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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1996
The comedy community is still reeling from shock and sadness at the recent death of Ray Combs. It is such a shame that he sought such a permanent solution to his temporary problems. Hollywood is a tough town that kicks you when you are down but no one thought it would take down a guy like Ray. He survived his paralyzing injuries from the car accident and continued to pursue his dream of hosting his own television show. No one will know the tragic circumstances that led him to take his own life but he will be dearly missed by his fans, especially those that he won over doing his stand-up at the clubs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996
The death of TV game show host Ray Combs, who hanged himself with a bedsheet last month in the psychiatric ward of Glendale Adventist Hospital, has been ruled a suicide. A coroner's official said Monday that toxicology reports showed only therapeutic drugs in Combs' system. Neuropathology reports showed that hanging, not injuries to the head he had received before his admittance to the hospital, had killed him.
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NEWS
June 3, 1996 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Combs, the 40-year-old former host of TV's "The New Family Feud" game show, committed suicide, dying Sunday at Glendale Adventist Hospital a day after he had been admitted for an unrelated head injury, authorities said. Neither hospital officials nor Glendale police, who are investigating along with the county coroner's office, would say how the TV game show host killed himself. Glendale Police Lt.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1996
The comedy community is still reeling from shock and sadness at the recent death of Ray Combs. It is such a shame that he sought such a permanent solution to his temporary problems. Hollywood is a tough town that kicks you when you are down but no one thought it would take down a guy like Ray. He survived his paralyzing injuries from the car accident and continued to pursue his dream of hosting his own television show. No one will know the tragic circumstances that led him to take his own life but he will be dearly missed by his fans, especially those that he won over doing his stand-up at the clubs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1996
The death of TV game show host Ray Combs, who hanged himself with a bedsheet last month in the psychiatric ward of Glendale Adventist Hospital, has been ruled a suicide. A coroner's official said Monday that toxicology reports showed only therapeutic drugs in Combs' system. Neuropathology reports showed that hanging, not injuries to the head he had received before his admittance to the hospital, had killed him.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1996 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Distraught over marital problems and recent career setbacks, former game show host Ray Combs tried to commit suicide at least twice last week before he succeeded in hanging himself in a hospital room, authorities said Monday. Police said Combs, 40, who hosted "The New Family Feud" from 1988 to 1994, was found dead in a closet, hanging from a bedsheet, at about 4 a.m. Sunday at Glendale Adventist Medical Center. Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994 | CHIP JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Combs, who hosts the popular syndicated TV game show "The New Family Feud," was hospitalized in serious to critical condition Tuesday, partially paralyzed by injuries suffered in a freeway crash, according to his agent. Combs, 38, who has hosted the show for six years, was injured Monday, said his agent, Irv Schwartz. Combs, who is under treatment at St.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police investigators said Wednesday that a hospital closet bar designed to give way under pressure did not work properly, allowing a former TV game show host to hang himself in the psychiatric ward of a Glendale hospital. Meanwhile, county health officials have opened their own investigation into the death of entertainer Ray Combs, who hanged himself with a bedsheet Sunday morning at Glendale Adventist Hospital.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1990 | GREG BRAXTON, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
"Family Feud" Host Arrested: Ray Combs, host of the television game show "Family Feud," was arrested in Cincinnati on a trespassing complaint after he appeared on stage at the comedy club he co-owns. Combs' arrest was the latest legal action in a dispute about ownership and operation of the downtown club he and others opened in September. Combs, released later, called the incident "the grossest injustice of human rights I have ever seen."
NEWS
January 22, 1989
I have been an avid viewer of "Family Feud" for many years. At first I was disappointed that Richard Dawson was no longer hosting it. But after watching Ray Combs the past couple of months, I don't miss Dawson or his kissing antics one bit. Other game-show hosts can be so boring and phony, but Combs comes across to me as someone who really cares about the contestants and who tries to make them feel warm and relaxed. Reesa Davidson, Tarzana
NEWS
June 8, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Combs lived to make people laugh. But in the end, the effervescent comedian, game show host and father of six couldn't staunch the agonies that coursed through him in his last few days. Family and friends said goodbye to Combs on Friday at a funeral attended by hundreds of mourners. The 40-year-old son of an Ohio steelworker had parlayed a talent for making people feel good into appearances on "The Tonight Show" and, finally, a six-year stint hosting the syndicated game show "Family Feud."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1996 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Police investigators said Wednesday that a hospital closet bar designed to give way under pressure did not work properly, allowing a former TV game show host to hang himself in the psychiatric ward of a Glendale hospital. Meanwhile, county health officials have opened their own investigation into the death of entertainer Ray Combs, who hanged himself with a bedsheet Sunday morning at Glendale Adventist Hospital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1996 | STEVE RYFLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Distraught over marital problems and recent career setbacks, former game show host Ray Combs tried to commit suicide at least twice last week before he succeeded in hanging himself in a hospital room, authorities said Monday. Police said Combs, 40, who hosted "The New Family Feud" from 1988 to 1994, was found dead in a closet, hanging from a bedsheet, at about 4 a.m. Sunday at Glendale Adventist Medical Center. Sgt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1996
Distraught over marital problems and recent career setbacks, former game show host Ray Combs tried to commit suicide at least twice last week before he succeeded in hanging himself in a Glendale hospital room, authorities said Monday. Police said Combs, 40, who hosted "The New Family Feud" from 1986 to 1994, was found dead in a closet, hanging from a bedsheet, about 4 a.m. Sunday at Glendale Adventist Medical Center. Sgt.
NEWS
June 3, 1996 | ABIGAIL GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ray Combs, the 40-year-old former host of TV's "The New Family Feud" game show, committed suicide, dying Sunday at Glendale Adventist Hospital a day after he had been admitted for an unrelated head injury, authorities said. Neither hospital officials nor Glendale police, who are investigating along with the county coroner's office, would say how the TV game show host killed himself. Glendale Police Lt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994
Television game show host Ray Combs was able to move his toes and flex his hands Wednesday, two days after he was temporarily paralyzed in a traffic collision on the Ventura Freeway, his agent reported. Combs, 38, host of "The New Family Feud" for six years, suffered a swollen spinal disk in the accident, which doctors believed caused the paralysis, said Irv Schwartz, Comb's agent. His condition was upgraded from serious to fair at St. Joseph's Medical Center in Burbank, Schwartz said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987 | Christine Ziaya
Meanwhile, Mark Goodson Prods. is reviving "Family Feud"--with comedian Ray Combs as emcee. According to Howard Felsher, producer of the old show (which went off the air in '85 when its ratings finally dropped) and the new, it'll be ready for airing by next July, with CBS set to carry the daytime version. The evening version will be syndicated beginning in September. (Felsher said the comeback had to do with the success of other revived game shows like "Password."
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