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February 22, 2009 | David Ritz, Ritz has collaborated on the autobiographies of, among others, Ray Charles, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin and B.B. King.
In summer 1957, I was a teenager who had just moved to Texas from the East Coast. One Sunday afternoon, I happened to walk into a large social hall in South Dallas where a jam session was underway. On the bandstand were three saxophonists: Leroy "Hog" Cooper on baritone, David "Fathead" Newman on tenor and Hank Crawford on alto. Their playing shook me to my very core. Through their horns, they shouted out a blues with the ferocity of a Blind Lemon Jefferson or a Bessie Smith.
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September 6, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's salute to Chuck Berry as the 2012 honoree for its "American Masters" series will be capped with a multi-artist concert featuring Ernie Isley of the Isley Brothers, Darryl McDaniels of Run DMC, New York Dolls singer David Johansen, roots-rock singer-songwriter-guitarist Rosie Flores, Motorhead front man Lemmy Kilmister, guitarist Joe Bonamassa, Oklahoma singer-songwriter John Fullbright and several others, including Berry...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Hank Crawford, the bluesy alto saxophonist who was a mainstay of Ray Charles' band in the late 1950s and early '60s, has died. He was 74. Crawford, who also wrote arrangements for Charles and served as his musical director before forging his own career as a band leader, died Jan. 29 at his home in Memphis, Tenn. His sister, Delores, told the Commercial Appeal newspaper that Crawford had been in declining health for much of the past year with complications from a stroke in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2012 | By Richard S. Ginell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
There were two questions on the table Wednesday night at the Hollywood Bowl's "Genius + Soul = Jazz" tribute to the late, protean, one-of-a-kind Ray Charles. How can you do justice to the bewildering collection of idioms that Charles fused? And how can you do this without Ray? The Bowl found a way. Co-producers Gregg Field and Phil Ramone fielded not one but three distinct musical outfits - a 10-piece jazz band loaded with heavy hitters, a small string orchestra backed with a chorus of young singers, and the entire Count Basie Orchestra - performing separately or mashed together.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2005 | From a Times staff writer
Representatives of the estate of the late Ray Charles say a Ray Charles Museum Foundation has been established and plan to build a museum on the site of his famous Los Angeles recording studios on Washington Boulevard near Western Avenue. Architectural plans, to be publicly unveiled Thursday, call for the existing building to be expanded to about 20,000 square feet, nearly three times its current size. The museum would feature exhibits and artifacts from Charles' storied career.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 2004 | Geoff Boucher
A public memorial service for the late Ray Charles has been scheduled for noon Thursday. The 73-year-old singer, who died last Thursday, will lie in repose until 8 p.m. at the South Hall of the Los Angeles Convention Center, which is adjacent to Staples Center downtown. A private funeral is scheduled for Friday at the First AME Church with Stevie Wonder, Willie Nelson and B.B. King among the expected program participants.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2003 | From Associated Press
Acute hip discomfort has forced Ray Charles to postpone upcoming concert dates, his publicist said. Charles, 72, has had cartilage problems around the joint and is undergoing treatment in Los Angeles, spokesman Jerry Digney said. The postponements affect 14 concerts, starting with a scheduled appearance tonight in Worcester, Mass., Digney said. Charles expects to resume his national tour Aug. 22 at Harrah's Casino in Escondido.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Times Staff Writer
You need only hear a note or two of one of his vocals to recognize Ray Charles. Like the late Louis Armstrong, he's an artist who so dominates his form that he displaces everyone around him. He's instant public domain, which is as good a reason as any for his being honored in Friday's telecast of the Kennedy Center Awards (others on the list are Hume Cronyn, Jessica Tandy, Yehudi Menuhin, Antony Tudor and Lucille Ball). It airs at 9 p.m. Friday on CBS.
