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Ray Chavira

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This has been a season of triumph for Ray Chavira, an ex-teacher and recovering alcoholic who has spent the past 17 years urging communities to say no to booze. Although he is an inveterate pessimist who uses apocalyptic terms to warn that alcohol is killing off the nation's youth, even Chavira has found reason to smile in recent months.
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BUSINESS
December 23, 2001
Shame on NBC and its parent company, General Electric ["NBC Falls Off the Wagon, Will Air Liquor Ads," Dec. 15]. At a time when alcohol-related traffic crashes nationally have increased for the first time since 1986, are up 38% from 1999 and account for 40% of nearly 17,000 traffic fatalities yearly, NBC and General Electric don't know when to say when. And when drunken-driving incidents constitute our nation's most common violent crime, it's high time the legalized pushers of our most common drug of violence--alcohol--feel the weight of American society's opprobrium.
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MAGAZINE
July 30, 1989
Regarding "Taking Back the Parks," by Nicole Yorkin (May 28): The park-using public has a right to expect safe harbors for its children. Fortunately, voters will have an opportunity next year to support an alcohol tax and community-protection statewide initiative that will bring cities and counties much-needed funds to protect and enhance their community environment. RAY CHAVIRA San Gabriel
OPINION
January 3, 1999
Kudos to the president for taking on the alcohol and restuarant industries, killers of the dream of a national 0.08% blood-alcohol concentration to determine drunken driving. "Clinton Calls for Stricter Law on Drunken Driving" (Dec. 27) correctly focused on "the most frequently committed violent crime in America," an observation long made by impaired-driving preventionists. But now that Dr. Ricardo Martinez, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is calling driving under the influence a "violent crime," perhaps the House of Representatives will stop taking the side of the booze merchants and pass the 0.08% limit, a moderate standard that is now law in 16 states and the District of Columbia, including California.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990
The March 3 article "Bush to Hollywood: Tell Truth About Drugs" revealed the President's pusillanimous approach to dealing with drugs and their television industry purveyors. Nancy-Reaganlike, he never once mentioned alcohol--the drug killing more young Americans in the 15-24 age category than any other. Why doesn't the commander-in-chief in the war against drugs wage war against booze? Probably because it often is the drug of choice of his Academy of Television Arts and Sciences audience and because the beer and wine industries are contributors not only to politicians but to broadcast advertising.
OPINION
January 3, 1999
Kudos to the president for taking on the alcohol and restuarant industries, killers of the dream of a national 0.08% blood-alcohol concentration to determine drunken driving. "Clinton Calls for Stricter Law on Drunken Driving" (Dec. 27) correctly focused on "the most frequently committed violent crime in America," an observation long made by impaired-driving preventionists. But now that Dr. Ricardo Martinez, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, is calling driving under the influence a "violent crime," perhaps the House of Representatives will stop taking the side of the booze merchants and pass the 0.08% limit, a moderate standard that is now law in 16 states and the District of Columbia, including California.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1989
Your article about non-alcoholic beer ("Miller Brewing Rolls Out a New Non-Alcoholic Beer," Oct. 31) erred in not informing your readers that "non-alcoholic" beer is not no-alcohol beer! So-called non-alcoholic beer still may contain up to 0.5% ethyl alcohol under federal law. It's high time for the fine print on near-beer labels to be enlarged so that the consumer can be better informed as to the true alcohol content by volume of each beer container. No license is required to sell these products, and no identification need be demanded of minors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991
Kudos to you for Richard Lee Colvin's recent articles on the laudatory efforts to de-alcoholize the community in the Pacoima-San Fernando area. Their self-help activities deserve the full support of the district's school-board member and city councilman, who have failed even to send a representative to respond to the alcohol-is-a-drug concerns of the residents and alcohol-abuse professionals attending an all-day conference on alcohol use and...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989
Paul Grein's July 30 article, "Suds 'n' Bucks 'n' Rock 'n' Roll," cogently illustrates the beer makers' voracious appetite for profit and the "futures" market as they target the young by sponsoring rock concerts. And kudos to retiring U.S. Surgeon Gen. C. Everett Koop, quoted in the article, for his efforts to: (1) eliminate alcohol sponsorship of concerts and athletic contests where much of the audience is likely to be under the drinking age; (2) eliminate the use in alcohol ads of celebrities who appeal to youths, and (3)
BUSINESS
October 6, 1985
"Alcohol Under Attack By 'New Temperance' " (Sept. 8) missed the mark by headlining alcohol as the target of the new temperance movement. The alcoholization of American life is the general focus of our public awareness efforts. An alcoholistic or systems approach to reducing and preventing escalating alcohol-related problems must focus on the various environmental relationships and policies conditioning the use of alcohol, a psycho-active drug with a high-risk potential.
