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Ray Dolby

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April 30, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
When Ray Dolby (yes, that Dolby) first began installing his buttonless, switchless and knobless noise-reduction boxes in recording studios in New York and London, engineers and producers were convinced the man was dabbling in the occult: You put hissy tape recordings into it and got quiet programming out of it. "People kept talking about magic; they were all convinced I had elves working for me at the time," Dolby recalled with a chuckle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2014 | By Susan King
"Gravity" and "Frozen" were the feature film winners at the 50th Cinema Audio Society Awards on Saturday evening in Los Angeles. The team from "Gravity" won for sound mixing in a live action motion picture, and "Frozen" took the top prize for sound mixing in an animated motion picture. "Behind the Candelabra" won for sound mixing in a television movie or miniseries, and the "Game of Thrones" episode titled "The Rains of Castamere" took home the prize for sound mixing in a one-hour TV series.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2013 | By David Colker
Before an audio revolution in the mid-1960s, just about all music, dialogue and other sounds played on tape recordings had one thing in common: hiss. The bothersome, underlying noise seemed especially unavoidable during quiet passages on the once-ubiquitous cassette tapes. But then came an engineering breakthrough that nearly wiped out the hiss, and made the inventor's name - Dolby - world-famous. Ray Dolby, 80, died Thursday at his home in San Francisco. The company he founded, Dolby Laboratories, released a statement saying he had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease in recent years and in July was found to have acute leukemia.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Outgoing "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno and "Veep" star Julia Louis-Dreyfus are among the six new inductees to the Television Academy Hall of Fame who were announced Monday. The other inductees are super-prolific TV writer David E. Kelley, Dolby Laboratories founder Ray Dolby, 21st Century Fox and News Corp. chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch and veteran TV executive Brandon Stoddard. All of the honorees have proved themselves to be resilient in the face of an ever-changing entertainment landscape.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
The January day is improbably balmy. From the fourth floor of a house on Presidio Heights, the view of the Golden Gate Bridge is unsurpassed. There is a grand piano in the oak-paneled fourth-floor room, one that will play by itself if you push the right button. There is an oil painting of the sea and a model sailboat, a binnacle compass and a telescope you can focus on the ships passing in and out of the bay. The man in the room is sitting at his desk, his back to the splendors below.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Ray Dolby, who developed music and motion-picture sound systems that won him Academy Awards, is planning an initial public stock offering that may value his company at as much as $1.5 billion, people familiar with the matter said. Dolby Laboratories Inc., based in San Francisco, has hired brokerage firm Morgan Stanley and plans to raise about $400 million selling new shares and part of Ray Dolby's stake, said a person who declined to be identified. The transaction is planned for next year.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 23, 2014 | By Susan King
"Gravity" and "Frozen" were the feature film winners at the 50th Cinema Audio Society Awards on Saturday evening in Los Angeles. The team from "Gravity" won for sound mixing in a live action motion picture, and "Frozen" took the top prize for sound mixing in an animated motion picture. "Behind the Candelabra" won for sound mixing in a television movie or miniseries, and the "Game of Thrones" episode titled "The Rains of Castamere" took home the prize for sound mixing in a one-hour TV series.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2005 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
Dolby Laboratories Inc. added the sound of money to its repertoire Thursday. Shares of the San Francisco company, known for its pioneering audio technology, jumped 35% in their public debut, the best first-day showing for an initial public offering so far this year. The offering, which raised $495 million, was priced at $18 a share, above the expected range of $13.50 to $15.50 a share. Trading under the ticker symbol DLB, Dolby's stock rose as high as $25.45 before closing at $24.30, up $6.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Patrick Kevin Day