NEWS
February 14, 1992
The County of Los Angeles Public Library and Supervisor Kenneth Hahn will honor singer Ray Charles at the 13th Annual Black History Tribute Saturday at 11 a.m. at the A. C. Bilbrew Library, 150 El Segundo Blvd. The event is free and open to the public. Information: (213) 538-3350.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2007 | From a Times staff writer
The producers who brought Ray Charles' biography to movie screens three years ago are now doing the same for theater. "Ray Charles Live! -- A New Musical" will round out the Pasadena Playhouse's 2007 season. Set during the singer's last live recording session, the play features a book by Suzan-Lori Parks ("Topdog/Underdog") interwoven with such signature Charles hits as "Georgia on My Mind."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2012 | By Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times
There are hundreds of spirited musical tales in "When I Left Home," Buddy Guy's new autobiography, which offers a colorful account of his 50-year-long tenure as perhaps the most influential guitar slinger in Chicago blues. One of the best comes when the young Guy, having recently headed north from Louisiana in the late 1950s to make his fortune, meets Muddy Waters, the reigning pasha of Chicago's blues scene, sitting in a red Chevy wagon parked behind a club, eating cold cuts. "His dark skin had a glow," Guy recalls.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2011 | Times staff and wire reports
Dobie Gray, a smooth balladeer and soul singer who scored his biggest hit in the early 1970s with "Drift Away," has died. He was 71. Gray, who had cancer, died Tuesday at his Nashville home, said Charlie Andrews, his attorney. Before he adopted the name of Dobie Gray — a nod to sitcom character Dobie Gillis — the singer recorded under other names before breaking through with 1965's "The 'In' Crowd," which became a top 20 hit. He also had success that year with "See You at the Go-Go.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2010
'Judge Judy' tops 'Oprah' "Judge Judy" won a ratings verdict over "Oprah" last season to rank No. 1 among daytime series. According to Nielsen figures, Judy Sheindlin's courtroom show averaged 6.3 million daily viewers, compared with 5.7 million for Oprah Winfrey's talk show. "Judge Judy" became the first show to knock "Oprah" out of the top spot in a decade — and it was "Judge Judy" that did it the last time too. Winfrey relied on more reruns than usual last season, which affected her ratings.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2010
Kerry Washington, 33, is probably best known for playing the wives of Ray Charles (in "Ray") and Idi Amin (in "The Last King of Scotland"). Other prominent appearances include the two "Fantastic Four" movies, "Mr. and Mrs. Smith," "Lakeview Terrace" with Samuel L. Jackson and Patrick Wilson, "The Human Stain" with Anthony Hopkins, "I Think I Love My Wife" with Chris Rock, "Bad Company" with Hopkins and Rock, and Spike Lee's "She Hate Me." Of 2006's "The Dead Girl," she says, "I watched it again just recently when Brittany [Murphy]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 2010
Bobby Charles Louisiana singer and songwriter Bobby Charles, 71, the singer-songwriter who penned such hits as Fats Domino's "Walking to New Orleans,""See You Later Alligator" by Bill Haley and His Comets and "But I Do" by Frogman Henry, died Thursday at his home in Abbeville, La. Charles had diabetes and was in remission from kidney cancer, said his publicist, Karen Johnson, but she did not know the cause of death. He had been living in his native Abbeville since his home in Holly Beach in south Louisiana was destroyed by Hurricane Rita in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 2009 | David Ritz, Ritz has collaborated on the autobiographies of, among others, Ray Charles, Marvin Gaye, Aretha Franklin and B.B. King.
In summer 1957, I was a teenager who had just moved to Texas from the East Coast. One Sunday afternoon, I happened to walk into a large social hall in South Dallas where a jam session was underway. On the bandstand were three saxophonists: Leroy "Hog" Cooper on baritone, David "Fathead" Newman on tenor and Hank Crawford on alto. Their playing shook me to my very core. Through their horns, they shouted out a blues with the ferocity of a Blind Lemon Jefferson or a Bessie Smith.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 2006 | Randy Lewis
The team that helped Ray Charles sell more albums and win more Grammys after his death in 2004 than he had in life is back with a new project posthumously pairing the late soul singer with the modern-day Count Basie Orchestra. "Ray Sings, Basie Swings" uses Charles' vocals from a live performance in the 1970s with instrumental backing from the Basie band newly tailored to the performance.
NEWS
February 11, 1987 | JEANNINE STEIN, Times Staff Writer
The invitation mandated black tie, but the mood at the San Fernando Valley Links' second annual Top Hat award dinner honoring Ray Charles was decidedly un-stuffy. While snippets of Charles' songs played during a slide presentation, the audience sang and clapped along to the singer's classic blues tunes. Despite pleas from the crowd of 700 to "Sing it, Ray!" Charles made a brief acceptance speech and listened while others lauded him for his musical and humanitarian accomplishments.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2009 | Jon Thurber
Hank Crawford, the bluesy alto saxophonist who was a mainstay of Ray Charles' band in the late 1950s and early '60s, has died. He was 74. Crawford, who also wrote arrangements for Charles and served as his musical director before forging his own career as a band leader, died Jan. 29 at his home in Memphis, Tenn. His sister, Delores, told the Commercial Appeal newspaper that Crawford had been in declining health for much of the past year with complications from a stroke in 2000.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2008 | Geoff Boucher
"You know the real reason you do a book like this? It's so you can actually remember all the things that have happened to you in 75 years of life." Quincy Jones let out a loud laugh at that one. The man who has 27 Grammys on his shelves has been playing a duet with music history for five decades, and most of the high notes are recounted in "The Complete Quincy Jones: My Journey & Passions." The lavish hardcover is a collection of interviews, letters, mementos and more than 400 photographs.
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