BUSINESS
August 4, 1996
Since the Montreal-based Seagram Co. seems hellbent on advertising its Crown Royal Canadian whiskey on American television, despite pleas from President Clinton to desist ("Hard-Liquor Firms Urged to Stay on Wagon," June 15), it is unlikely that American liquor companies will hold back on their own profit considerations, regardless of public health and safety concerns. But such is the fragile nature of the 50-year voluntary ban observed by hard-liquor companies and advertisers. Profits over children.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995
Your excellent summary of the national movement to pressure the second-largest Spanish-language network into discontinuing its shameless, renewed practice of advertising hard liquor on the public airwaves in Morning Report (Calendar, June 14) missed two important points. First, Univision, the nation's largest Spanish-language TV network no longer debases itself and its viewers with distilled spirits advertising in violation of a 50-year voluntary ban by both distillers and broadcasters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This has been a season of triumph for Ray Chavira, an ex-teacher and recovering alcoholic who has spent the past 17 years urging communities to say no to booze. Although he is an inveterate pessimist who uses apocalyptic terms to warn that alcohol is killing off the nation's youth, even Chavira has found reason to smile in recent months.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1991
It is half true that cigarettes and alcohol are "legal products," as one billboard company executive stated in the article, "Cigarette Ads Disappearing in Some Areas" (Aug. 16). Many users of these drugs almost always start as juveniles, thus ensuring the legalized pushers of the most common killer-drugs of Americans new, paying customers to replace the dying. The article focused on tobacco and alcohol advertising targeting African-Americans, but it could just as well have applied to the burgeoning Latino community.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 1991
Kudos to you for Richard Lee Colvin's recent articles on the laudatory efforts to de-alcoholize the community in the Pacoima-San Fernando area. Their self-help activities deserve the full support of the district's school-board member and city councilman, who have failed even to send a representative to respond to the alcohol-is-a-drug concerns of the residents and alcohol-abuse professionals attending an all-day conference on alcohol use and...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 10, 1990
The March 3 article "Bush to Hollywood: Tell Truth About Drugs" revealed the President's pusillanimous approach to dealing with drugs and their television industry purveyors. Nancy-Reaganlike, he never once mentioned alcohol--the drug killing more young Americans in the 15-24 age category than any other. Why doesn't the commander-in-chief in the war against drugs wage war against booze? Probably because it often is the drug of choice of his Academy of Television Arts and Sciences audience and because the beer and wine industries are contributors not only to politicians but to broadcast advertising.
NEWS
December 25, 1988
It is unfortunate that staff writer Allan Parachini's otherwise excellent update, "Cracking Down on Drunk Drivers: Physicians Press for New Limits on Blood Alcohol Levels," neglected to report why "even three beers might be too much" for the road. Several studies have already been conducted in this country and in others that show clearly that even with one average drink the average person is already impaired for driving. That is why U.S. Sen. Frank Lautenberg and the U.S. Department of Transportation have understood well that a .04% of blood alcohol concentration is a reasonable and "legal definition of impairment for drivers of commercial vehicles."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1995
Your excellent summary of the national movement to pressure the second-largest Spanish-language network into discontinuing its shameless, renewed practice of advertising hard liquor on the public airwaves in Morning Report (Calendar, June 14) missed two important points. First, Univision, the nation's largest Spanish-language TV network no longer debases itself and its viewers with distilled spirits advertising in violation of a 50-year voluntary ban by both distillers and broadcasters.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1989
Your article about non-alcoholic beer ("Miller Brewing Rolls Out a New Non-Alcoholic Beer," Oct. 31) erred in not informing your readers that "non-alcoholic" beer is not no-alcohol beer! So-called non-alcoholic beer still may contain up to 0.5% ethyl alcohol under federal law. It's high time for the fine print on near-beer labels to be enlarged so that the consumer can be better informed as to the true alcohol content by volume of each beer container. No license is required to sell these products, and no identification need be demanded of minors.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1989
Paul Grein's July 30 article, "Suds 'n' Bucks 'n' Rock 'n' Roll," cogently illustrates the beer makers' voracious appetite for profit and the "futures" market as they target the young by sponsoring rock concerts. And kudos to retiring U.S. Surgeon Gen. C. Everett Koop, quoted in the article, for his efforts to: (1) eliminate alcohol sponsorship of concerts and athletic contests where much of the audience is likely to be under the drinking age; (2) eliminate the use in alcohol ads of celebrities who appeal to youths, and (3)
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