live gate totals of $2.2 million.
SPORTS
February 9, 1992 | RICH TOSCHES
If you get a rush watching violent men with deadly serious intentions, boxing is what you're looking for. It's a sport in which a good practical joke generally consists of whacking an opponent below the belt and watching the look on his face. So what is Greg Haugen doing in this business? To see the former lightweight champion outside of the ring is to see a man locked in a state of perpetual humor.
SPORTS
March 7, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Except for the fun of booing villains and cheering All-American boys, there would seem to be little call for a rematch of Monday night's fight between Hector (Macho) Camacho and Ray (Boom Boom) Mancini. Certainly fights such as these have a cathartic value for the sports fan. But don't we already have big-time wrestling? Still, they were talking rematch after Camacho eked out a split decision over his hated rival, the milk-drinking Mancini, and with more wrestling than big-time presents at that.
SPORTS
March 6, 1989 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
This is a nostalgic time. The 50s, the 60s, the 70s, they're all in. How else to explain "The Brady Bunch Reunion," "The Wonder Years" or tonight's fight between former world champions Ray (Boom Boom) Mancini and Hector (Macho) Camacho. It's probably no fair to dump on this match, a once attractive fight that is only five years delayed. There is on the horizon similar plunderings of history, Sugar Ray Leonard and Tommy Hearns for example, a rematch that made sense about seven years ago.
SPORTS
November 26, 1988 | Earl Gustkey
In the 1960s, when Roosevelt Grier was a member of the Rams' famed Fearsome Foursome defensive line, his National Football League opponents respectfully referred to him as a load. He still is. In April, 1986, Gov. George Deukmejian appointed Grier to the State Athletic Commission, the 8-member body that oversees professional boxing in California. Grier accepted the appointment, which carried with it the minimum responsibility of attending the monthly meetings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
A powerful story of triumph and tragedy - and the infamous moment that encapsulated both - gets a stirring workout in the colorful, absorbing documentary "The Good Son: The Life of Ray 'Boom Boom' Mancini," directed by Jesse James Miler, based on the book by Mark Kriegel. Early-1980s sports icon Ray Mancini grew up in Youngstown, Ohio, idolizing his father, 1940s' top-ranked lightweight contender Lenny "Boom Boom" Mancini, and devoted to his older brother, Lenny Jr., who also briefly boxed.
SPORTS
February 6, 1986
Former World Boxing Assn. lightweight champion Ray (Boom Boom) Mancini of Youngstown, Ohio, is the winner of the second annual Farewell to Sports Award presented by the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Dapper Dan Club.
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