Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRay Boone
IN THE NEWS

Ray Boone

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Ray Boone, a two-time All Star and the patriarch of the first three-generation family in major league baseball, died Sunday in San Diego following a long illness. He was 81. "It's going to be a real sad week for our family," Boone's son, Bob, who played 19 seasons as a catcher for the Philadelphia Phillies, California Angels and Kansas City Royals, told Major League Baseball's website. "But we all have a pretty strong faith and know he's in the best place.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Ray Boone, a two-time All Star and the patriarch of the first three-generation family in major league baseball, died Sunday in San Diego following a long illness. He was 81. "It's going to be a real sad week for our family," Boone's son, Bob, who played 19 seasons as a catcher for the Philadelphia Phillies, California Angels and Kansas City Royals, told Major League Baseball's website. "But we all have a pretty strong faith and know he's in the best place.
Advertisement
SPORTS
March 26, 1992 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During Ray Boone's 13-year career in the major leagues, his peak salary was $32,500. If he were in his prime today, he would be earning about a hundred times that much. Under the circumstances, Boone, 68, who attended Hoover High in San Diego and lives in Alpine, Calif., might be tempted to say he was born too soon. His son, Bob, made a more handsome living in 19 major league seasons, and his grandson, Bret, is on the brink of a career that could make him a multimillionaire.
SPORTS
March 26, 2001 | ROSS NEWHAN
Much like the construction on their new ballpark, the Cincinnati Reds are a work in progress. They retain the ability to win the National League Central this year, but basically they remain in a small market mode, pointing toward the opening of the Great American Ballpark in 2003. New Manager Bob Boone understands the direction and considers it a vast improvement on his experience in Kansas City.
SPORTS
August 20, 1992 | Associated Press
Second baseman Bret Boone of the Seattle Mariners made major league history Wednesday night at Baltimore when he became part of the first three-generation family to play in the big leagues. Boone is the grandson of Ray Boone, who played in the majors from 1948-60, and son of Bob Boone, a major league catcher from 1972-90. Bret, 23, had one hit in four at-bats and scored two runs in the Mariners' 10-8 victory over the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | Chris Foster
A little bit of pressure is located in the program for the Villa Park baseball team. In it is the Boone bloodline, for all to see, especially for Matt Boone. A full-page ad, featuring the baseball cards of grandfather Ray Boone and father Bob Boone, as well as brothers Bret and Aaron. At the bottom, a blank card, with the words: "Is There a Card Waiting for You?" Some have a family tree, some have a sequoia.
SPORTS
February 9, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was the Dom Perignon on the shelf with $1.89 bottles of Andre. He was the Mercedes-Benz in the parking lot with rusted Ford Escorts. He was the Georgio Armani suit on the rack with K mart leisure suits. In an era when star catchers are as difficult to find as high-yielding passport savings accounts, there was Bob Boone. The catcher time forgot. Boone played the game until he was 42. He spent 19 years in the big leagues, catching a record 2,225 games.
SPORTS
April 12, 1990 | GARY KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bret Boone practiced daily with future Hall of Famers, slept overnight at the home of baseball's all-time hit leader in clothes drenched in World Series champagne, and rode shotgun in a parade through the streets of Philadelphia. Baseball is in his blood. Ever since Boone begrudgingly enrolled in college almost three years ago, the USC junior has focused on the day he could put his books aside and follow his grandfather and father into the major leagues.
SPORTS
March 26, 2001 | ROSS NEWHAN
Much like the construction on their new ballpark, the Cincinnati Reds are a work in progress. They retain the ability to win the National League Central this year, but basically they remain in a small market mode, pointing toward the opening of the Great American Ballpark in 2003. New Manager Bob Boone understands the direction and considers it a vast improvement on his experience in Kansas City.
NEWS
April 16, 1996 | Chris Foster
A little bit of pressure is located in the program for the Villa Park baseball team. In it is the Boone bloodline, for all to see, especially for Matt Boone. A full-page ad, featuring the baseball cards of grandfather Ray Boone and father Bob Boone, as well as brothers Bret and Aaron. At the bottom, a blank card, with the words: "Is There a Card Waiting for You?" Some have a family tree, some have a sequoia.
SPORTS
August 20, 1992 | Associated Press
Second baseman Bret Boone of the Seattle Mariners made major league history Wednesday night at Baltimore when he became part of the first three-generation family to play in the big leagues. Boone is the grandson of Ray Boone, who played in the majors from 1948-60, and son of Bob Boone, a major league catcher from 1972-90. Bret, 23, had one hit in four at-bats and scored two runs in the Mariners' 10-8 victory over the Baltimore Orioles.
SPORTS
March 26, 1992 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During Ray Boone's 13-year career in the major leagues, his peak salary was $32,500. If he were in his prime today, he would be earning about a hundred times that much. Under the circumstances, Boone, 68, who attended Hoover High in San Diego and lives in Alpine, Calif., might be tempted to say he was born too soon. His son, Bob, made a more handsome living in 19 major league seasons, and his grandson, Bret, is on the brink of a career that could make him a multimillionaire.
SPORTS
February 9, 1992 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was the Dom Perignon on the shelf with $1.89 bottles of Andre. He was the Mercedes-Benz in the parking lot with rusted Ford Escorts. He was the Georgio Armani suit on the rack with K mart leisure suits. In an era when star catchers are as difficult to find as high-yielding passport savings accounts, there was Bob Boone. The catcher time forgot. Boone played the game until he was 42. He spent 19 years in the big leagues, catching a record 2,225 games.
SPORTS
April 12, 1990 | GARY KLEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bret Boone practiced daily with future Hall of Famers, slept overnight at the home of baseball's all-time hit leader in clothes drenched in World Series champagne, and rode shotgun in a parade through the streets of Philadelphia. Baseball is in his blood. Ever since Boone begrudgingly enrolled in college almost three years ago, the USC junior has focused on the day he could put his books aside and follow his grandfather and father into the major leagues.
SPORTS
April 1, 1993 | Associated Press
Bret Boone will start the season with the Calgary Cannons instead of the Seattle Mariners. Boone was optioned to triple-A Calgary Wednesday as the Mariners made their final cuts. Boone hit .206, struck out 14 times and committed six errors in 22 spring games. New Mariner Manager Lou Piniella was critical of Boone's swing. The son of former major leaguer Bob Boone and grandson of ex-big leaguer Ray Boone came up to the Mariners from Calgary at the end of last season.
SPORTS
June 12, 1992 | MARTIN HENDERSON
Ed Nelson, Poway High School's assistant principal in charge of discipline, has been named its new athletic director. Nelson, 39, replaces John Self, who gave up the position to coach the football team.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|