Outgoing "Tonight Show" host Jay Leno and "Veep" star Julia Louis-Dreyfus are among the six new inductees to the Television Academy Hall of Fame who were announced Monday. The other inductees are super-prolific TV writer David E. Kelley, Dolby Laboratories founder Ray Dolby, 21st Century Fox and News Corp. chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch and veteran TV executive Brandon Stoddard. All of the honorees have proved themselves to be resilient in the face of an ever-changing entertainment landscape.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Ray Dolby, the inventor and engineer who founded Dolby Laboratories and pioneered noise-reducing and surround-sound technology widely used in the film and recording industries, has died in San Francisco at 80, the company announced Thursday. Dolby had been living with Alzheimer's disease in recent years and was diagnosed in July with acute leukemia, the company said. “Today we lost a friend, mentor and true visionary,” Dolby Laboratories President and Chief Executive Kevin Yeaman said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Rebecca Keegan
Ray Dolby, the inventor and engineer who founded Dolby Laboratories and pioneered noise-reducing and surround-sound technology widely used in the film and recording industries, has died in San Francisco at 80, the company announced Thursday. Dolby had been living with Alzheimer's disease in recent years and was diagnosed in July with acute leukemia, the company said. “Today we lost a friend, mentor and true visionary,” Dolby Laboratories President and Chief Executive Kevin Yeaman said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 2013 | By David Colker
Before an audio revolution in the mid-1960s, just about all music, dialogue and other sounds played on tape recordings had one thing in common: hiss. The bothersome, underlying noise seemed especially unavoidable during quiet passages on the once-ubiquitous cassette tapes. But then came an engineering breakthrough that nearly wiped out the hiss, and made the inventor's name - Dolby - world-famous. Ray Dolby, 80, died Thursday at his home in San Francisco. The company he founded, Dolby Laboratories, released a statement saying he had been suffering from Alzheimer's disease in recent years and in July was found to have acute leukemia.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2005 | Debora Vrana, Times Staff Writer
Dolby Laboratories Inc. added the sound of money to its repertoire Thursday. Shares of the San Francisco company, known for its pioneering audio technology, jumped 35% in their public debut, the best first-day showing for an initial public offering so far this year. The offering, which raised $495 million, was priced at $18 a share, above the expected range of $13.50 to $15.50 a share. Trading under the ticker symbol DLB, Dolby's stock rose as high as $25.45 before closing at $24.30, up $6.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
Ray Dolby, who developed music and motion-picture sound systems that won him Academy Awards, is planning an initial public stock offering that may value his company at as much as $1.5 billion, people familiar with the matter said. Dolby Laboratories Inc., based in San Francisco, has hired brokerage firm Morgan Stanley and plans to raise about $400 million selling new shares and part of Ray Dolby's stake, said a person who declined to be identified. The transaction is planned for next year.
NEWS
January 29, 1988 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
The January day is improbably balmy. From the fourth floor of a house on Presidio Heights, the view of the Golden Gate Bridge is unsurpassed. There is a grand piano in the oak-paneled fourth-floor room, one that will play by itself if you push the right button. There is an oil painting of the sea and a model sailboat, a binnacle compass and a telescope you can focus on the ships passing in and out of the bay. The man in the room is sitting at his desk, his back to the splendors below.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 30, 1986 | JOHN VOLAND
When Ray Dolby (yes, that Dolby) first began installing his buttonless, switchless and knobless noise-reduction boxes in recording studios in New York and London, engineers and producers were convinced the man was dabbling in the occult: You put hissy tape recordings into it and got quiet programming out of it. "People kept talking about magic; they were all convinced I had elves working for me at the time," Dolby recalled with a chuckle.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN and CLAUDIA PUIG, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Eastman Kodak and Ray Dolby and Ioan Allen of Dolby Laboratories were among the honorees at Sunday night's bestowing of Oscars for scientific and technical achievement at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Eastman's honorary Oscar, noting the company's "fundamental place" in movie making for more than 100 years, is the company's sixth. (The first came in 1931, and all have been for developing and improving motion-picture film.) The Dolby Oscar is for continuous contributions to motion-picture sound.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
Choreographer and dance instructor Patsy Swayze, who trained her late actor son Patrick Swayze on his way to "Dirty Dancing" fame, has died. She was 86.  Swayze died Monday evening at her home in Simi Valley, said publicist Annett Wolf. A cause of death was not given, though the Houston Chronicle reported Swayze suffered a stroke on Sept. 8.   The Houston native choreographed the 1980 film “Urban Cowboy,” for which she coached John Travolta on the movements of the two-step.
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