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Ray Bradbury

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NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Patt Morrison
Ray, darlin'. That's what I called him. It was, he had told me, what an Irish cabbie had called him, back when Ray Bradbury was still rather a lad of a writer, albeit an acclaimed one, and had gone off to Ireland to work on the screenplay for the 1956 movie "Moby Dick. " The John Huston film starred Gregory Peck as the divinely mad Captain Ahab and Orson Welles in a harrowing cameo as the preacher, and the epic donnybrooks between Ray and Huston were probably just as cinematic as anything that ended up on film.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | Steve Chawkins
Mary Grace Canfield, a character actress best known as part of the daffy Ralph-and-Alf brother-sister carpenter team on the TV comedy "Green Acres," died Saturday in a Santa Barbara hospice. She was 89. The cause was lung cancer, her daughter Phoebe Alexiades said. On "Green Acres," Canfield was Ralph Monroe, who, with her brother Alf, was perennially working on the bedroom of a city slicker couple (Eddie Albert and Eva Gabor) at their newly acquired farm near Hooterville. She was a down-home gal in bib overalls and a white painter's cap worn backward, a funny, plain-spoken woman doing "man's work" before feminism made the term quaint.
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NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Paul Thornton
After an important cultural icon dies, it isn't unusual for a handful of readers to reflect on how the recently deceased's work touched their lives. Author Ray Bradbury, who passed away last week, was no exception. Of the 42 (and counting) submissions sent to letters@latimes.com, several readers credited Bradbury's work for stoking their own imaginations and inspiring them to pursue careers in a number of creative fields. But the preponderance of submissions responding to Bradbury's death -- which are still trickling in, a week after the author passed June 5 -- have a personal dimension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2013 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
In one of writer Richard Matheson's last novels, when a radio psychologist complains that the woman his wife had just turned away from their door was "terribly disturbed," his wife retorts, "Aren't we all?" That question was central in Matheson's imagination, where the line between normal and out of this world was frighteningly fine. His stories and novels - including "I Am Legend" and "The Shrinking Man" - take place in the so-called real world, but the inexplicable abounds. The dark space under a couch is a passageway to an alien realm, a truck on a lonely road is possessed by evil, a telephone rings with a dead man's voice.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Ray Bradbury, who died Tuesday at age 91, had his share of novels adapted for the big screen (most notably "Farenheit 451" in 1966 and "Something Wicked This Way Comes" in 1983), but Bradbury's great strength was the short story, and the format best suited to showcase those works was the anthology TV series. Although Bradbury had been publishing stories since 1941, his first adaptation came 10 years later in an episode of the NBC horror-suspense anthology series, "Lights Out. " "Zero Hour" was a story of children aiding and abetting in an alien invasion of Earth.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2012 | By Nick Owchar, Los Angeles Times
If there's simply not enough time to read Ray Bradbury's entire body of work (even if you don't have a fireman with a flamethrower banging on your door), why not zero in on some of the books that stunned audiences and laid the foundation of his fame? Here are a few suggestions: "The Martian Chronicles" (1950): Bradbury was a young, hungry writer with stories appearing in various magazines when he published this novelistically arranged collection of stories. The red planet fascinated Bradbury, but this book isn't a fantasy in the same fashion as Edgar Rice Burroughs' adventures of John Carter.
NEWS
June 6, 2012 | By Morgan Little, This post has been updated, as indicated below.
WASHINGTON - President Obama paid tribute to the memory of science fiction writer Ray Bradbury Wednesday after the renowned author died at the age of 91. Citing Bradbury's “gift for storytelling” that “reshaped our culture and expanded our world,” Obama praised the author of 11 novels and 600 short stories, for understanding “that our imaginations could be used as a tool for better understanding, a vehicle for change and an expression of...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2012
An excerpt from Ray Bradbury's novel "Fahrenheit 451," copyright © 1953, renewed 1981 by Ray Bradbury. The passage describes Montag and the other firefighters hunting down books and burning them. Have reason to suspect attack; 11 No. Elm, City. E.B. "That would be Mrs. Blake, my neighbor," said the woman, reading the initials. "All right, men, let's get them!" Next thing they were up in musty blackness swinging silver hatchets at doors that were, after all, unlocked, tumbling through like boys all rollick and shout.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2012 | By David Ng
Ray Bradbury, who died on Tuesday at 91, will be remembered foremost as a science-fiction novelist and short-story writer whose works "Fahrenheit 451" and "The Martian Chronicles" have transcended the genre to become literary classics. But Bradbury was also an enthusiastic playwright, making significant detours to the stage and bringing his futuristic sensibility to live audiences. In Southern California, where he lived for most of his life, Bradbury was an active and familiar presence in the theater scene, adapting some of his popular fiction for the local stage while also penning original theatrical creations.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Mars Curiosity landing site will now be called Bradbury Landing in honor of science fiction writer Ray Bradbury, NASA announced Wednesday. The naming was part of a NASA briefing about the Curiosity Rover's progress. Curiosity's Twitter feed shared the news with a photo, saying: "In tribute, I dedicate my landing spot on Mars to you, Ray Bradbury. Greetings from Bradbury Landing!" Although Curiosity successfully landed on Mars on Aug. 6, NASA officials waited to announce the name of the site.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Iconic science-fiction author Ray Bradbury lived in Los Angeles for almost 80 years, but his books are heading back to his birthplace, Waukegan, Ill. His personal book collection will go the Waukegan Public Library. Bradbury lived in Waukegan until he was 13, when his family moved away. Throughout his writing career, he returned to that Midwestern youth, from 1957's "Dandelion Wine" to "Something Wicked this Way Comes" in 1962 and his last novel, 2006's "Farewell Summer. " After his death last year at age 91, Illinois officials learned that the author had left his personal book collection to the Waukegan library on County Street.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
The intersection of 5th and Flower streets in downtown Los Angeles was designated Ray Bradbury Square by city officials Thursday. But a better description might be "the intersection of imagination and inspiration," author and producer Steven Paul Leiva told fans of the noted writer who died in June at age 91. The location, near the front entrance to the Central Library, is a fitting place to honor the author of "The Illustrated Man" and "The...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2012 | By David Pagel
“For the Martian Chronicles,” at L&M Arts, pays homage to Ray Bradbury, who wrote much of his fantastic tale in his clapboard home that once stood at the gallery's address. Organized by Yael Lipschutz, archivist of the Noah Purifoy Foundation, the 30-artist exhibition is a whimsical mishmash of media, methods and styles. It keeps visitors on their toes, thinking quickly to discover connections among objects and images with not much in common except for their love of wide-eyed possibility.
