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April 5, 1994 | SARA FRITZ and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, Hayden McIlroy made spectacular profits in the commodities markets by doing business with Robert L. (Red) Bone, a broker in the Springdale, Ark., office of a Chicago-based trading firm. It was not until McIlroy visited the trading floor in Chicago in early 1979 that he met a young trader named Ira Brill and discovered what may have been one factor in making such success possible.
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NEWS
April 5, 1994 | SARA FRITZ and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Like First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, Hayden McIlroy made spectacular profits in the commodities markets by doing business with Robert L. (Red) Bone, a broker in the Springdale, Ark., office of a Chicago-based trading firm. It was not until McIlroy visited the trading floor in Chicago in early 1979 that he met a young trader named Ira Brill and discovered what may have been one factor in making such success possible.
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NEWS
March 30, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hillary Rodham Clinton, acting on the advice of a commodities broker later barred from trading for ethical reasons and the lawyer for one of Arkansas' largest state-regulated businesses, turned a $1,000 stake into a $99,000 profit in less than a year in the late 1970s, the White House disclosed Tuesday. Officials said that there was nothing improper in Mrs.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton on Monday paid $14,615 in back taxes and interest on newly discovered profits from Mrs. Clinton's commodity trading in 1979-80. "The Clintons do not know how the error occurred but accept responsibility for it," said the Clintons' personal attorney, David E. Kendall. "They view it as their duty to come forward, disclose the mistake and pay what is owed." A senior White House aide said that previous statements about Mrs.
NEWS
March 31, 1994 | JOHN M. BRODER and SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The White House has portrayed the commodities market trading that netted First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton almost $100,000 in a two-year period as a case of an ordinary small investor who took her chances and came up a winner with shrewd judgment and a little guidance from an experienced friend. But experts and officials in the volatile futures trading industry said Wednesday that what she did would be highly unusual for the average small investor to pull off successfully.
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