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Ray Cooney

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Ray Cooney stands at the apron of a stage in Long Beach, probing his round, ruddy, predominantly bald and slightly bumpy skull to make a point about his long life in the British theater. His fingers have marched well north of the furrowed trenches of his forehead, searching for a spot near the crown. Somewhere up there, he says, is a little white scar, proof that farce is not always a laughing matter. When it comes to inducing laughter among theatergoers, few pates have been more productive.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2004 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
The giddy guilty pleasures of old-school boulevard fare propel the West Coast premiere of "Caught in the Net," produced by International City Theater in Long Beach. Writer-director Ray Cooney's schizoid farce about a bigamist's colliding households is an uproarious example of high-grade lowbrow lunacy. West End icon Cooney has been generating post-Feydeau folly since 1961.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Attention, fans of that silly genre, the British sex farce: "Out of Order," at El Portal Center, is straight from the source. Ray Cooney, one of the form's acknowledged masters, is the director and co-star as well as the playwright. The genre is seldom represented on L.A.'s major stages, and almost never with someone of Cooney's experience at the helm. His writing credits include the likes of "Run for Your Wife," "Not Now Darling," "Move Over, Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2004 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
Ray Cooney stands at the apron of a stage in Long Beach, probing his round, ruddy, predominantly bald and slightly bumpy skull to make a point about his long life in the British theater. His fingers have marched well north of the furrowed trenches of his forehead, searching for a spot near the crown. Somewhere up there, he says, is a little white scar, proof that farce is not always a laughing matter. When it comes to inducing laughter among theatergoers, few pates have been more productive.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ray Cooney's farces are simplicity itself, and that's probably why they're continually popular. His "Out of Order," for instance, was a smash hit in London's West End and won the coveted Olivier Award for best comedy. They're very funny confections, requiring their audiences only to sit back and laugh. Which is why it's always curious when directors feel the need to add their own funny on top of Cooney's.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2004 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
The giddy guilty pleasures of old-school boulevard fare propel the West Coast premiere of "Caught in the Net," produced by International City Theater in Long Beach. Writer-director Ray Cooney's schizoid farce about a bigamist's colliding households is an uproarious example of high-grade lowbrow lunacy. West End icon Cooney has been generating post-Feydeau folly since 1961.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 1996 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British playwright Ray Cooney writes some of the funniest farces going today. His "Out of Order," currently at the Newport Theatre Arts Center, is so comical and clever that it won the coveted British Olivier Award in 1991. But farce is not easy. As director Ken Rugg acknowledges in his program notes, "Farce can present the director with a minefield of potential bombs." And Rugg steps on a number of them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 1995 | SCOTT COLLINS
One has to wonder what Newt Gingrich, newly tapped duke of the right wing, would make of "Out of Order" and its penchant for tweaking hypocritically conservative politicians. No "Boys Town" this, Ray Cooney's farce concerns a stuffy British cabinet minister (Steve Brady) who tries to tryst with a pretty young secretary (Risa Benson) in a swank London hotel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2003 | Don Shirley
Why are such relatively well-known actors as Linda Blair, Charlene Tilton, Robert Walden, Johnny Whitaker and Eddie Mekka appearing in Ray Cooney's farce "Run for Your Wife" for a brief run, only Wednesday through Saturday at the 96-seat Theatre East, above a Studio City bowling alley? Because it's a warmup for a larger, presumably better-paying run at the Trump 29 Casino, near Indio, on the following weekend, in a theater that could seat as many as 2,100.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
British playwright Ray Cooney writes some of the snazziest little farces making the rounds today. It's a shame they contain so many stumbling blocks for unwary directors. Like all good farces, they are like music and must be timed almost to the split second. Their laughs are not so much in the dialogue as in the action. That's what defeats the current revival of Cooney's "Run for Your Wife" at Cypress Civic Theatre, directed by Michael Ross, who is usually more careful.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 2001 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Attention, fans of that silly genre, the British sex farce: "Out of Order," at El Portal Center, is straight from the source. Ray Cooney, one of the form's acknowledged masters, is the director and co-star as well as the playwright. The genre is seldom represented on L.A.'s major stages, and almost never with someone of Cooney's experience at the helm. His writing credits include the likes of "Run for Your Wife," "Not Now Darling," "Move Over, Mrs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1998 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ray Cooney's farces are simplicity itself, and that's probably why they're continually popular. His "Out of Order," for instance, was a smash hit in London's West End and won the coveted Olivier Award for best comedy. They're very funny confections, requiring their audiences only to sit back and laugh. Which is why it's always curious when directors feel the need to add their own funny on top of Cooney's.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1992 | T. H. McCULLOH
British playwright Ray Cooney specializes in sex farces, a genre popular in the United Kingdom. Here they might look like outrageous sitcoms, but they're often far better and, like all good farces, they're frantic and funny. And the British love them. Manhattan Pier Players' production of Cooney's "Run for Your Wife," in its first Southern California production, is certainly funny, but it's not quite as frantic as it could be under Jean Van De Griek's direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1993 | M.E. WARREN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
John Smith is a bigamist. He's got one wife, Mary, in Wimbledon and another wife, Barbara, in Streatham. It's precisely a 4 1/2-minute ride between John's two lovers, and he and his taxi cab keep a tight schedule. One day, John is hospitalized after rescuing an old lady from a couple of young thugs. Not only is his schedule thrown off by several critical hours, but, somehow or other, the hospital forms are filled out with both addresses.
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