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Ray Cammack Shows

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1996
Setting a revenue record, the Orange County Fair posted the second-highest turnout in its 104-year history, officials said Monday. "We're very happy with this year's fair," spokeswoman Lynn Howe said. "Although the total attendance was down" from 1995, she said, "there were no major incidents or accidents." Fair officials report that a total of 686,428 attended this year's 17-day event, which ended Sunday night. That was down 12,548 from last year's attendance.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2001 | DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County Fair officials say they received $1,500 in counterfeit money last week, prompting officials to begin training employees to spot fake bills. Becky Bailey-Findley, the fair's general manager, said fair vendors took in five counterfeit $100 bills over the fair's July 13-15 opening weekend and 10 more Thursday night. The bills were passed at the Ray Cammack Shows carnival and various food booths. Bailey-Findley said the bogus bills were used to pay for items of small value.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1995 | TOM RAGAN
Carnival operator Ray Cammack Shows Inc. was selected earlier this week to provide rides and games at the Orange County Fair under a three-year contract. On Monday, the Fair Board decided to award the bid to the Laveen, Ariz.-based company, but the decision will not be final until the board of directors officially approves the contract at its Feb. 23 board meeting, said Jill Lloyd, a spokeswoman for the fairgrounds. For the past decade, the Yuma, Ariz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1994 | HOLLY J. WAGNER
Orange County Fair officials said they will start all over again in their efforts to negotiate a contract with a carnival operator for the next three annual fairs. The fair board initially planned to award the three-year carnival contract to Ray Cammack Shows of Laveen, Ariz., which has worked with the Los Angeles County Fair for many years. But B&B Amusements of Yuma, Ariz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 1994 | HOLLY J. WAGNER and DIANE SEO
Orange County Fair officials have plans to finalize a three-year contract with a new carnival operator to provide rides at the fair through 1997, but a protest by the company that has provided rides for the past 10 years may stall the deal. The prospective operator, Ray Cammack Shows of Laveen, Ariz., has operated the midway for the Los Angeles County Fair for 10 years. It would replace B&B Amusements, which held the contract in Orange County for a decade and is protesting the decision.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 2005 | Lomi Kriel, Times Staff Writer
A registered child-sex offender was caught working at the Orange County Fair this week, revealing a flaw in its screening process and prompting an immediate check of all part-time employees, officials said Friday. Steven Henry Torres, 44, of Anaheim was arrested Tuesday for violating his probation, said Orange County Fair spokeswoman Lisa MacDonald. He was sentenced Friday to three years in state prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 2006 | Hemmy So, Times Staff Writer
Attendance at the Orange County Fair this summer dropped nearly 13% from the previous year, a slide that officials attribute to soaring temperatures and high gas prices. Revenue also plummeted, with parking and general admission declining 12% and concession sales sinking 11%. Still, the 21-day fair, which ended Sunday, attracted its third-highest attendance in its history, 924,315 people. The fair's attendance record was set last year at 1,058,192.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 2003 | Lynne Barnes, Times Staff Writer
Barbara Boester remembers a time at the Ventura County Fair, when all she had to worry about was minding her 8-month-old daughter while volunteering in the youth building. That was 30 years ago. Today, Boester has a few more concerns. This year, the 54-year-old Ventura resident, now the fair's deputy manager, was responsible for rounding up carnival rides and midway games.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 2005 | Lomi Kriel, Times Staff Writer
For three weeks each summer, the Orange County Fairgrounds are transformed into a cornucopia of food, music, arcades and thrill rides. On Monday, the hard work of turning it all back into a huge parking lot was well underway. Barely a dozen hours after the fair in Costa Mesa closed Sunday, the sounds of children were replaced by the noises of power tools and trucks. The normally neat midway was strewn with paper cups and water bottles -- the flotsam of hurried work crews.
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