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Ray Browning

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SPORTS
August 5, 1987 | PETE THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
Many serious athletes discover at some point in their careers that things aren't going as well as they should. When that happens, they sometimes seek advice from specialists. Ray Browning, a rookie triathlete with limited but impressive credentials, has no such need. When he needs some answers, he uses his own knowledge, or information available to him in the labs and libraries at UCLA. The 25-year-old mechanical engineering graduate is currently working on his Ph.D.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Ray Browne, 87, a professor at Ohio's Bowling Green University who was widely credited with coining the term "popular culture" and pioneering the study of such things as bumper stickers and cartoons, died Thursday at his home, his family said. The cause was congestive heart failure. Browne wrote and edited more than 70 books on popular culture -- including "The Guide to United States Popular Culture," published in 2001. Although many in the field credit Browne with coming up with the name "popular culture," no one could say for sure whether he originated it. "He was really going against the grain," said Robert Thompson, director of the Center for Television and Popular Culture at Syracuse University.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"We have a new piano player," was Ray Brown's first comment from the stage of Catalina Bar & Grill Tuesday night. "And we think he's doing a helluva job!" It was both instant acknowledgment and high praise from the veteran bassist for the arrival of Geoff Keezer in the Ray Brown Trio.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 26, 2009
David C. Kohler Attorney, law school professor David C. Kohler, 56, director of the entertainment and media law institute at Southwestern Law School, died of cancer Oct. 15 at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center in Los Angeles, the law school announced. Kohler, who also was a law professor, came to the institute in 2003 after more than 25 years as a media attorney, including nearly a decade with TBS and CNN. He joined Turner Broadcasting System in 1991 and served as assistant vice president and deputy general counsel.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
"We really appreciate your coming out in this weather," said Ray Brown--and thereupon launched his trio into a stomping treatment of "You Are My Sunshine." It is possible for any group to exceed, in overall achievement, the already considerable sum of its parts, particularly when those parts are Brown, Gene Harris and Jeff Hamilton. Such was the conclusion swiftly reached when this group, which plays together only occasionally, opened for a week at Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Ray Brown Master Class for Young Jazz Pianists is in session this week at Catalina Bar & Grill. "Ray Brown?" you might ask. "Isn't he a bass player?" And the answer is, "Yes. And who spends more time working alongside pianists than bassists?" And who could be more knowledgeable about good jazz piano playing than an artist who has performed with Bud Powell, Duke Ellington and Gene Harris and spent a substantial portion of his career in a fruitful alliance with Oscar Peterson?
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1995 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Drummer Jeff Hamilton, who has been a steady member of ensembles led by Ray Brown since 1978, leaves the bassist's trio on Sunday, at the conclusion of the band's six-night stand at Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood. "I felt it was time to embark on musical ideas of my own," said Hamilton, before Tuesday's rousing first set with Brown and pianist Benny Green at Catalina's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2002 | From Associated Press
Ray Brown, a legendary jazz bassist who played with giants such as Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, died Tuesday at 75. Brown died in his sleep in Indianapolis where he was concluding the U.S. leg of a tour, said John Clayton, a friend and fellow bassist. Brown had played golf earlier in the day and went to take an afternoon nap, Clayton said. When he did not show up to perform, a bandmate went to his hotel where his body was found in his room.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Although Joe Pass and Ray Brown have similar backgrounds, they had never worked together simply as a duo until Thursday night, when they began a three-night stint at the Loa. A capacity crowd braved the rain to witness this unprecedented event. Pass opened the show alone, playing his guitar mostly finger style, holding the pick in his mouth and assuming the body-all-aching-and-wracked-with-pain expression that traditionally accompanies (and belies) his performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1992 | LEONARD FEATHER
Ray Brown, the peripatetic bassist, has another brand-new affiliation. At Catalina on Tuesday he introduced his latest trio, featuring the fast-rising pianist Benny Green. Unlike Brown's previous associate Gene Harris, Green is not primarily a blues master. He is, however, a musician of rare adaptability. One of his talents is the ability to spin out long improvisational lines with both hands running parallel, in octave unison. Few jazz pianists have mastered this technique.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 2002 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Ray Brown last performed at Catalina Bar & Grill in February. But there was an almost palpable sense of his presence at the club on Tuesday, when the Killer Trio All Stars Plus One opened a weeklong tribute to the great bassist, who died in July. Guitarist Russell Malone, pianist Monty Alexander, bassist John Clayton and drummer Jeff Hamilton were logical choices for the musical salute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2002
Funeral services for jazz bassist Ray Brown, who died July 2 at the age of 75, will be held Tuesday at 3 p.m. at Forest Lawn, Hollywood Hills. In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that donations be made to the Ray Brown Music Scholarship Fund, c/o David L. Abell, 8162 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90048.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ray Brown's last appearance in the Southland took place a month and a half ago. Leading his trio in the opening set of one of his annual appearances at Catalina Bar & Grill, he again accomplished one of the feats of musical magic that characterized his long and productive career. When the young members of his group seemed to have difficulty finding contact with the heart of the music, instead emphasizing harmonic coloration and fast-paced technical virtuosity, Brown took charge.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2002 | Don Heckman
Ray Brown recorded over such a long period of time, in so many settings, that there are literally dozens of recordings that could be included in any selective list of his most attractive musical efforts. Obviously, it's worth checking out any of his numerous recordings with Oscar Peterson. In addition, here are a few personal favorites spanning much of his productive career: * "The Poll Winners" (Contemporary).
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2002 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Brown, who expanded the boundaries of the upright bass during a career in jazz spanning more than five decades, has died. He was 75. According to bassist John Clayton, a onetime student of Brown's and a longtime friend, Brown had played golf Tuesday morning in Indianapolis in sweltering heat. Brown returned to his hotel room in the early afternoon to rest before his scheduled appearance that night with his trio at a local club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2002 | From Associated Press
Ray Brown, a legendary jazz bassist who played with giants such as Dizzy Gillespie and Charlie Parker, died Tuesday at 75. Brown died in his sleep in Indianapolis where he was concluding the U.S. leg of a tour, said John Clayton, a friend and fellow bassist. Brown had played golf earlier in the day and went to take an afternoon nap, Clayton said. When he did not show up to perform, a bandmate went to his hotel where his body was found in his room.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Oscar Peterson, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Milt Jackson, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald--those are just six of the jazz giants with whom bassist Ray Brown has performed during a close-to-50-year career that can only be called extraordinary. Brown will be honored with the Los Angeles Jazz Society's annual tribute award at the society's dinner and awards concert, on Sunday at the Biltmore Hotel's Biltmore Bowl.
NEWS
May 23, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It took a while for the Ray Brown Trio to get fully up to speed Tuesday night at Catalina Bar & Grill. The veteran bassist, whose trios have been the incubators for young pianists ranging from Benny Green and Geoff Keezer to the current incumbent, Larry Fuller, was as charming and gregarious as ever, and the music typically ranged from standards to briskly boppish lines.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Ray Brown Master Class for Young Jazz Pianists is in session this week at Catalina Bar & Grill. "Ray Brown?" you might ask. "Isn't he a bass player?" And the answer is, "Yes. And who spends more time working alongside pianists than bassists?" And who could be more knowledgeable about good jazz piano playing than an artist who has performed with Bud Powell, Duke Ellington and Gene Harris and spent a substantial portion of his career in a fruitful alliance with Oscar Peterson?
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