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Ray Castellani

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990
After reading the article on Ray Castellani ("Skid Row Volunteer's Gloom Turns to Joy as Help Pours In," Metro, Feb. 17), I too was amazed, but also saddened. Trucks, old and new, camper shells, gasoline, coffee, special requests from a mayor, job offers--all very amazing. What saddened me is how helpful we all can be only when we want to. Would there have been an "outpouring of help" to the Skid Row area if Castellani's truck hadn't been stolen? I doubt it. The story itself shows the potential people, government and companies have in (providing)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without fanfare, Ray Castellani's Frontline Foundation will deliver meal number 500,000 today to the homeless of Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles. The milestone represents the power of human caring and volunteerism, Castellani said Wednesday. "It's not just the food," said the 63-year-old former Skid Row resident, whose nonprofit food kitchen is based in Van Nuys. "It's the understanding, the compassion."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1991
I was thrilled to see public awareness brought to Ray Castellani, Noreen Goldner and the Frontline Foundation. I have volunteered for Frontline for almost two years. This quiet little group has done so much. Castellani has one focus, and that is to end hunger on Skid Row. He doesn't try to change anybody, rehabilitate anyone or save those he serves. He just wants to see their stomachs filled. I would like to comment on a few points the missions stated--that litter is left behind after our servings and that problems arise because of the Frontline Foundation food line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1995 | SUE REILLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Former actor, drunk and Skid Row denizen Ray Castellani leaves tomorrow for Washington, D.C., and a meeting Thursday with President Clinton in the White House Rose Garden. Castellani will be one of 18 Americans honored with a Presidential Service Award during National Volunteer Week. Castellani, a 61-year-old resident of Tarzana, is the founder and driving force behind the San Fernando Valley-based Frontline Foundation, begun in 1987 to feed men and women on Skid Row.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 1996 | EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without fanfare, Ray Castellani's Frontline Foundation will deliver meal number 500,000 today to the homeless of Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles. The milestone represents the power of human caring and volunteerism, Castellani said Wednesday. "It's not just the food," said the 63-year-old former Skid Row resident, whose nonprofit food kitchen is based in Van Nuys. "It's the understanding, the compassion."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the past two years, Ray Castellani's white pickup truck had become a fixture of sorts on the ever-changing, hopeless streets of Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles. Three times each week he parked the truck at the corner of 5th and San Pedro streets and used the pickup's tailgate as a makeshift sandwich bar from which he fed hundreds of the homeless men and women who call him "Papa." But no more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Touched by the story of Ray Castellani, the man whose efforts to feed the homeless were jeopardized when his truck was stolen this week, a radio station Friday presented him with a brand new pickup and others offered everything from imported gourmet coffees to free gasoline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1995 | SUE REILLY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Former actor, drunk and Skid Row denizen Ray Castellani leaves tomorrow for Washington, D.C., and a meeting Thursday with President Clinton in the White House Rose Garden. Castellani will be one of 18 Americans honored with a Presidential Service Award during National Volunteer Week. Castellani, a 61-year-old resident of Tarzana, is the founder and driving force behind the San Fernando Valley-based Frontline Foundation, begun in 1987 to feed men and women on Skid Row.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Castellani's pickup trucks pulled up with their cargoes of free food at 5th and San Pedro streets, the guts of Skid Row. And commotion followed. Dozens of street people swarmed a young woman volunteer handing out meal tickets. Cursing, scuffling, laughing, they struggled for the tickets, pushing the woman against one of the two trucks. It looked as if someone might get hurt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the one thing Ray Castellani hoped never to say to the Skid Row bums he calls brothers: Goodby. But after five years of feeding the forlorn and the forgotten, serving love with every egg salad sandwich, Castellani's Frontline Foundation is out of money and Castellani is damn near out of hope. "I feel, I feel alone," said Castellani, himself a recovered alcoholic whose drinking and bad luck has landed him on Skid Row more than once in his 60 years. "I'm tired."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is the one thing Ray Castellani hoped never to say to the Skid Row bums he calls brothers: Goodby. But after five years of feeding the forlorn and the forgotten, serving love with every egg salad sandwich, Castellani's Frontline Foundation is out of money and Castellani is damn near out of hope. "I feel, I feel alone," said Castellani, himself a recovered alcoholic whose drinking and bad luck has landed him on Skid Row more than once in his 60 years. "I'm tired."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1991
I was thrilled to see public awareness brought to Ray Castellani, Noreen Goldner and the Frontline Foundation. I have volunteered for Frontline for almost two years. This quiet little group has done so much. Castellani has one focus, and that is to end hunger on Skid Row. He doesn't try to change anybody, rehabilitate anyone or save those he serves. He just wants to see their stomachs filled. I would like to comment on a few points the missions stated--that litter is left behind after our servings and that problems arise because of the Frontline Foundation food line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1991 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Castellani's pickup trucks pulled up with their cargoes of free food at 5th and San Pedro streets, the guts of Skid Row. And commotion followed. Dozens of street people swarmed a young woman volunteer handing out meal tickets. Cursing, scuffling, laughing, they struggled for the tickets, pushing the woman against one of the two trucks. It looked as if someone might get hurt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1990
After reading the article on Ray Castellani ("Skid Row Volunteer's Gloom Turns to Joy as Help Pours In," Metro, Feb. 17), I too was amazed, but also saddened. Trucks, old and new, camper shells, gasoline, coffee, special requests from a mayor, job offers--all very amazing. What saddened me is how helpful we all can be only when we want to. Would there have been an "outpouring of help" to the Skid Row area if Castellani's truck hadn't been stolen? I doubt it. The story itself shows the potential people, government and companies have in (providing)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Touched by the story of Ray Castellani, the man whose efforts to feed the homeless were jeopardized when his truck was stolen this week, a radio station Friday presented him with a brand new pickup and others offered everything from imported gourmet coffees to free gasoline.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1990 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During the past two years, Ray Castellani's white pickup truck had become a fixture of sorts on the ever-changing, hopeless streets of Skid Row in downtown Los Angeles. Three times each week he parked the truck at the corner of 5th and San Pedro streets and used the pickup's tailgate as a makeshift sandwich bar from which he fed hundreds of the homeless men and women who call him "Papa." But no more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1994 | TERESA ANN WILLIS
Nearly a year ago, Ray Castellani was ready to call it quits. The former actor's nonprofit mobile soup kitchen, called the Frontline Foundation, had nearly run out of money and Castellani was forced to cut paid staff. But help from celebrities such as Linda Bloodworth-Thomason, producer of the television show "Designing Women," contributions from schools and businesses and a $1,400 anonymous gift kept the organization alive.
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