NEWS
October 30, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
Lake Tahoe ski resorts reported more than 3 feet of fresh powder last week, with several chairlifts opening early (the majority of the resorts are slated to open in mid-November). Best deal: the $299 Ski Lake Tahoe Six-Pack Lift Ticket offers six days of skiing/snowboarding at all seven Ski Lake Tahoe resorts. The lift tickets are completely transferable (friends, family or complete strangers can use them) and they do not have to be used on consecutive days. Details, click here . . . . Mammoth, meanwhile, reports more than a foot of snow from the storm, with temps cold enough that the snow guns are going at night.  Opening slated for Nov. 8 . . . . Might be the best Halloween San Francisco has ever seen.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 2012
  The FBI gave Ray Bradbury a mixed review. According to documents declassified recently through the Freedom of Information Act, the bureau investigated the "Fahrenheit 451" author in the 1950s and 1960s because of suspected communist sympathies. One informant warned agents that Bradbury, who died June 5 at age 91, wrote stories that were "definitely slanted" against capitalism. The informant added that science fiction itself could so terrify readers that they would succumb to "incompetence bordering on hysteria" and would be helpless during a third world war. The bureau noted Bradbury's opposition to Sen. Joe McCarthy and other anti-communists and his support for civil rights.
SCIENCE
August 22, 2012 | By Amina Khan
After two weeks of taking stock of its surroundings, the Mars Curiosity rover has taken its first "baby steps" and sent back images of its first tracks, NASA officials said Wednesday. Engineers sent the commands Tuesday night for this first drive, which took about 16 minutes -- mostly spent taking pictures, said lead rover driver Matt Heverly. During the test, the rover moved forward about 4½ meters, turned 120 degrees in place and then backed up 2½ meters -- ending up about 6 meters, or roughly 20 feet, from its landing spot.
OPINION
August 27, 2011
Hollywood money Re " Mayor meets Hollywood ," Business, Aug. 25 Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa did not need to meet with film executives to solicit ideas on how to make Los Angeles a more film-friendly city. The answer is quite simple: Villaraigosa should do everything in his power to assure that Los Angeles is the most inexpensive city in the nation to film in. Not only would this bring back thousands of outsourced entertainment jobs to Los Angeles, but it would also secure the support of Hollywood in a future bid for the governorship.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Iconic science-fiction author Ray Bradbury lived in Los Angeles for almost 80 years, but his books are heading back to his birthplace, Waukegan, Ill. His personal book collection will go the Waukegan Public Library. Bradbury lived in Waukegan until he was 13, when his family moved away. Throughout his writing career, he returned to that Midwestern youth, from 1957's "Dandelion Wine" to "Something Wicked this Way Comes" in 1962 and his last novel, 2006's "Farewell Summer. " After his death last year at age 91, Illinois officials learned that the author had left his personal book collection to the Waukegan library on County Street.
NEWS
August 22, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
The Mars Curiosity landing site will now be called Bradbury Landing in honor of science fiction writer Ray Bradbury, NASA announced Wednesday. The naming was part of a NASA briefing about the Curiosity Rover's progress. Curiosity's Twitter feed shared the news with a photo, saying: "In tribute, I dedicate my landing spot on Mars to you, Ray Bradbury. Greetings from Bradbury Landing!" Although Curiosity successfully landed on Mars on Aug. 6, NASA officials waited to announce the name of the site.
NEWS
June 12, 2012 | By Paul Thornton
After an important cultural icon dies, it isn't unusual for a handful of readers to reflect on how the recently deceased's work touched their lives. Author Ray Bradbury, who passed away last week, was no exception. Of the 42 (and counting) submissions sent to letters@latimes.com, several readers credited Bradbury's work for stoking their own imaginations and inspiring them to pursue careers in a number of creative fields. But the preponderance of submissions responding to Bradbury's death -- which are still trickling in, a week after the author passed June 5 -- have a personal dimension.
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