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Ray Davies

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2004 | Randy Lewis
Kinks singer Ray Davies was shot but not seriously injured Sunday in New Orleans by a man who allegedly stole his female companion's purse, BBC News has reported. Davies, 59, was visiting the city's French Quarter when two men walked up to him and his companion and grabbed her purse. When Davies ran after them, one turned and shot him in the leg, police said. One man was arrested and police were searching for the other as of Monday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 1, 2014 | By Kari Howard
I'm lucky -- good storytelling isn't only my passion, it's my career. My other passion is music, and it probably won't surprise you that some of my favorite songwriters are wonderful storytellers. One of this week's story soundtracks was written by one of the best narrative songwriters in pop-rock history, Ray Davies of the Kinks. Sometimes he gives us a mini-screenplay, like in “Come Dancing” (see Thursday's Great Read, below). In that song, the arc of the narrator's childhood is viewed through his older sister's dates, and dreams, at the Palais dance hall.
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OPINION
January 13, 2005 | By Steve Appleford
Ray Davies has learned to embrace his long season of reinvention. In recent years, the Kinks frontman has lamented the indefinite hiatus of the band he led for decades, but as of late he's responded with renewed energy and ambition unknown to many of his surviving contemporaries from rock's original British Invasion. In 2008, he released a moving and at times autobiographical solo album, "Working Man's Cafe"; this year, he began reinterpreting his life's work with a large choir on the just-released "The Kinks Choral Collection."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2013 | By Chris Willman
The conflict between mods and rockers, two warring factions of youth culture in Britain circa 1965, previously served as the backdrop for a terrifically gritty film, "Quadrophenia," based on the Who's concept album. Now the same conflict is the milieu for a stage musical, "ModRock," that exudes more sunshine than a decade's worth of London summers combined. If Pete Townshend ever deigned to see this show, you wouldn't blame him for succumbing to a fatal case of hives. The "ModRock" now on view at El Portal in North Hollywood almost plays like "Quadrophenia" reimagined by Walt Disney - and not even the modern iteration of the studio, but the Disney that was making frothy musicals such as "The Happiest Millionaire" in the mid-'60s.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1995 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It figures that when Ray Davies sat down to write his memoirs, he wouldn't approach it like everybody else. As front man and primary songwriter of the Kinks, Davies has led the uncertain but so far unending march of one of rock's most conflicted and contradictory bands, one whose career trajectory resembles the jarring lines of a seismograph rocking to a major quake.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 1988 | ELAINE POFELDT, Times Staff Writer
In 1964, Ray Davies quit studying art and theater at Hornsey Art College in London to join his brother Dave's new band. "OK, go do your music," Davies recalled being told by the school principal, "but I have a feeling you'll come back to the theater." This week, after more than two decades as the lead singer and principal songwriter for the legendary British rock group the Kinks, Davies is proving the Hornsey administrator correct.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2011 | Matt Diehl
"The wonderful thing about making records is something comes out you never expected," explains Ray Davies, who knows of what he speaks. In nearly five decades as leader of one of rock's great bands, the Kinks, and as a solo artist, Davies has been involved with more than 30 LPs, helped innovate the concept album and created classic-rock staples such as "You Really Got Me" and "Lola. " "Ray's one of the greatest pop rock songwriters of all time," says Britt Daniel of acclaimed indie-rockers Spoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"I'm a 20th century man, but I don't wanna be here." --a 25-year-old refrain that is Ray Davies' pithiest statement of his attitude toward modernity * While many of his rock 'n' roll peers during the 1960s were trying self-consciously to break with the past and declare the dawning of a brave new age (that somehow never came), Ray Davies was writing songs for his band, the Kinks, that often cast him as the last of the Victorians.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1997 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When his singing voice has vanished, when his songwriting muse has bid him a final adieu, Ray Davies will probably be able to carry an evening on charm alone. But the evening when he has nothing to fall back on but his classic Kinks catalog and the skills and instincts of a superlative ham seemed far away Tuesday night at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. Davies was back with "20th Century Man," the one-man (plus guitar accompanist) show he has been trouping about since mid-1995.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
RAY DAVIES' music is grounded in the streets of London in the way that Woody Allen films live on the Manhattan grid. Davies writes songs that are more than travelogue or local booster tunes -- his wry and sophisticated observations on his native land's culture go well beyond the usual pop in classic Kinks songs such as "Waterloo Sunset" and "A Well Respected Man."
SPORTS
August 12, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
A musical mishmash of eras and styles closed the London Olympics in a long and raucous fashion on Sunday night to complete what its director called the "after-party" of this 17-day global event. There were the familiar music icons, including the Pet Shop Boys, the reunited-for-a-night Spice Girls, Annie Lennox, Ray Davies, Fatboy Slim and singer George Michael, who was making his first live appearance since recovering from pneumonia last year. The Who closed the show with a four-song set that concluded with "My Generation.
WORLD
November 30, 2011 | By Fabiola Gutierrez and Chris Kraul, Los Angeles Times
A Chilean judge is seeking the extradition of a former U.S. military officer to face murder charges in the 1973 slaying of freelance journalist and filmmaker Charles Horman, a case dramatized in the Oscar-winning film "Missing," court sources confirmed Tuesday. Judge Jorge Zepeda wants former U.S. Navy Capt. Ray E. Davis, whose whereabouts were not immediately clear Tuesday, to face trial in Chile for his alleged involvement in the deaths of Horman and U.S. student Frank Teruggi.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2011 | Matt Diehl
"The wonderful thing about making records is something comes out you never expected," explains Ray Davies, who knows of what he speaks. In nearly five decades as leader of one of rock's great bands, the Kinks, and as a solo artist, Davies has been involved with more than 30 LPs, helped innovate the concept album and created classic-rock staples such as "You Really Got Me" and "Lola. " "Ray's one of the greatest pop rock songwriters of all time," says Britt Daniel of acclaimed indie-rockers Spoon.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2009 | Steve Appleford
Ray Davies has learned to embrace his long season of reinvention. In recent years, the Kinks frontman has lamented the indefinite hiatus of the band he led for decades, but as of late he's responded with renewed energy and ambition unknown to many of his surviving contemporaries from rock's original British Invasion. In 2008, he released a moving and at times autobiographical solo album, "Working Man's Cafe"; this year, he began reinterpreting his life's work with a large choir on the just-released "The Kinks Choral Collection."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2008 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
It's an overcast Saturday in Los Angeles, and Ray Davies is on the road again. The longtime leader of the Kinks is in the back seat of a car sent by his label, riding from LAX to his hotel in tinted glasses and a Panama hat, a small suitcase between his knees. He looks pleased.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2006 | Richard Cromelin, Times Staff Writer
Ray Davies' contemporaries from the original British Invasion aren't exactly in their creative primes. Of the few with reasonably active careers 40 years on, only the Rolling Stones have shown a flash of artistic ambition lately, and that flurry on their last album came as a surprise after decades of coasting.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2008 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
It's an overcast Saturday in Los Angeles, and Ray Davies is on the road again. The longtime leader of the Kinks is in the back seat of a car sent by his label, riding from LAX to his hotel in tinted glasses and a Panama hat, a small suitcase between his knees. He looks pleased.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
RAY DAVIES' music is grounded in the streets of London in the way that Woody Allen films live on the Manhattan grid. Davies writes songs that are more than travelogue or local booster tunes -- his wry and sophisticated observations on his native land's culture go well beyond the usual pop in classic Kinks songs such as "Waterloo Sunset" and "A Well Respected Man."
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